7 votes

It's not what programming languages do, it's what they shepherd you to

2 comments

  1. joplin
    Link
    I've found this to be very true. Back in the 90s I was using a lot of MFC on Windows and CodeWarrior PowerPlant on MacOS. They were reasonably good MVC architectures for building windowed apps. I...

    I've found this to be very true. Back in the 90s I was using a lot of MFC on Windows and CodeWarrior PowerPlant on MacOS. They were reasonably good MVC architectures for building windowed apps. I was fresh out of school with a CS degree, but I still felt like there was something I wasn't getting about it. When I started using Cocoa for OS X, it all clicked. It was just so well put together, it made the patterns that were used by all 3 of them much more clear and understandable.

    To put it another way – I was able to use MFC and PowerPlant, but I couldn't have taken their ideas and built my own thing that worked in a similar way. But after using Cocoa, I could. (And yes, I realize that none of those 3 are languages, they're frameworks. Regardless, it's a similar issue.)

    3 votes
  2. Akir
    Link
    I made a comment about this a little while ago: https://tildes.net/~comp/m88/i_want_off_mr_golangs_wild_ride#comment-4nqv I'll admit I was amused at the Java comment though. The most popular Java...

    I made a comment about this a little while ago:

    https://tildes.net/~comp/m88/i_want_off_mr_golangs_wild_ride#comment-4nqv

    I'll admit I was amused at the Java comment though. The most popular Java framework is Spring (at least it was while I was still in that world), which at it's most basic level is designed specifically for Inversion of Control - in other words, to break the OOP pattern of writing and instantiating classes.

    2 votes