tempestoftruth's recent activity

  1. Comment on Would anyone like to learn Spanish with me? in ~talk

    tempestoftruth
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    Unrelated to the thread topic, but love to see Animorphs fans in the wild :)

    Unrelated to the thread topic, but love to see Animorphs fans in the wild :)

  2. Comment on Trump has signed a $2,000,000,000,000 stimulus bill, along with many other leaders in their respective nations in ~finance

    tempestoftruth
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    I don't really have much to add to your comment, but I just wanted to echo your sentiment. I really wish we lived in a world where the things you're describing are our reality. I'm still in...

    I don't really have much to add to your comment, but I just wanted to echo your sentiment. I really wish we lived in a world where the things you're describing are our reality. I'm still in school, but I want the focus of my efforts to be on creating that more just and egalitarian society.

    I would quit my job in a heartbeat if I could make the same living working a farm. It's a hell of a lot more important, ane it's a travesty that farm workers make a fraction of what I do.

    I've gotten so much pressure from family and friends to pursue jobs whose occupants are frequently labeled as "successful," even though many of those jobs just don't contribute to society, or are actively detrimental (see consulting and how they influence companies into firing workers, making labor conditions worse, exploiting cheap foreign labor). When I tell them I want to do things that build up community (not necessarily local sustainable farming but on that same scale), they're horrified that I would give up my shot to make tons of money and/or earn incredible prestige in a professional career like law or academia, even though the former is so much more vitally important than the latter.

    There's a great quote by David Orr that I (ironically) found at my university:

    “The plain fact is that the planet does not need more successful people. But it does desperately need more peacemakers, healers, restorers, storytellers, and lovers of every kind. It needs people who live well in their places. It needs people of moral courage willing to join the fight to make the world habitable and humane. And these qualities have little to do with success as we have defined it.”

    4 votes
  3. Comment on Why Democratic leaders still misunderstand the politics of social class in ~news

    tempestoftruth
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    So I'm not arguing that we eliminate global trade, what I'm saying is that we need to radically reorganize the way global trade is conducted in such a way that the downsides of the current system...

    So I'm not arguing that we eliminate global trade, what I'm saying is that we need to radically reorganize the way global trade is conducted in such a way that the downsides of the current system are eliminated while focusing on what global trade can offer every community.

    I mention agriculture because that's a really strong example of the current system's weakness. It's often cheaper for companies to produce a product in A and transport it to B using trucks, than it is to produce in B and sell it there. It would never be cheaper to do this, however, if the company had to pay for the emissions it produces when transporting from A to B. Food is an example of something most communities can simply make themselves, and where extra supplies are needed or products that only grow in certain areas are desired, then trade can fill that gap. That's what global trade should do, let us try things from other places in small, reasonable quantities, and help us make ends meet, as opposed to bringing us literal tons of commodities that either we don't buy or buy and then throw away, all while the people being made to produce those commodities get paid pennies on the hour.

    2 votes
  4. Comment on Tesla remotely disables Autopilot on used Model S after it was sold in ~tech

    tempestoftruth
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    Seems like the kind of issue consumers will always come up against when it comes to corporations and proprietary software. The work that's being put into self-driving cars should be made...

    Seems like the kind of issue consumers will always come up against when it comes to corporations and proprietary software. The work that's being put into self-driving cars should be made open-source, not just because it would make the process safer and more transparent, but also because it would prevent ridiculous abuses like this one, where you can't even sell a product you purchased because technically the company still owns the software inside it and gets to decide who uses it. People should be able to own the things they purchase outright.

    Reminds me of this headline from a while back: https://www.wired.com/2015/04/dmca-ownership-john-deere/

    28 votes
  5. Comment on Why Democratic leaders still misunderstand the politics of social class in ~news

    tempestoftruth
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    I don't really see where I contradicted this claim that you seem to be correcting me on?

    I don't really see where I contradicted this claim that you seem to be correcting me on?

