8 votes

Is there such a thing as a "Hispanic" and "Latino" person?

13 comments

  1. [6]
    hamstergeddon
    Link
    This speaks to me. My paternal great-grandparents were Mexican and Colombian. As such my grandfather grew up exposed to those cultures and spoke both Spanish and English. My father, however, had...

    This speaks to me. My paternal great-grandparents were Mexican and Colombian. As such my grandfather grew up exposed to those cultures and spoke both Spanish and English. My father, however, had very limited exposure to his Hispanic heritage and only speaks English. I had zero exposure to my Hispanic heritage and only speak English. I'm also very light skinned, so I don't particularly look Hispanic, but I've still got a clearly Hispanic last name.

    So what does that even make me? I don't really know. I've always just checked off "white" when the question shows up on forms, because I don't really feel any attachment to my own heritage.

    5 votes
    1. imperialismus
      Link Parent
      I wonder how useful these survey questions are. I hail from a traditionally relatively homogenous country (Norway) and I have never encountered a form which asked me to specify an ethnic or racial...

      I wonder how useful these survey questions are. I hail from a traditionally relatively homogenous country (Norway) and I have never encountered a form which asked me to specify an ethnic or racial identification. Statistics still exist on immigrants and their descendents, but they are generally based on factors such as ‘were you or your parents born in the country or not’, not self-identification.

      I understand that especially in a more ethnically diverse country like the US, there is a desire to track ethnic or racial origin. Charitably, we might interpret it as a way to identify areas in which minority groups struggle unfairly, so that measures can be taken to improve those things. But with such simplified and flawed categorizations, how useful is that data, really?

      It’s a bit trippy to hear about the American obsession with race, since it is so foreign to my own experience, but having never experienced it first-hand I can’t really pronounce a judgment on it.

      7 votes
    2. Loire
      Link Parent
      Latin America is a fairly obvious example of how the (semi-)modern view of "race" is simply a construct. You have Latino's as "white" as any European born alongside those as "black" as any African...

      Latin America is a fairly obvious example of how the (semi-)modern view of "race" is simply a construct. You have Latino's as "white" as any European born alongside those as "black" as any African with another population that would pass for any Native American in North America, and any gradient of mixture in between. And while racism still exists between those groups, their lives are significantly more culturally homogenous than the equivalent groups in North America.

      What you are is what you are and the presentation of your skin colour only plays a part of that so far as your society/culture allows it.

      I look identical to a white American but I am nothing like them in political nor cultural beliefs. The same goes for me and a white German, or a white Russian. I am a Canadian, more specifically a result of my province's cultural heritage. For you, assuming you are American, you are closer to whatever cultural stew you grew up in than you are to some overarching umbrella based on genetics.

      6 votes
    3. [3]
      NaraVara
      Link Parent
      Don't forms now have Hispanic/Not-Hispanic as a separate "ethnicity" category?

      Don't forms now have Hispanic/Not-Hispanic as a separate "ethnicity" category?

      1 vote
      1. hamstergeddon
        Link Parent
        Honestly it just makes things more confusing for me. Easier to just check "white" and call it a day.

        Honestly it just makes things more confusing for me. Easier to just check "white" and call it a day.

        2 votes
      2. krg
        Link Parent
        Racially, considered white. But you can specify ethnicity as "hispanic." In my experience, at least.

        Racially, considered white. But you can specify ethnicity as "hispanic." In my experience, at least.

  2. TheWanderer
    Link
    The latino / Hispanic like the African / American are ridiculous categories that only works inside USA. I have an english friend that happens to be black he is not american and his heritage in...

    The latino / Hispanic like the African / American are ridiculous categories that only works inside USA. I have an english friend that happens to be black he is not american and his heritage in England is longer than most of the people who lives there, so why I would call him African or American?.
    Something different happen with me, I am from Argentina, my family all come from Italy. So, I am a latino? Well I come from latin america, Hispanic? I don't have anything to do with Spain, European? I haven't born there.

    What I meant is that those races are just made up categories that has little to do with a real race and just create more problems than anything else. I would suggest to just stick with nationalities and forget about race because our past is so mixed that doesn't makes sense anymore.

    4 votes
  3. mrbig
    Link
    As a Brazilian, I feel very much NOT Hispanic. We’re Iberic. Our language is different and also the culture. I don’t really care about any classification.

    As a Brazilian, I feel very much NOT Hispanic. We’re Iberic. Our language is different and also the culture. I don’t really care about any classification.

    2 votes
  4. ggarron
    Link
    I am Bolivian, so yes I come from hispanic roots, and of course I am Latino as my language comes from Latin.

    I am Bolivian, so yes I come from hispanic roots, and of course I am Latino as my language comes from Latin.

    1 vote
  5. [2]
    Kuromantis
    (edited )
    Link
    Tl;dr: No, because Latin America is a far cry from being ethnically homogenous.

    Tl;dr: No, because Latin America is a far cry from being ethnically homogenous.

    1. NaraVara
      Link Parent
      You can lump or split groups of people however you want though to get more granular or more generic. "Ethnicities" and "races" aren't really primordial or immutable categories. They're mostly just...

      You can lump or split groups of people however you want though to get more granular or more generic. "Ethnicities" and "races" aren't really primordial or immutable categories. They're mostly just descriptions of what markers for identification people find most salient within a specific context.

      9 votes
  6. [2]
    box0rox
    Link
    It means you speak Spanish natively, and are either in an English speaking country or being referred to by someone who is. People who actually live in Latin America think of themselves as members...

    It means you speak Spanish natively, and are either in an English speaking country or being referred to by someone who is. People who actually live in Latin America think of themselves as members of their country or culture; I don't think there is a big Pan Latin movement.

    1. mrbig
      Link Parent
      And It’s kinda absurd that the LARGEST and more populated country in South America that does not speak Spanish is basically ignored for anything of consequence...

      And It’s kinda absurd that the LARGEST and more populated country in South America that does not speak Spanish is basically ignored for anything of consequence...

      1 vote