10 votes

Rumor: Microsoft is working on bringing Xbox Game Pass to Switch, including Xbox One games playable via streaming

12 comments

  1. [9]
    nothis
    Link
    Maybe I’m thinking way too far into an unpredictable future again but I’m really worried streaming might take off as some kind of end-game DRM scenario. Stream-only games would be “locked” in a...

    Maybe I’m thinking way too far into an unpredictable future again but I’m really worried streaming might take off as some kind of end-game DRM scenario. Stream-only games would be “locked” in a way no game has been before.

    2 votes
    1. [6]
      Gaywallet
      Link Parent
      Why do you think games would be stream only? Even in media where we have Netflix and whatnot, the media is still purchasable through other means.

      Why do you think games would be stream only? Even in media where we have Netflix and whatnot, the media is still purchasable through other means.

      1. [5]
        nothis
        Link Parent
        I'm not talking about this potential announcement. I'm talking about streaming taking off as a trend.

        I'm not talking about this potential announcement. I'm talking about streaming taking off as a trend.

        1. [4]
          Gaywallet
          Link Parent
          This hasn't been the case in other media streaming, such as Netflix, Hulu, etc. Why do you think gaming will go a different way?

          This hasn't been the case in other media streaming, such as Netflix, Hulu, etc. Why do you think gaming will go a different way?

          1. [3]
            nothis
            Link Parent
            Well, I think gaming is unique in how much it depends on processing power. I'm not sure we're there yet, in terms of cost efficency, but it must be tempting to sell the hardware equivalent of a...

            Well, I think gaming is unique in how much it depends on processing power. I'm not sure we're there yet, in terms of cost efficency, but it must be tempting to sell the hardware equivalent of a $50 smartphone and promise AAA games as long as you have an internet connection. It would undo system requirements altogether.

            1 vote
            1. [2]
              Gaywallet
              Link Parent
              While this isn't a bad point, I doubt this will shift the model of game production and sale on the backend. Access to AAA games through a $50 smartphone or whatever will still be the same games...

              While this isn't a bad point, I doubt this will shift the model of game production and sale on the backend. Access to AAA games through a $50 smartphone or whatever will still be the same games being sold to consumers with the hardware - so while you may not have the digital rights to the game, it'll still be held by someone, much like how Netflix is purchasing what they stream to you.

              1. nothis
                (edited )
                Link Parent
                I guess a more honest answer on my part would have been "I'm a pessimistic person by nature". ;) But you're absolutely right, license-wise, the current situation isn't very different. It's just...

                I guess a more honest answer on my part would have been "I'm a pessimistic person by nature". ;)

                But you're absolutely right, license-wise, the current situation isn't very different. It's just that you can break out in theory. I haven't pirated a game in a decade but I'm still glad DRM gets broken. I like the idea of games being out there, available in some form after being released that's out of the control of publishers. Retro gaming and emulation, and just an archive of culture. There's scenarios where big singleplayer games come and disappear completely after 10 years or so, if streaming-only services take off and it's deemed by the publishers as no longer profitable or worth archiving. That's just kinda sad.

                1 vote
    2. moocow1452
      Link Parent
      Console games are already "locked" to the console ecosystem, obvious emulator caveats being obvious. If the internet itself becomes the console, it's certainly a trade-off but I think it would be...

      Console games are already "locked" to the console ecosystem, obvious emulator caveats being obvious. If the internet itself becomes the console, it's certainly a trade-off but I think it would be an interesting one, particularly as part of a game subscription services.

    3. hamstergeddon
      Link Parent
      I think a more pressing concern is download-only options for games, movies, etc. Physical media is clearly on its way out. I bought a physical copy of a PC game a few weeks ago and instead of a...

      I think a more pressing concern is download-only options for games, movies, etc. Physical media is clearly on its way out. I bought a physical copy of a PC game a few weeks ago and instead of a disc it came with a disc-shaped piece of paper with a download key printed on it. Given relative low cost of storage/bandwidth compared to creating physical media, what's the publisher's incentive to provide a physical copy at all?

  2. [2]
    Gaywallet
    Link
    I think this is a fantastic idea for selling more games. I don't own an xbox and probably never will. If they want me to buy their exclusive games, the only way it's going to happen is through an...

    I think this is a fantastic idea for selling more games. I don't own an xbox and probably never will. If they want me to buy their exclusive games, the only way it's going to happen is through an ecosystem like this.

    Input lag from streaming is undesirable, but the recent project stream by google has shown it can be pretty minimal (at least on a computer). For certain games, I think it wouldn't entirely ruin gameplay. Having a streaming service like this so widespread would allow them to focus on furthering the technology, as well, to figure out how to minimize input delay even more through novel means.

    2 votes
    1. hungariantoast
      (edited )
      Link Parent
      Google's experiment was interesting, but they were not the first company to offer this type of service or technology successfully. Parsec, who also isn't the first to do this, is an excellent...

      the recent project stream by google has shown it can be pretty minimal

      Google's experiment was interesting, but they were not the first company to offer this type of service or technology successfully.

      Parsec, who also isn't the first to do this, is an excellent service for streaming your games across devices. It doesn't cost anything (isn't open source though), but also optionally allows you to rent a remote instance to play through from within their client. I've used it with friends to act as a pseudo-split-screen option for playing games like Fallout or Elder Scrolls together, across the country, and it works marvelously on a wired connection, and amicably through a wireless one for singleplayer experiences.

      There are also other services, Shadow being the only other I can think of immediately, that have businesses around video game streaming and are rather successful.

      Honestly, if I didn't play video games so much, I would totally be opting for a service to run the game on external hardware and stream it to me. My father did this for a good while before he got new hardware and even the multiplayer experiences were really good.

      2 votes
  3. Ephemere
    Link
    Well, fingers crossed. As a portable system user, that sounds like an excellent addition to the console.

    Well, fingers crossed. As a portable system user, that sounds like an excellent addition to the console.