8 votes

Carbon markets stand to reward ‘no-till’ farmers. But most are still tilling the soil.

5 comments

  1. [5]
    ImmobileVoyager
    Link
    A perfect example of what happens when complex ecosystem dynamics are crumpled together in a buzzword while also trying to preserve the markets as they were solidified by two centuries of...

    A perfect example of what happens when complex ecosystem dynamics are crumpled together in a buzzword while also trying to preserve the markets as they were solidified by two centuries of energy-intensive economy.

    As the world's population continue to grow exponentially, we need to produce exponentially more food, while briging ariculture to net-zero carbon emissions. Now in less than the span of one individual career.

    Meanwhile, albeit in a slightly longer timescale, arable soils are some of those natural resourses that are depleting fast and require conservation.

    Circles ave been squared more easily.

    4 votes
    1. [2]
      monarda
      Link Parent
      Of all the our ecological problems, I find soil depletion and water quality/depletion to be the scariest. We’re draining or have mostly drained many of our aquifers, soil is being destroyed at an...

      Of all the our ecological problems, I find soil depletion and water quality/depletion to be the scariest. We’re draining or have mostly drained many of our aquifers, soil is being destroyed at an alarming rate, and most people I talk to aren’t even aware. When I did grass fed beef, I read a book and a particular line struck me, it went something like this - I once thought of myself as a beef farmer, then I realized I was a grass farmer, then I realized I was a bug farmer. - He was talking about the soil and it’s living organisms. No matter what we farm, I think ultimately we should think about ourselves as bug farmers. Healthy soils creates just about everything else.

      6 votes
      1. ImmobileVoyager
        Link Parent
        In that book on trees, it is said that half of a heathy forest's biomass lives underground. Long ago, I read in a book by a French zoo-archeologist a tongue-in-cheek ode to the modest earhworms...

        the soil and its living organisms

        In that book on trees, it is said that half of a heathy forest's biomass lives underground.

        Long ago, I read in a book by a French zoo-archeologist a tongue-in-cheek ode to the modest earhworms that toil more earth than any plough, and to which we ought to be grateful for all the food.

        It is indeed quite straightforward for us homo industrialis to forget how dependant we are on nature and how befuddlingly intricate are the systems that bring those breakfast cereals to the table.


        on a side note, as a software engineer, I too am a bug farmer ;-)

        3 votes
    2. [2]
      spctrvl
      Link Parent
      It's still a big task to make agriculture sustainable, but thankfully population is not growing exponentially. The growth rate has been in decline since the 60's and absolute growth peaked in the...

      It's still a big task to make agriculture sustainable, but thankfully population is not growing exponentially. The growth rate has been in decline since the 60's and absolute growth peaked in the late 80's. It's now expected for population to level off at 9-11 billion and start declining thereafter.

      4 votes
      1. ImmobileVoyager
        Link Parent
        11 billions is 3 billions more than today, and those 3 billions are twice the Earth population as it was at the start of last century. Most of those three billons will be, are being born in parts...

        11 billions is 3 billions more than today, and those 3 billions are twice the Earth population as it was at the start of last century.

        Most of those three billons will be, are being born in parts of the world where "development" still is touted as emulating the euro-american way of life, with all the associated emissions and looting of resources.

        We'd be lucky to reach the global demographic inversion point before mass depopulation events such as the famines, epidemies and wars that usually come with too many empty stomachs. Said inversion may very well come sooner than expected : not thanks to the progress of birth control, but rather to a regression of death control back to pre-industrial levels.

        Indeed, this curve is more linear than exponential. That gradient, though …