19 votes

Teardown preview - A voxel ray-traced game on PC with next-generation destruction and physics

4 comments

  1. [2]
    nothis
    (edited )
    Link
    Voxels really have potential, they went out of fashion (if they ever were that popular in the first place) but there's cool things you can do with modern graphics cards and voxels. I might check...

    Voxels really have potential, they went out of fashion (if they ever were that popular in the first place) but there's cool things you can do with modern graphics cards and voxels. I might check this out just for the technology but it's gotta be said: This is essentially a tech demo.

    I've daydreamed for a while that a company like Valve could pick this up to make the next Half-Life or something (you can definitely do less "blocky" looking versions of this for games going for realism, like they showed in Claybook, for example). With that AAA polish and some cool ideas for voxel combat and AI, this could be amazing. It's hard, maybe impossible, but it's the kind of challenge that games seemed to handle back when generational leaps weren't just a factor of screen resolution. There's some fresh forms of interaction in this tech that would feel genuinely next-gen.

    3 votes
    1. grungegun
      (edited )
      Link Parent
      The biggest problem with voxels is that they tend to be 'locked' to the grid of the game world. Teardown allows you to escape that, but basically what it does is it checks to see if a group of...

      The biggest problem with voxels is that they tend to be 'locked' to the grid of the game world. Teardown allows you to escape that, but basically what it does is it checks to see if a group of voxels is separated from the game world, then treats that group separately.

      In my opinion, the real MVP here is implementing physics calculations on the GPU.

      Edit: it allows more interactions than just that, but those tend to be despite voxels, rather than enhanced by them.

      4 votes
  2. yellow
    Link
    I wonder if the game could handle more complicated physics properties for the voxels. Either as composites of different strengths (e.g. the mortar in brick walls is weaker so that it breaks before...

    I wonder if the game could handle more complicated physics properties for the voxels. Either as composites of different strengths (e.g. the mortar in brick walls is weaker so that it breaks before the bricks) or weird combinations that cause specific behaviors (e.g. tempered glass that shatters completely once chipped).

    1 vote
  3. tindall
    Link
    Sadly, this appears to be Windows-only, and effectively Nvidia-only, for the forseeable future.

    Sadly, this appears to be Windows-only, and effectively Nvidia-only, for the forseeable future.

    2 votes