4 votes

A Black History Month that explains why we need Black History Month

3 comments

  1. [3]
    SlipSlop Link
    I agree that it is idiotic to force them to remove his name from the resolution. I personally don't believe Kapernick deserves the fame he's received from these issues (excluding the kneeling...

    I agree that it is idiotic to force them to remove his name from the resolution. I personally don't believe Kapernick deserves the fame he's received from these issues (excluding the kneeling during the pledge) but I respect people have other opinions.

    I do feel that people are too focused on race today however. It makes sense in this context (implying racism by showing the difference in race) but others see to put it in too often. The goal of the modern equality movement I think should move from trying to make people equal in the law to making people equal in people's mind. I understand that people are different in different ways, including skin color, but it should be as important as hair color.

    2 votes
    1. dubteedub Link Parent
      Okay, sure it would be great to move on to equality in people's minds, but black people are other minorities are still far from treated equally under the law and in life. Report: black men get...

      The goal of the modern equality movement I think should move from trying to make people equal in the law to making people equal in people's mind.

      Okay, sure it would be great to move on to equality in people's minds, but black people are other minorities are still far from treated equally under the law and in life.

      An analysis found black men’s sentences are 19.1 percent longer than white men’s, even after controlling for criminal history and other factors.

      Unfortunately, wealth in this country is unequally distributed by race—and particularly between white and black1 households.2 African American families have a fraction of the wealth of white families, leaving them more economically insecure and with far fewer opportunities for economic mobility. As this report documents, even after considering positive factors such as increased education levels, African Americans have less wealth than whites. Less wealth translates into fewer opportunities for upward mobility and is compounded by lower income levels and fewer chances to build wealth or pass accumulated wealth down to future generations.

      Several key factors exacerbate this vicious cycle of wealth inequality. Black households, for example, have far less access to tax-advantaged forms of savings, due in part to a long history of employment discrimination and other discriminatory practices. A well-documented history of mortgage market discrimination means that blacks are significantly less likely to be homeowners than whites,3 which means they have less access to the savings and tax benefits that come with owning a home. Persistent labor market discrimination and segregation also force blacks into fewer and less advantageous employment opportunities than their white counterparts.4 Thus, African Americans have less access to stable jobs, good wages, and retirement benefits at work5— all key drivers by which American families gain access to savings. Moreover, under the current tax code, families with higher incomes receive increased tax incentives associated with both housing and retirement savings.6 Because African Americans tend to have lower incomes, they inevitably receive fewer tax benefits—even if they are homeowners or have retirement savings accounts. The bottom line is that persistent housing and labor market discrimination and segregation worsen the damaging cycle of wealth inequality.

      Not to mention the entire issue of policing discrimination.

      2 votes
    2. alyaza Link Parent
      it'd be nice if that worked, but it really does not the overwhelming majority of the time. i'm sure in some circumstances, that strategy works--but often, the best way to make people equal in the...

      The goal of the modern equality movement I think should move from trying to make people equal in the law to making people equal in people's mind.

      it'd be nice if that worked, but it really does not the overwhelming majority of the time. i'm sure in some circumstances, that strategy works--but often, the best way to make people equal in the eyes of the mind is by making people equal in the eyes of the law because then people are forced to confront their racial or social prejudices head on through interactions, which often dispels those ideas or at least minimizes them in the long run. this is, for example, basically what happened with interracial marriages and what is currently happening with gay marriages.

      I understand that people are different in different ways, including skin color, but it should be as important as hair color.

      this is also understandable but, in practice, probably something we can only minimize in the short term, because the reality is that things like skin color and social constructs like race do matter on some level, as much as we'd like to admit that's not the case. in my mind it's very much a chicken and egg situation, though, because to stop caring and lending importance to things like race and skin color, we'd probably need to drop all pretenses of it mattering in situations; but to do that would also deny the fact that those things do matter in certain situations like how the police treat you or what kind of health care service you can expect. and really, how the fuck do you deal with that?

      2 votes