4 votes

How Command & Conquer: Tiberian Sun solved pathfinding

1 comment

  1. hungariantoast
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    Don't know how often you frequent /r/gamedev, but I stumbled across this post earlier today and the pathfinding is satisfying, to say the least. And yeah, minimizing the stupid decisions the AI...

    Don't know how often you frequent /r/gamedev, but I stumbled across this post earlier today and the pathfinding is satisfying, to say the least.

    And yeah, minimizing the stupid decisions the AI can make really helps with making it seem smarter, even if the work being done on the top end of its behavior is less fruitful.

    After watching Game Maker's Toolkit's video, What Makes Good AI?, it's impressive how it's really the small details and elimination of the cruft at the bottom of the behavioral scale that give the biggest impressions in an AI's behavior and to be honest, that video convinced me that good AI is a servant to the player's experience, not something that's meant to be as close to a manifestation of reality as possible. They don't need to even be smart in every case, they just need to be fun.

    Also, if you haven't watched Ars Technica's video on Total War: Rome II, How Total War: Rome II's Ambition Was Almost Its Undoing, you should, it's quite interesting, especially the bit where the artist talks about using Photoshop with terrain generation.

    That part of the video reminded me of this post on Reddit where a developer was doing something similar, but only after generating large data sets from incredibly basic images. Sadly, the game that user was working on doesn't seem to exist any longer.

    1 vote