12 votes

LCH colors in CSS: what, why, and how?

Tags: css, color, web

5 comments

  1. ThatFanficGuy
    Link
    Lovely! I've heard about LCH before, but it was dream-talk back then. Now that it's incoming... Time to check my options I picked HSL up a couple of years ago because it made more sense than RGB...

    Lovely! I've heard about LCH before, but it was dream-talk back then. Now that it's incoming... Time to check my options

    I picked HSL up a couple of years ago because it made more sense than RGB or the Hex notation: I could meaningfully adjust colors without having to resort to third-party tools. LCH gives me, a web designer, the tools to make both the design and the process that much more meaningful further.

    4 votes
  2. [3]
    joplin
    Link
    This looks interesting, but I wonder if it's just going to confuse users/developers. (It's probably a step in the right direction, though.) sRGB and its hue/saturation variants are well-known for...

    This looks interesting, but I wonder if it's just going to confuse users/developers. (It's probably a step in the right direction, though.) sRGB and its hue/saturation variants are well-known for some colors being able to be much more saturated than others. LCH is supposed make colors much more perceptually similar when they have similar settings. But then it leaves a typical user thinking, "Why can I make this yellow have a saturation of 120%, but I can't make the blue more saturated than 100%?" Or, if they limit everything to the 0-1 range, "Why can my computer display more saturated colors, but I can't actually make any of them?" I'm not sure there's a great solution here other than having a wider gamut become the standard. But I don't know how likely that is to happen any time soon.

    A also wonder if the WC3 will make this work properly in P3 and wider gamuts now that some browsers are supporting them?

    3 votes
    1. [2]
      ThatFanficGuy
      Link Parent
      I think the idea here is not for a general user: it's for a designer who may be developing a design system, where consistency and similar tone are important.

      I think the idea here is not for a general user: it's for a designer who may be developing a design system, where consistency and similar tone are important.

      5 votes
      1. joplin
        Link Parent
        I'll be interested to see how it works out!

        I'll be interested to see how it works out!

  3. Greg
    Link
    I misread the title as LHC colours and went in expecting an article about CERN's design language. Obviously I got something completely different, but I still learned several new things from it...

    I misread the title as LHC colours and went in expecting an article about CERN's design language. Obviously I got something completely different, but I still learned several new things from it that I hadn't even realised I didn't know. Good post all round, really!

    1 vote