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    1. Why some people change their wallpaper/profile picture more than others ?

      Is there any psychological thing behind it. if you are a changer why do you change your picture so often ? and what do you think about people who don't change it at all ?, and if you are constant...

      Is there any psychological thing behind it. if you are a changer why do you change your picture so often ? and what do you think about people who don't change it at all ?, and if you are constant why ? and what do you think about people who change it ?

      it's not that important I know, but it has been in my head for long time not. why people change their prof pic, computer/phone background so often than others ?

      1 vote
    2. Is there a known image norm suitable for textured images?

      Suppose I am trying to iteratively produce a completed image from some subset using a combination of convolutional/DNN methods. What Image norm is best? The natural (for me) norm to ascribe to an...

      Suppose I am trying to iteratively produce a completed image from some subset using a combination of convolutional/DNN methods. What Image norm is best?

      The natural (for me) norm to ascribe to an image is to take the bitmap as a vector with L2. If the input image is anime or something else, the uniform coloring makes this very likely to be a good fit in a low dimension - that is: no overfitting.

      However: pictures of fur. Given a small square, the AI, set to extrapolate more fur from that single image, should be expected to get that stuff right next to the given subimage right, but further away, i want it to get the texture right, not the exact representation. So, if the AI shifts the fur far away from the image left by just the right amount, it could get an incredibly poor score.

      If I were to use the naive L2 norm directly, I would be guaranteed to overfit, and you can see this with some of the demo algorithms for image generation around the web. Now, the answer to this is probably to use a fourier or a wavelet transform and then take the LN norm over the transformed space instead (correct me if I'm wrong.)

      However, we get to the most complex class: images with different textures in them. In this case, I have a problem. Wavelet-type transforms don't behave well with discrete boundaries, while pixel-by-pixel methods don't do well with the textured parts of images. Is there a good method of determining image similarity for these cases?

      More philosophically, what is the mathematical notion of similarity that our eye picks out? Any pointers or suggestions are appreciated. This is the last of two issues I have with a design I built for a Sparse NN.

      Edit: For those interested, here is an example, notice how the predictions tend to blur details

      7 votes
    3. If you could completely refresh something and rebuild it from the ground up, what would it be and why?

      A lot of things we live with have significant technical debt because they were designed and implemented without modern knowledge and understanding. Knowing what we know now, in the present moment,...

      A lot of things we live with have significant technical debt because they were designed and implemented without modern knowledge and understanding.

      Knowing what we know now, in the present moment, what would you be interested in fundamentally redesigning if you could?

      This does NOT have to be technology related, by the way, though it certainly can (anyone want to talk about redesigning usernames and passwords -- please?). It can pretty much be anything: NASCAR races, art criticism, specific social norms, sunglasses, etc.

      In your explanation, don't just share what you're interested in tearing down, but how you would rebuild it for the better. What improvements would your methods bring to the table?

      14 votes
    4. How do you pick what sources of news you listen to?

      I've recently been getting into RSS reading and well, I usually just went with whatever was given in a forum (like Tildes for example). Although, I've recently been looking into news organizations...

      I've recently been getting into RSS reading and well, I usually just went with whatever was given in a forum (like Tildes for example). Although, I've recently been looking into news organizations I follow to see if I should actually trust them.

      Factors that came to mind to be important was looking at past controversies regarding them to see where they might fail in the future and who owns them. It made me realize that most sources I had actually might not be who I want to follow for news but then well, not many are left and while I do want to cut down on the amount of news I get because it's overwhelming, I also don't want to miss important news.

      So how do you pick what sources of news you listen and what are some news you trust and why?

      17 votes
    5. Diaries and Journalling, Oh My!

      Hi Tilderinos! Do any of you regularly journal, keep a diary, or otherwise record your thoughts and history, on a computer or on paper? I've been using the "bullet journal" algorithm (and yes,...

      Hi Tilderinos! Do any of you regularly journal, keep a diary, or otherwise record your thoughts and history, on a computer or on paper?

      I've been using the "bullet journal" algorithm (and yes, Ryder, it's a set of algorithms and data structures, no matter how much you say otherwise) for a while, slowly refining my personal practice over time - and sometimes making huge changes! Just this month, for my October journal prep, I switched from a list-style monthly log to a 7x5 grid of 3.5x3.5cm squares. It's very easy to make with my dotted notebook and a ruler, and it's easier to get an idea of my month at a glance!

