13 votes

I'm the only Australian living in North Korea. Let me tell you about it

3 comments

  1. [3]
    sp4z Link
    I thought the comments section in this article was actually quite interesting with the people there arguing about the degree to which this piece is the author’s own words and how much of it has...

    I thought the comments section in this article was actually quite interesting with the people there arguing about the degree to which this piece is the author’s own words and how much of it has been overseen or edited by the North Korean government.
    Furthermore, with regards to the writing that does wholly belong to the author, to what degree he has been 'brainwashed' or otherwise influenced during his time there (not that us ‘Westerners’, to use the term loosely, have not also been somewhat brainwashed in our views towards DPRK).
    And finally, the degree to which he has had his experience crafted for him as a foreign student studying in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (e.g. the limitations he mentions with interacting with locals and the particular roommate he was living with, as well as the fact that he was based in the capital Pyongyang - the only city any foreigners seem to be able to access).
    I suppose all of the above pertains to anything that's related to North Korea or any other country with a tightly controlling governing power however, so they're not exactly unexpected or novel thoughts.
    Still interesting nonetheless.

    5 votes
    1. [2]
      knocklessmonster Link Parent
      It sounds a lot like Laibach's take when they went to North Korea. I'?m sure they both had a limited view of the nation on both parts as nobody wants to go to jail in a communist dictatoriship by...

      It sounds a lot like Laibach's take when they went to North Korea. I'?m sure they both had a limited view of the nation on both parts as nobody wants to go to jail in a communist dictatoriship by directly undermining the government, but the liberalization of it's economy, and introduction of outside stuff like smartphones and fast food were something I'd never seen.

      5 votes
      1. alyaza Link Parent
        little aside but north korea makes no claim to being Marxist-Leninist or even socialist nowadays and hasn't for about two decades. it'd be more accurate to describe them as a hereditary monarchy...

        I'?m sure they both had a limited view of the nation on both parts as nobody wants to go to jail in a communist dictatoriship by directly undermining the government, but the liberalization of it's economy, and introduction of outside stuff like smartphones and fast food were something I'd never seen.

        little aside but north korea makes no claim to being Marxist-Leninist or even socialist nowadays and hasn't for about two decades. it'd be more accurate to describe them as a hereditary monarchy with only nominally socialist characteristics, and their economic liberalization makes more sense with that in mind.

        7 votes