    1 vote
  6. Comment on Why Democratic leaders still misunderstand the politics of social class in ~news

    tempestoftruth
    Link Parent
    Why are the commodities produced by the global supply chain so cheap? It's probably because the people who produce the commodities are not being paid a living wage. The environmental damage caused...

    Why are the commodities produced by the global supply chain so cheap? It's probably because the people who produce the commodities are not being paid a living wage. The environmental damage caused by such mass production is also not reflected in the price we pay at the store. Some people are necessarily excluded from the global supply chain because in order for the global supply chain to function, cheap labor is necessary and paying those people a reasonable wage would make the current system infeasible (rich CEOs are not willing to change the system to where they make less money in order to spread the wealth to their workers).

    I would also strongly question your claim that we "depend on the efficient production of both commonly available and many specialty goods for both our survival and much of what makes life enjoyable," or at least ask that individuals who share this belief to re-examine it in light of the way global production of commodities is carried out at the expense of the most vulnerable.

    Since most people ask me "what is the alternative" when I explain my position on the issue, I'll go ahead and talk a bit about that. I believe in self-sufficient communities that are capable of providing the vast majority of their sustenance by themselves. If production is local, you eliminate costs associated with CO2 emissions from transportation and the people can determine how things are produced and ensure no exploitative practices are going on. With regards to happiness, I think most people would be much happier living in one of these supportive and connected communities than they currently are now. In such a community, individuals would have a clear impact on the people around them and their work would be immediately meaningful, instilling a sense of responsibility and a life purpose which is more fulfilling than what most people are experiencing in late capitalism (or whatever you want to call it).

    2 votes
  7. Comment on Why Democratic leaders still misunderstand the politics of social class in ~news

    tempestoftruth
    Link Parent
    This isn't a problem with Marxist thought, this is a problem with capitalism, and specifically neoliberalism, which Marxism is analyzing. When every single aspect of society is being run using...

    But all anyone wants to fixate on is what you need to learn to be a better producing/consuming animal. This is the problem with the fixation on pure materialism that hardline Marxists have.

    This isn't a problem with Marxist thought, this is a problem with capitalism, and specifically neoliberalism, which Marxism is analyzing. When every single aspect of society is being run using market logic and all the things around us are being transformed into commodities, of course Marxists (and everyone else) are going to discuss how society is pressuring us to become better at producing and more desperate for consumption.

    3 votes
  8. Comment on Why Democratic leaders still misunderstand the politics of social class in ~news

    tempestoftruth
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    Right, but some of these people that we currently define as "beyond college age" because it would be impossible for them to pay for and attend college AND support their families AND work a job,...

    It wouldn't be "pretty much everyone" because most people are beyond college age and probably aren't going to go back to school.

    Right, but some of these people that we currently define as "beyond college age" because it would be impossible for them to pay for and attend college AND support their families AND work a job, would potentially be willing to go to school even in their 30s and 40s (and possibly even older folk) if it means they could improve their standard of living or if it was just something they had always wanted to do. It's important to note it still leaves people who are so poor that whether or not they attend (free) college would be a matter of time and not money.

    The lump sum approach would be useful for people absolutely, giving them a bit of a safety net as they enter a point in which they are expected to provide for themselves. Important to note that misses individuals who don't finish high school, presumably because they needed to start working to support themselves or their family.

    3 votes
  9. Comment on Death Note Oneshot Special - Discussion Thread in ~anime

    tempestoftruth
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    Unfair that they killed him at the end, you can't change the rules and then enforce them after the fact. I like how even though the protagonist dies, he made a positive impact on people's lives,...

    Unfair that they killed him at the end, you can't change the rules and then enforce them after the fact. I like how even though the protagonist dies, he made a positive impact on people's lives, and so this time around the Death Note brought some good to the world.

    Was an fun read overall! Normally I'd be skeptical of this kind of thing (should just let original stories end where they do instead of milking them), but it made the commentary that it did in a short and enjoyable way.

