6 votes

In 2008, everyone thought the recession was bad. But in 2020, many Americans’ views depend on their party

4 comments

  1. [3]
    moonbathers
    Link
    I've had this album bookmarked for a while that shows how quickly Republicans' opinions change on a dime about things depending on who's in office.

    I've had this album bookmarked for a while that shows how quickly Republicans' opinions change on a dime about things depending on who's in office.

    11 votes
    1. [2]
      MonkeyPants
      Link Parent
      So depressing, every time I see it.

      So depressing, every time I see it.

      3 votes
      1. moonbathers
        Link Parent
        The ones that get me the most are the Russia/Putin approval polls, like as soon as the news about election interference came out a bunch of Republicans decided they were ok with it because it was...

        The ones that get me the most are the Russia/Putin approval polls, like as soon as the news about election interference came out a bunch of Republicans decided they were ok with it because it was against Democrats. There are a couple cases of Democrats having whiplash in those polls too, but they're not about compromising our country's integrity.

        3 votes
  2. Kuromantis
    (edited )
    Link
    Most relevant image Just a day in the dystopia.

    Most relevant image

    The U.S. economy is objectively awful right now. The unemployment rate is at levels not seen since the Great Depression and this quarter’s decline in gross domestic product is expected to be the worst on record. Most economists believe it will take years to recover from this recession.

    Not everyone thinks the economy is doing so poorly, though.

    In the most recent Quinnipiac University national survey, 69 percent of Republicans described the U.S. economy as “excellent” or “good.” Similarly, nearly two-thirds of Republicans in both Civiqs’s daily tracking polls and in a June 11-15 Associated Press/NORC Poll said that the nation’s current economy is at least leaning toward good. By contrast, only around 10 percent of Democrats thought that the national economy was doing well in those surveys.

    In fact, a closer look at Civiqs’ data1 shows that Democrats’ and Republicans’ views of the economy are more polarized now than they’ve been at any point during President Trump’s time in office.

    Even when Republicans’ outlook on the economy was at its lowest point this year, according to Civiqs data, they still felt more upbeat about the state of the economy than at any point in 2016 before Trump was elected, when the economy was objectively better.

    Of course, the difficulty is that these attitudes aren’t just partisanship either. After eight years of Obama’s presidency, racial and economic anxiety became increasingly intertwined to the point that racial resentment was a much stronger predictor of economic pessimism under Obama than it had been under George W. Bush. That is, white people — especially white Trump voters — believed that Black people were getting ahead while they were left behind.

    Take the 2016 American National Election Studies survey. Before Trump took office, the more racial discrimination white people thought their own group faced, the more likely they were to say that the economy was worse than it had been a year earlier. These voters largely voted for Trump. But under Trump’s presidency, a similar poll found that white voters were less likely to say the economy had gotten worse if they believed white people faced high levels of racial discrimination.

    Just a day in the dystopia.

    5 votes