      I've also decided to switch from a monthly braindump and check-in to doing smaller, mini-check-ins weekly, which I hope will help me keep better tabs on my fitness and mental health!

      So, what do you do? How do you feel about it? Share pictures if you're comfortable!

      8 votes
    6. What 'still/currently/actively in development' games are you following?

      Admittedly the game probably has to have a devlog of some form, otherwise this question is synonymous with "what games are you waiting for?", which is far too generic a question. The game I'm most...

      Admittedly the game probably has to have a devlog of some form, otherwise this question is synonymous with "what games are you waiting for?", which is far too generic a question.

      The game I'm most interested in is Songs of the Eons (itch.io, most active), which wants to be like Dwarf Fortress but a grand strategy game (main post, for context). Obviously they've noted that such a project will have Dwarf Fortress esque development, so waiting is very much in order.

      There's also Hyperbolica (trailer) which I've posted about here somewhat.

      There's also KSP 2, Hytale and Creeper World 4 which I like but don't follow that regularly, for not much reason TBH.

      I'd probably also follow Deltarune but Toby doesn't seem to really do dev updates too often.

      So are there any games that you're following as they're developed?

      4 votes
    7. Deciding between Godot and Unity

      Hey, all. I'm back four weeks to the day after you guys gave me a lot of great advice about potentially making a 2D RPG out of my tabletop RPG. I decided to try both Godot and Unity given what...

      Hey, all. I'm back four weeks to the day after you guys gave me a lot of great advice about potentially making a 2D RPG out of my tabletop RPG. I decided to try both Godot and Unity given what people told me and I completed two tutorials for each over the last few weeks. After completing these two tutorials, I have some questions that I hope maybe some of you can answer to help me choose between the two.

      TL;DR at the bottom. This is a long post.

      For context, here's the tutorials I did:

      Godot - https://www.davidepesce.com/godot-tutorials/
      Unity - https://learn.unity.com/project/ruby-s-2d-rpg

      To be frank, the Unity tutorial wasn't really an RPG. There were no stats, no quests, XP. It was much more of an adventure game. That's fine, it still gave me a lot of time inside the engine to learn a lot of basics.

      So, working with each one had it's own up and downs.

      Unity's use of an external scripting program seemed to hurt me quite a bit, from simple things such as forgetting to save before going back to Unity (I did this way too much) to having to declare public variables in the script and then filling them in the Unity GUI rather than just doing it all by script. The editor itself also seems to be kind of heavy, I was get the spiral beach ball for a second or two every time I went between the script editor and Unity and I have a machine that can edit 8K video without proxies. These general load times and stuff like that seemed to come up regularly. Tilemapping in the tutorial didn't include autotiling, I assume Unity has this somewhere built in? Or do you need to purchase an asset to get this functionality?

      On the plus side, Unity overall seemed easier to use for a non-programmer. A lot of things are done through the GUI. Animations seem easier to handle for sure. The Unity tutorial was also more written for someone that hasn't coded much as it explained what specifically the code was doing (so I assume more resources for Unity will be helpful in that way that perhaps Godot will not).

      For Godot, GScript was easier to use than C#, but I do feel like it was easier to get my head around prefabs in Unity than the Node system in Godot. The Godot tutorial took almost twice as long as the Unity one, but I don't know if that's because Godot is more difficult or the combination of the Godot tutorial being more thorough (I feel like I mad an actual, if very uncomplicated game, plus I did Godot first, which probably helped me just learn more about scripting and thinking like a programmer that I took into Unity). The node/scene system seemed more difficult to get my head around than game objects and prefabs. That said, my Godot program felt very tight. There weren't things happening that I was having a tough time explaining or figuring out why they weren't working quite right, at least at the graphical level (this might have more to do with the Godot tutorial using 8-bit graphics and Unity using a more modern sprite look). Having the scripts in the editor meant I never ran into a case like in Unity where I couldn't attach code to a game object because it was failing to compile, but it was failing to compile because it wasn't attached to a game object (that headache took at least a half an hour to sort out).

      Overall, I was able to finish both tutorials mostly understanding what the code I was given was doing and was able to edit it to get some different affects and kind of just play around. So, on that level, I'd say they're about equal.