    6 votes
  10. Comment on Why Democratic leaders still misunderstand the politics of social class in ~news

    tempestoftruth
    Link Parent
    Man, that's a really shitty story. I'm sorry to hear it. I had absolutely awful teachers in elementary school who would do the same things, calling me out in particular for things everyone else...

    Man, that's a really shitty story. I'm sorry to hear it. I had absolutely awful teachers in elementary school who would do the same things, calling me out in particular for things everyone else was doing, always trying to get me in trouble with the administration, and so on. It was unbearable, and although it got better in middle and high school from the teachers themselves the administrators continued to be discriminatory whenever I had the displeasure of encountering them.

    7 votes
  11. Comment on Why Democratic leaders still misunderstand the politics of social class in ~news

    tempestoftruth
    Link Parent
    Yeah, agreed. I know you're just stating this, and so my comments from here on out aren't directed specifically at you, but rather just general thoughts, if anyone else would be interested in...

    a rambling article

    Yeah, agreed.

    the main point is that big programs to help college-goers might not look so good to people who didn't go to college, and that's a huge percentage of the electorate. Why should college-goers get extra help when they make more money (on average)?

    I know you're just stating this, and so my comments from here on out aren't directed specifically at you, but rather just general thoughts, if anyone else would be interested in discussing further. The quoted section seems similar to these new anxieties about college for all programs bankrolling the college attendance of the children of the rich.

    I think Bernie's focused on making college more accessible as well, expanding the group of people we would normally define as "college students" (from middle- and upper-class high school grads to pretty much everyone), and so therefore the help targeted at the group "college students" will be helping more than just who it traditionally would be helping. Also, a lot of college grads aren't doing better financially than their non-educated counterparts, I think the United States higher education system is at the point where it's not a financial no-brainer to invest in a bachelor's degree at a university to maximize your overall lifetime earnings. Not only is it not guaranteed to make you more money over your lifetime, even if it does, if you're saddled with student debt for twenty or thirty years, you probably didn't get to enjoy much of your life, if at all. It's different if you're graduating from an elite university with a degree in finance or consulting, but the vast majority of people aren't graduating from these schools (I assume) which generally will have far less lucrative prospects. So I don't think this reform is necessarily wrongheaded, especially when it's comparatively a sideshow to the other, far more important rallying cries of the growing leftist movement (fight for $15, M4A, etc.).

    5 votes
  12. Comment on Why Democratic leaders still misunderstand the politics of social class in ~news

    tempestoftruth
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    I've been mostly skimming, but I'm confused on what this author believes he and Bernie have different opinions on. He seems to accuse Bernie of being like the rest of the democratic establishment...

    I've been mostly skimming, but I'm confused on what this author believes he and Bernie have different opinions on. He seems to accuse Bernie of being like the rest of the democratic establishment in pushing the importance of "college for all." Instead, the author suggests that a radical democratization of education and the workplace is more important. But the goal of democratic socialism is - you guessed it - to democratize society in a fundamental way by eliminating power disparities in places like schools, universities, and workplaces. I believe Bernie represents this radical change the most of all the candidates, indicated by numerous endorsements from groups seeking radical social change towards democratization. So why is the author a Warren supporter? Seems somewhat inconsistent to me (although that may just be the tendency of socialists to find the positions of social democrats incomprehensible).

    Some other things I wanted to point out:

    [extra college graduates with these business degrees] supervise the working class—all of it, white, black, and brown. So if everyone in the working class did go to college—and thank God that they don’t—there’d be no one left to supervise. In other words: A college education is valuable to the extent other people are not getting one. But of course, we’re not supposed to think about such a thing. 


    Douglas’s findings illustrate what happens to children whose parents are stuck in authoritarian workplaces where they learn to take orders and pass on that culture to their children. In short, they raise their children in the same way that they experience their working lives.

    These are great observations (or inclusions, I suppose, in the case of the latter). The way the system is currently designed, some people have to be on the bottom. Manufacturing of poverty and all that. The examination of generational inequality and the way that is passed down is super insightful here as well. The most terrifying part of it is that I recognize that pattern in my parents and myself.

