7 votes

Why do USB-C hubs still have USB 2.0 ports?

Tags: hardware, usb, hubs

5 comments

  1. Greg
    Link
    That’s cool! I always forget that internal “devices” are still more than likely hooked up to the USB chip as well, but it makes total sense when laid out like that. Oof, I just aged a decade.

    That’s cool! I always forget that internal “devices” are still more than likely hooked up to the USB chip as well, but it makes total sense when laid out like that.

    USB 2.0 is over 20 years old

    Oof, I just aged a decade.

    3 votes
  2. [2]
    skybrian
    Link
    Looking just at the power requirements, I'm wondering how USB hubs without a power adapter ever worked. USB-2 provides 500 milliamps so how do you get four times that much for a four-port adapter?...

    Looking just at the power requirements, I'm wondering how USB hubs without a power adapter ever worked. USB-2 provides 500 milliamps so how do you get four times that much for a four-port adapter?

    I think the answer might be "it didn't work very well?"

    It seems like a USB 2 hub powered by a USB-C connector that negotiates more power would be a nice way to go for portability, if you don't want a separate power adapter? Maybe USB-C is more of an addition than a replacement.

    2 votes
    1. vord
      Link Parent
      Most devices back then didn't draw much power from the hub. Anything with even slightly larger draw would have a seperate power supply.

      Most devices back then didn't draw much power from the hub. Anything with even slightly larger draw would have a seperate power supply.

      2 votes
  3. [2]
    Akir
    Link
    I would think the more obvious answer is that there are still millions of devices that use the USB-A plug and it's far more convenient to have it built into your hub than to require an additional...

    I would think the more obvious answer is that there are still millions of devices that use the USB-A plug and it's far more convenient to have it built into your hub than to require an additional dongle.

    1. Greg
      (edited )
      Link Parent
      USB 3 still commonly uses a type A connector, and I believe it predates the C connector entirely (although of course type C connectors also can and do carry the various USB 3 signals). The...

      USB 3 still commonly uses a type A connector, and I believe it predates the C connector entirely (although of course type C connectors also can and do carry the various USB 3 signals). The difference is that USB 2 caps out at 480Mbps whereas USB 3 is between 10x and 40x faster, depending which confusingly-named variant of it you’re using. If you see blue type A ports that’s a signifier that they’re USB 3.

      [Edit] The original USB 3.0 standard was released in 2008 and the USB-C connector came in 2014 - bigger gap than I thought!

      2 votes