      One big thing I want for sure out of the engine we use is to be able to handle a lot of conversations and variables there from. We're hoping to make a "choices matter" (TM) game, and very story/dialog heavy. Ink seems like a good plug-in to do this in Unity, but implementation doesn't seem easy (though I did find a pretty good looking tutorial that may help de-mystify). Godot seems to have some assets available for handling dialog trees, but i haven't had a chance to really dig in to them yet. So, that could definitely be a decider for me: which engine has assets that make a dialog/choice heavy game easier to make.

      While I had originally thought about making a tactics RPG for this project, looking around at both the Godot and Unity scenes, it seems like few people are making these types of projects that are giving out free advice on how to make them work in those engines. After talking with my team (I have a team!, see my post from a while back), it seemed like a good idea both to keep the game within the scope of a novice, but still tell the story we wanted, to do a skill role system instead. Since this came from a tabletop session anyway, seemed to make the most sense to do skill rolls rather than develop a whole combat system.

      TL;DR - Looking for advice on which engine, between Godot and Unity, would be handle a 2D RPG that relies on a lot of dialog and choices along with skill rolls for the gameplay. Thanks in advance!

      11 votes
    8. Any interest in putting together a Tildes Best of 2020 music roundup?

      The final results would look something like this. Ours here wouldn't be tailored to obscure music like that though, just the best albums of the year with no other qualifications. There hasn't been...

      The final results would look something like this.

      Ours here wouldn't be tailored to obscure music like that though, just the best albums of the year with no other qualifications. There hasn't been one on reddit since 2017, you can find the 2011-2017 sets in the archive. The first one was just me putting up 15 albums. I believe the highest number we ever hit was 287 albums. It's heartening when the artists show up to thank you for shining a light on their little corner of the music world, too. A good list is good press for Tildes, it'll make the rounds.

      Frankly, the people who were instrumental in those roundups are here on Tildes now, so hitting past 300 isn't outside the realm of possibility, not that we need to get that extreme (it's just fun). There are several new type two listeners here too, so potentially we've already got more music lovers and more help here than we've had doing the previous set. General input from tens of thousands of people like you see on reddit isn't as important to this process as the hardcore music lovers, we'd get like 3 solid recs out of 1000 comments, and small/forgotten /r/letstalkmusic always kicked everyone else's ass when it came to album picks.

      These things can be rather a lot of work, which is why they are hard to do. It's not the playlists that eat up the time, though - it's collecting all of the albums and getting enough ears on them to give them the stamp of approval for the final list. The way to make that easier is to get started on it early and spread the work out over several months. That way come November you're looking for late releases and overlooked gems rather than panicking and trying to do it all in a single week. Been there, that's the worst.

      The way we'd do it before, we'd run roundup threads on reddit periodically (in several different subs) then sift the comments for album recommendations, listen to them to see if they passed muster. That's hardly necessary on Tildes, especially with the long-lived threads here that bump with activity and never truly lock. We also used a google docs spreadsheet so we could tally everyone's votes up, but that was a major pain in the ass I'd like to skip. Tildes' own votes should be more than enough, and exemplary tags can highlight the must-listen set that goes at the top.

      I think the best way to do it is put up a collection thread that everyone who is interested can then bookmark or ignore, and then drop albums in the comments between now and mid-November. No, not in this thread, I'll post a thread for it during the first week of October. We just let that roll and keep dumping new albums into it, listening, and leaving comments there. Come late November I can whip that into a set of playlists in a weekend, that's the easy part.

      I enjoy doing this because it's been my experience that most music publications would rather argue about what numerical order the same 50 albums should be in than round up all of the best and let the listeners decide for themselves. They also have an incentive to pimp bands that are industry darlings or that they are being paid to boost in the recommendations. We don't.

      So, are you folks interested in getting the ball rolling on this in October? Leave a comment if you are interested in contributing (even if it's just a single album) so we can get a sense of how many people are down for this before we get started. If there isn't enough interest we can try again next year. I'd also like to invite the folks who have done this before to share their experiences, you know who you are. ;)

      18 votes
    9. I have a preliminary plan that will change with feedback from others here

      I'd like to preface my self by saying that I am in no way trying to spam ~music. My intention is to get this space rolling as much as I can based on the recent survey that Tildes is perceived to...

      I'd like to preface my self by saying that I am in no way trying to spam ~music. My intention is to get this space rolling as much as I can based on the recent survey that Tildes is perceived to be STEM heavy/leaning.

      Thus, I will be posting a lot of links to music that I believe is interesting to the general listener.

      The possibilities of this space are endless IMO and I hope to positively contribute to it.

      14 votes