    EDIT:

    Co-determination, if it is to work, needs a strong labor movement outside of that corporate structure to prevent it from being co-opted.

    He even says a strong labor movement outside of the corporate structure is required for true democratization of the workplace? The only candidate with a movement outside of the corporate structure right now is Bernie?

    14 votes
  13. Comment on In a break with convention, the New York Times editorial board has chosen to endorse two separate Democratic candidates for president: Amy Klobuchar and Elizabeth Warren in ~news

    tempestoftruth
    Link Parent
    Sorry, how is people rising up toxic at all? Legislators are no longer representative of the constituencies most of them have been elected to advocate for, they've mostly been captured to instead...

    evolves around a "political revolution" of people rising up to hold their legislators to account. Most politicians don't make the most toxic elements of fan bases the center-pieces of their campaign and political agenda

    Sorry, how is people rising up toxic at all? Legislators are no longer representative of the constituencies most of them have been elected to advocate for, they've mostly been captured to instead fight for the interests of corporations and the elites. A majority of the population supports Medicare for All, but among politicians, the idea is reprehensible. If you ask me, that is what is toxic. This tension between the governing and governed needs to be resolved, and Bernie (and more importantly the people of this country) are making it happen.

    the Sanders campaign wants to tout its active and engaged fan base as an organizing and campaign strength. But any time it's inconvenient for optics

    When would a mobilized grassroots base of support ever be bad for optics? Like I said, every politician is going to have supporters that you personally find intolerable or annoying, it doesn't mean that you can paint the whole base with a broad brush because of a few of them (or at least you can, but it's not true).

    Klobuchar, for example, is actually quite boring and relies on support from pragmatists who just want a stable person who quietly gets shit done and doesn't draw too much attention to themselves.

    Point taken, but I'd argue these people are just as forceful in their support for "establishment, anyone who won't rock the boat too much" even though that position tends to be associated with centrism and thus is never viewed as "extreme", regardless of the strength with which those people advocate their views. In other words, you accuse Bernie supporters of being "blinkered fans" when I might say that Klobuchar voters are "blinkered fans" of keeping things exactly the way they are, which Klobuchar's candidacy and platform represent.

    ideal fan-base for a politicians should be people who are engaged and active, but also generally positive, courteous, and polite

    But there's a crisis going on? People are dying because they don't have healthcare? If there ever was a time to ask politely (which frankly I don't think there was), it is long gone and we need to act now.

    16 votes
  14. Comment on In a break with convention, the New York Times editorial board has chosen to endorse two separate Democratic candidates for president: Amy Klobuchar and Elizabeth Warren in ~news

    tempestoftruth
    Link Parent
    Yes, and every politician has die-hard supporters who will defend them tooth and nail. Not a phenomenon unique to Bernie.

    all his most blinkered fans seem to think "Leftism" begins and ends with a personality cult around Bernie Sanders

    Yes, and every politician has die-hard supporters who will defend them tooth and nail. Not a phenomenon unique to Bernie.

    14 votes
  15. Comment on How do you people at universities handle your notes? in ~talk

    tempestoftruth
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    I take my notes by hand (unless I don't have paper available), and I do so for most of the reasons Death outlines in his post. You are more likely to remember what it is that you've written, and...

    I take my notes by hand (unless I don't have paper available), and I do so for most of the reasons Death outlines in his post. You are more likely to remember what it is that you've written, and because you can't copy as quickly, you are forced to decide what information is the most important and prioritize taking that down over anything else. If I feel like studying, what that usually looks like is going back over my notes and re-organizing them in a way that presents the most important information in the shortest length possible, creating a kind of cheat sheet you can use and look at right before the exam. Doing this soon after you've taken the notes is important, otherwise you'll forget the context of some of the things you've written and it won't be as comprehensive a review. Most of the time, though, just handwriting all my notes is enough for me to remember what I need to remember for my exams. I've had years of practice doing just that though, and I tend to have a good memory, so it may not work so well for you.

