9 votes

How police are using 'super recognizers' to track criminals

2 comments

  1. Silbern
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    I was expecting a dystopian AI recognition or computer virus tracking system, but this was actually much cooler and more interesting. I find the 1% figure really interesting - that's about the...

    I was expecting a dystopian AI recognition or computer virus tracking system, but this was actually much cooler and more interesting. I find the 1% figure really interesting - that's about the same proportion of the population with ASD such as myself, yet I've never met anyone with this ability in my life, at least knowingly. It's kinda crazy to think of how many people there are out there with this ability who don't realize it and how much better they are at facial recognition.

    And fwiw, I can confirm that I indeed suck at recognizing faces, it usually takes 5-10 long exposures to someone before I can consistently place their face. On the flipside though, I'm excellent with names, and can recall the name of every friend, teacher, university professor, and coworker I've ever had with minimal difficulties.

    5 votes
  2. Thra11
    (edited )
    Link
    I see two interesting aspects to this: Presumably you can use this to circumvent bans on 'computer' facial recognition. On the one hand, the cost of employing a skilled human should prevent...

    I see two interesting aspects to this:

    1. Presumably you can use this to circumvent bans on 'computer' facial recognition. On the one hand, the cost of employing a skilled human should prevent excessive, indiscriminate use. On the other hand, depending what you do when somebody is recognised, it could still be problematic. For example, supposing the "recognizer" wasn't as good at telling people of certain origins apart: people could find themselves being stopped and questioned disproportionately often based on their race.
    2. It sounds like these "recognizers" are mostly just picking out suspects at this stage, helping to direct law enforcement in acquiring evidence, rather than providing evidence themselves. However, could they be called on to testify to the presence and identity of the suspect. I'm reminded of the many cases where the FBI relied on "expert" hair analysis, resulting in wrongful convictions.
    4 votes