7 votes

US high-speed rail: What's next? Analyzing extensions and expansions, and what makes sense

1 comment

  1. Atvelonis
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    Ray Delahanty ("CityNerd") is a transportation planning and engineering consultant who has a YouTube channel covering city planning, transit infrastructure, and traffic management, as well as the...

    Ray Delahanty ("CityNerd") is a transportation planning and engineering consultant who has a YouTube channel covering city planning, transit infrastructure, and traffic management, as well as the mathematical processes used to make design choices. He's been a consultant on a number of infrastructure projects in the United States and seems to have a philosophy integrating many aspects of New Urbanism with the practicalities of real-world project management.

    There are a variety of urban planning YouTube channels out there, and most of them are not run by actual planners. They have their place, but I particularly enjoy Delahanty's content because it's professional and succinct; it often goes into more procedural depth than most qualitative planning video analyses; he recognizes and jokes about his own biases; and his videos aren't ideological, pretentious, or whiny. He's careful about his vocabulary in a way that non-engineers tend not to be. He also has an amusing kind of dryness that I find supremely appropriate for someone heavily engaged with traffic safety.

    This video explores the potential for a High-Speed Rail (HSR) network in the United States, with particular attention on the practical, economic feasibility of it. He discusses a potential extension of Amtrak's Acela line—which currently goes from Boston, MA to Washington, D.C.—all the way down to Atlanta, GA, analyzing the relative demand for such routes in a mathematical but still accessible way. I found it very informative!

    I'm not sure if ~design is the best category for topics about transit, but it's sort of tangentially related to urban planning, which I suppose counts as design.

    3 votes