8 votes

Up to 40% of retail stores in Finland could go bust by 2030 – competition from online retailers will bring major upheaval

9 comments

  1. [8]
    vakieh
    Link
    Replace 'Finland' with 'World' and you wouldn't need to change anything else in that title. Is this a surprise to anyone?

    Replace 'Finland' with 'World' and you wouldn't need to change anything else in that title. Is this a surprise to anyone?

    6 votes
    1. [7]
      chembliss
      Link Parent
      I'm divided about that. I surely prefer a small, local shop with good quality products and nice owners, but that's very often not the case, at least for me. Instead I get a small shop with the...

      I'm divided about that. I surely prefer a small, local shop with good quality products and nice owners, but that's very often not the case, at least for me. Instead I get a small shop with the same products you would see on Amazon (or even AliExpress), just 5x more expensive, and owners that seem almost bothered that you're there.

      That's why I'm faithful to a couple of very good, small retail stores, but everything else I buy online or in malls.

      5 votes
      1. [4]
        Octofox
        Link Parent
        For a lot of stores this does seem to be the case but I have found some to provide real value. All the local bike shops I have visited provide a lot of extra value over online. I can just walk in...

        For a lot of stores this does seem to be the case but I have found some to provide real value. All the local bike shops I have visited provide a lot of extra value over online. I can just walk in to a shop with my bike and describe a problem and they will take a look and tell me what needs to be done and often the solution doesn't involve buying anything from them. The service is so valuable that when I do need to buy something I get it from the store even though I could find the same thing online.

        4 votes
        1. MimicSquid
          Link Parent
          As someone who has multiple friends in bike shops, they're a special case. Bike manufacturers prioritize selling to bike shops over making bikes available online because the shops will assemble...

          As someone who has multiple friends in bike shops, they're a special case. Bike manufacturers prioritize selling to bike shops over making bikes available online because the shops will assemble the bike (which is shipped unassembled and takes a professional to assemble), help you pick the right bike for you and make sure it fits you.

          Essentially, the bike shop's service is vital to the process of getting people on a bike and nothing online could replicate that.

          3 votes
        2. chembliss
          Link Parent
          Yes, that's my experience too with the few retail shops I like. One of them sells dried up medicinal plants (and not pre-packaged!), and the woman there is very knowledgeable about them, and very...

          Yes, that's my experience too with the few retail shops I like. One of them sells dried up medicinal plants (and not pre-packaged!), and the woman there is very knowledgeable about them, and very nice and helpful. I surely prefer that to buying gel caps of an extract of unknown quality and effectivity online, and even if I find something similar at a better price it's just a better experience to buy it in the shop.

          2 votes
        3. vakieh
          Link Parent
          Unfortunately there's a concept in economics called the tragedy of the commons that while not a perfect fit does apply here. You are in the rarity. The reason shops like this get burned and close...

          often the solution doesn't involve buying anything from them

          when I do need to buy something I get it from the store even though I could find the same thing online

          Unfortunately there's a concept in economics called the tragedy of the commons that while not a perfect fit does apply here. You are in the rarity. The reason shops like this get burned and close down is most people don't behave like this. They go in for advice, get it for free, then turn around and buy something based on that advice for 10% off from the web. I've even seen web stores recommend certain local shops for advice on the things you purchase from them!

          2 votes
      2. [2]
        vakieh
        Link Parent
        I'd prefer that too, but the economics of that just don't work. If they were selling quality products they would need to charge so much they wouldn't have enough customers, and that increases the...

        I'd prefer that too, but the economics of that just don't work. If they were selling quality products they would need to charge so much they wouldn't have enough customers, and that increases the amount they would need to charge, which would reduce their customers, etc etc etc. The quality corner store is dead (even if some rare cases don't know it yet).

        1 vote
        1. chembliss
          Link Parent
          Well, there are some still selling quality products and having enough customers. In fact, I think quality and service are the only points in which they can beat online giants. And I'm not saying...

          Well, there are some still selling quality products and having enough customers. In fact, I think quality and service are the only points in which they can beat online giants.

          And I'm not saying I'd like every store to be like that, online buying has lots of advantages. I'm saying I'd buy more from small shops if they emphasized quality and service instead of keep thinking that their strong point is convenience, because it isn't anymore.

          To clarify: I think online shopping and small retail can coexist, but small retail will disappear completely if they don't focus in what they can do better, and it just makes sense.

          4 votes
  2. cadadr
    Link
    IDK, why would we want to preserve physical stores that sell nothing but packaged products that they are not involved at all apart from selling them? The only argument out there is giving people...

    IDK, why would we want to preserve physical stores that sell nothing but packaged products that they are not involved at all apart from selling them? The only argument out there is giving people jobs, but giving some people some artificial jobs solves nothing. Online stores save time and space. Apart from stuff that you'd want to examine first hand when buying or consult the knowledge of an on-site expert (groceries, coffee, notebooks, some other food items, clothing [yes medium t-shirts are often pixel perfect on me so I buy them online, but I'm yet to buy a pair of shoes or trousers online that I did not immediately cargo back]), most shops simply won't be able to exist soon.

    We need a proper solution for mass unemployment. It could maybe be in the form of dividing up jobs so that more people do the same job: instead of some person X working a full work week, the job is shared between two three-days part time workers. It could also be in the form of UBI, or a combination of both. IDK. The status quo of needing jobs to get needed money to get your basic needs satisfied is too primitive for the present day. It is simpler and less intensive of the resources Earth can provide us with if we move towards sharing stuff rather than selling every little piece of shit there is out there.

    3 votes