12 votes

Fallout 76 just gave people a reason to play The Outer Worlds instead

8 comments

  1. [2]
    Akir
    Link
    I never expected to be sold into buying a video game by the Washington Post before. How on earth did this game go so far under my radar, though? I can't believe this game is coming out tomorrow...

    I never expected to be sold into buying a video game by the Washington Post before. How on earth did this game go so far under my radar, though? I can't believe this game is coming out tomorrow without me having heard any details about it. Maybe I should start listening to video game news again.

    5 votes
    1. balooga
      Link Parent
      I posted the launch trailer a few days ago. Really looking forward to playing it tomorrow!

      I posted the launch trailer a few days ago. Really looking forward to playing it tomorrow!

      5 votes
  2. Douglas
    Link
    The multiplayer aspect of one versus the other, along with the more fleshed out quest system (in The Outer Worlds) never really made me even consider comparing the two. I do want a polished...

    The multiplayer aspect of one versus the other, along with the more fleshed out quest system (in The Outer Worlds) never really made me even consider comparing the two.

    I do want a polished multiplayer experience akin to Fallout 76 or Rust or 7 Days to Die, etc.-- a game where it's open world like Skyrim and you may or may not run into another player, but with the polish that Blizzard or Naughty Dog have come to be known for. That would be fantastic. I would love for a silent multiplayer aspect where other players just drop in and out of your open-world game without any prior notice and you just have to figure it out for yourself.

    But I'm by no means expecting that from The Outer Worlds, which I look at as just another Skyrim/Fallout game (even though I know it's different developers) with (hopefully) much better writing and far greater quest options over just "Go to X and shoot Y." over and over.

    It just feels weird for people to keep butting their heads together. I can hate what Fallout's doing and want to play The Outer Worlds without putting a link between the two.

    5 votes
  3. babypuncher
    Link
    Washington Post publishes some surprisingly good video game articles. They seem more keen to talk about the broader social context around a game, which I think is important when assessing any work...

    Washington Post publishes some surprisingly good video game articles. They seem more keen to talk about the broader social context around a game, which I think is important when assessing any work of art. Too many reviewers think they need to review something as if it exists in a vacuum to give it a fair shake, which is just not how most people actually experience games.

    4 votes
  4. [4]
    Greg
    Link
    Huh - well I was never going to purchase Fallout 76 anyway, but the £50 I was about to spend on The Outer Worlds is now going to a Game Pass subscription instead. Helpful article!

    Huh - well I was never going to purchase Fallout 76 anyway, but the £50 I was about to spend on The Outer Worlds is now going to a Game Pass subscription instead. Helpful article!

    1 vote
    1. [3]
      reese
      Link Parent
      When I first heard the premise of Fallout 76, I instantly knew it was a game I would never buy. That admittedly reactionary determination was made without even considering any advertised features...

      When I first heard the premise of Fallout 76, I instantly knew it was a game I would never buy. That admittedly reactionary determination was made without even considering any advertised features or watching any promo videos.

      And why is that? Because Fallout is a single-player game, and I know in my bones that's why it works. I don't want to play single-player games with other people; that defeats the point. They'll use an exploit to speed us through a map rather than take time to explore it, yell at me for taking a pee break, and vote to skip the cutscenes. Even worse, Bethesda didn't really make multiplayer games prior to Fallout 76 (note that it's actually ZeniMax Online Studios that wrote the netcode for ESO—their job postings for backend engineers are legit). So I wasn't surprised when I heard about this shit.

      And right now I'm super-duper not surprised about Bethesda moving to a subscription model to milk their most loyal fans, based on years of watching Todd Howard brazenly resell Skyrim on every device, instead of maybe, like, rewriting or overhauling their decrepit game engine. As far as AAA game companies go, both Bethesda and Blizzard are on the naughty list as of recent for me. I don't consciously do boycotts in collaboration with others, but I don't know about giving these people money anymore (especially not Blizzard).

      If anyone deserves our money, it's Obsidian. They listen to players and make the games we actually want. They've cranked out fantastic games for years without turning evil. Microsoft acquired them, yeah, but lately I've come to respect Microsoft a hell of a lot more than I ever thought I would. They seem to give their employees and subsidiaries a great deal of autonomy, and for years now they've been nothing but a boon to the open source community. Anyway, sorry for the long-winded rant. The Outer Worlds looks great, and I hope its success compels Bethesda to consider that it may no longer have a monopoly on niche games we like to play. Before long there may be an alternative to TES.

      10 votes
      1. [2]
        Douglas
        Link Parent
        So I'm kinda with you on that, however I wouldn't mind a game where you're exploring ghost towns/maps and there's like a miiiiiiinniiiiiscule chance, like 1% that you run into another player...

        Because Fallout is a single-player game, and I know in my bones that's why it works. I don't want to play single-player games with other people; that defeats the point.

        So I'm kinda with you on that, however I wouldn't mind a game where you're exploring ghost towns/maps and there's like a miiiiiiinniiiiiscule chance, like 1% that you run into another player dropped into your map without any warning/notice whatsoever. I feel like if that were done right, and the core gameplay was difficult enough as is, it could really add some tension to the game.

        Maybe not do it with the Fallout universe, but a game where you're exploring a large, abandoned map maybe. Or something like Watchdogs 2, where another player kind of plays hide and seek with you and can potentially sick NPCs on you.

        4 votes
        1. ChuckS
          Link Parent
          This is pretty much an exact description of DayZ. That game was literally the most intense game I've ever played in my life. The map was a large island and it actually took 10 minutes or so of...

          This is pretty much an exact description of DayZ. That game was literally the most intense game I've ever played in my life. The map was a large island and it actually took 10 minutes or so of holding forward to get across the island. Zombies everywhere, and you need to eat. Towns have grocery stores and hospitals, so lots of supplies, but you might not be the only person trying to get restocked.

          Hackers ruined the game. It got so bad I quit and never went back, but it was a really, really special game until then.

          3 votes