    3 votes
  16. Comment on Windows 7 support has ended in ~tech

    tempestoftruth
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    Yeah, as reasonable as I think it is to deprecate old operating systems so that organizations can just move on, the jump from Windows 7 to Windows 10 is genuinely terrible, I hate Windows 10 with...

    Yeah, as reasonable as I think it is to deprecate old operating systems so that organizations can just move on, the jump from Windows 7 to Windows 10 is genuinely terrible, I hate Windows 10 with a passion. I think if you're genuinely interested in keeping yourself safe you can't keeping using Windows 7 though, mentioned in another comment that I have a Windows 7 device myself that I will probably be migrating over to Linux.

    Maybe there'll be a community effort like there was on XP for a community driven service pack to try and maintain things themselves.

    Oh wow, I had no idea about this. Given that Windows 7, while better than Windows 10, is still sending telemetry, and Linux development teams are already working on maintaining their operating systems, it doesn't seem super worth it.

    And yeah you can still upgrade for free even though that's "ended"

    Do you know how, exactly? Is it through Windows Update or do you need software that's available somewhere?

    1 vote
  17. Comment on Windows 7 support has ended in ~tech

    tempestoftruth
    (edited )
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    Interesting, I actually have a Windows 7 device myself that I was going to swap over to Linux now that support has ended, because I read on the Microsoft website that the upgrade wasn't free...

    Interesting, I actually have a Windows 7 device myself that I was going to swap over to Linux now that support has ended, because I read on the Microsoft website that the upgrade wasn't free anymore. Given all the issues with Windows 10 we've been discussing in the thread I will probably still swap to Ubuntu but we'll see, family will be using it as well who are much less computer-literate than I am.

    3 votes
  18. Comment on Windows 7 support has ended in ~tech

    tempestoftruth
    Link Parent
    It's my understanding that they stopped offering the free upgrade years ago. It should also be said that just because the update was free doesn't mean the decision wasn't made to increase profits...

    It's my understanding that they stopped offering the free upgrade years ago. It should also be said that just because the update was free doesn't mean the decision wasn't made to increase profits -- Windows 10 has integrated advertising, Cortana, and more sophisticated tracking of users to enhance profiling, to name just a few reasons why Microsoft might want to force this software onto most people.

    12 votes
  19. Comment on Year of the Planet, Environmental Activism, and Us in ~enviro

    tempestoftruth
    Link Parent
    Sounds great! We can provide more feedback during the process as well.

    Sounds great! We can provide more feedback during the process as well.

    2 votes
  20. Comment on App tracking alert in iOS 13 has dramatically cut location data flow to ad industry in ~tech

    tempestoftruth
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    The short answer is, what they offer in terms of privacy is fine for the average user. The long answer is it depends on what your threat model looks like. Unless Apple made all of their source...

    is Apple's current prioritization of privacy genuine or mostly marketing?

    The short answer is, what they offer in terms of privacy is fine for the average user. The long answer is it depends on what your threat model looks like.

    Unless Apple made all of their source code open for viewing, there's no way to verify whether or not their claims about privacy are true. There's a few things we do know; for example, placing a password on your iPhone will encrypt the device and make its contents inaccessible without the password. Because this feature is the default implementation, it's an effective security feature for iPhone users. I use a decently long alphanumeric password for security reasons (and to prevent police officers from ordering me to open my device in the event that occurs).

    Generally, unless you can verify these things yourself or you can trust a third-party audit of the software in question, you shouldn't trust that it's keeping you secure or private. Because of my priorities (and also what I look for in phone design) I'm fine using an Apple product, but if your threat model does not allow for Apple possibly spying on your activities (e.g. reading your Notes app or tracking keystrokes) then you should not use one.

    My personal opinion, which you can take with a grain of salt, is that all their noise about privacy is meaningless unless they were to open all their source code in order to verify that what they say is true.

    3 votes