13 votes

Dos and don'ts in open source

3 comments

  1. shx
    Link
    I agree with a lot of what this article says. From personal experience, I find the biggest concern I have when contributing to a project is knowing that, often, people will be dismissive and rude....

    I agree with a lot of what this article says. From personal experience, I find the biggest concern I have when contributing to a project is knowing that, often, people will be dismissive and rude. I'm still rather fresh in the OSS scene, and it's been hard to get over that. I've wasted so much time writing and rewriting, hoping that a person I respect won't decide to eviscerate a comment I made.

    What I like about Tildes is that it is polite by default. I don't have to establish myself or read over my words a dozen times to ensure people will offer me basic respect.

    9 votes
  2. [2]
    cfabbro
    Link
    Solid advice IMO. And a fair bit of it seems to be applicable to almost all online interactions too, not just for managing an open source project.

    Solid advice IMO. And a fair bit of it seems to be applicable to almost all online interactions too, not just for managing an open source project.

    5 votes
    1. MacGuges
      Link Parent
      True dat, but I'm inclined to say the rules for good social interactions are valuable enough yet troublesome enough that periodic restatements for each new context are a good pattern to follow.

      True dat, but I'm inclined to say the rules for good social interactions are valuable enough yet troublesome enough that periodic restatements for each new context are a good pattern to follow.

      5 votes