17 votes

The lost potential of Windows Subsystem for Linux

6 comments

  1. [3]
    JXM
    Link
    I totally get the main thrust of this article, which is that WSL isn’t nearly as tied in to the Windows side of things as it could be. They could be much more intertwined. But for me, a totally...

    I totally get the main thrust of this article, which is that WSL isn’t nearly as tied in to the Windows side of things as it could be. They could be much more intertwined.

    But for me, a totally casual user that just wants to run a few Linux scripts that I use for video converting, it’s a godsend. It means I don’t have to run a Linux VM or install a second OS just for the few scripts that I want to run. It opens up a whole new world of tooling that I’d have been way less likely to use without WSL.

    8 votes
    1. [2]
      tindall
      Link Parent
      Yeah, I don't think they're saying it's bad. Just that it could be much more useful.

      Yeah, I don't think they're saying it's bad. Just that it could be much more useful.

      4 votes
      1. JXM
        Link Parent
        Absolutely. I’m just saying that for someone like me, who only needs it for one or two things on an occasional basis, it’s super helpful.

        Absolutely. I’m just saying that for someone like me, who only needs it for one or two things on an occasional basis, it’s super helpful.

        4 votes
  2. tesseractcat
    Link
    I remember being confused when they announced WSL 2 being a VM, because it seemed like a step back from their initial vision. I'm glad that someone else thinks that too.

    I remember being confused when they announced WSL 2 being a VM, because it seemed like a step back from their initial vision. I'm glad that someone else thinks that too.

    7 votes
  3. vord
    Link
    WSL is what makes using my work computer bearable. That said, it's definitely wonky compared to native linux, and often using a natively-compiled busybox makes more sense.

    WSL is what makes using my work computer bearable. That said, it's definitely wonky compared to native linux, and often using a natively-compiled busybox makes more sense.

    6 votes
  4. keb
    Link
    While WSL is nice to have for casual use, I personally have never got WSL1 or WSL2 working to a satisfactory level for work. I always ran into one issue or another (either compatibility,...

    While WSL is nice to have for casual use, I personally have never got WSL1 or WSL2 working to a satisfactory level for work. I always ran into one issue or another (either compatibility, performance, networking issues, etc), so I just resolved to using VirtualBox again which I find more reliable.

    3 votes