14 votes

A sex doll maker says most of her customers are buying them for ‘comfort’ rather than sex

6 comments

  1. [5]
    Omnicrola
    Link
    While I understand that everyone's grieving process is different, this does not seem like a healthy coping mechanism for dealing with loss. Though as the proprietor mentions, this may be more of a...

    While I understand that everyone's grieving process is different, this does not seem like a healthy coping mechanism for dealing with loss. Though as the proprietor mentions, this may be more of a symptom of how society had isolated people from one another. If your SO is pretty much all of your social interaction, if they pass away you're left with nobody to turn to for support.

    15 votes
    1. [2]
      rogue_cricket
      Link Parent
      I feel like that's becoming increasingly true. I'd honestly like to get to know more of my neighbours locally, for instance, but it feels like that's a thing that's becoming more and more "weird"...

      Though as the proprietor mentions, this may be more of a symptom of how society had isolated people from one another.

      I feel like that's becoming increasingly true. I'd honestly like to get to know more of my neighbours locally, for instance, but it feels like that's a thing that's becoming more and more "weird" to do. There's probably a lot of factors involved in this shifting social norm and I won't even start to speculate - I just know that as I get older, I find I'm craving a sense of community more.

      (Maybe I'll get my neighbour another little thank-you card and gift, for when he clears the end of my driveway with his snowblower...)

      If your SO is pretty much all of your social interaction, if they pass away you're left with nobody to turn to for support.

      Yeah... I have a vague memory of reading about how it's not uncommon for older married men especially to not really have any strong connections outside of what their wife has worked to create for them. It's their wife who organizes the parties, sends the cards, buys the gifts, remembers the birthdays, plans the outings, etc., and so if she leaves him or passes away, that leaves him in a really precarious state - dealing with a loss and prone to isolation. It's rough.

      11 votes
      1. Omnicrola
        Link Parent
        I think it's pretty common in men in general. There's a related aspect of men often relying on their female partners for near 100% of their emotional support, which is exhausting for the partner....

        I think it's pretty common in men in general. There's a related aspect of men often relying on their female partners for near 100% of their emotional support, which is exhausting for the partner.

        Some years ago I realized that I needed to be deliberate about forming friendships outside of work. So I've deliberately maintained a regular gaming group, and often committed myself to activities I wasn't really sure I'd enjoy, just to make sure I get out of my house more and have people other than my wife to talk to. It's not easy, I very much enjoy playing video games all day and always will. But even when playing with people online, it's not the same as face to face over a beer.

        8 votes
    2. NaraVara
      Link Parent
      If my SO passed away, I can only imagine that having a lifeless mannequin staring at me while I make dinner for one would be more likely to make me dissolve into a puddle of tears. Good thing I...

      If your SO is pretty much all of your social interaction, if they pass away you're left with nobody to turn to for support.

      If my SO passed away, I can only imagine that having a lifeless mannequin staring at me while I make dinner for one would be more likely to make me dissolve into a puddle of tears.

      Good thing I have a dog. . .

      9 votes
    3. mrbig
      (edited )
      Link Parent
      Hard to generalize in that area. People grieve in different ways. I remember how my mother was once deeply concerned with the fact that my uncle — while visible shattered — did not cry once after...

      Hard to generalize in that area. People grieve in different ways.

      I remember how my mother was once deeply concerned with the fact that my uncle — while visible shattered — did not cry once after his son died. He was suffering deeply but acted it out in his own manner. As a quiet introvert, I was able to understand that. My mother, a very outwardly and emotional person, couldn't.

      Another point of comparison: while generally harmful to social interactions, World of Warcraft was once instrumental in reintroducing me to society.

      So yeah, I think a doll, weird as it is, could be of benefit to some people in that situation.

      5 votes
  2. cfabbro
    (edited )
    Link
    Lars and the Real Girl is an incredibly funny, heartfelt and touching movie on exactly this subject, that was surprisingly tastefully done given the subject matter. Ryan Gosling and Emily Mortimer...

    Lars and the Real Girl is an incredibly funny, heartfelt and touching movie on exactly this subject, that was surprisingly tastefully done given the subject matter. Ryan Gosling and Emily Mortimer are absolutely fantastic in it, and the movie had me weeping like a baby (in a good way) at several points. I highly recommend people check out, it's great!

    11 votes