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As Nevada clears way for ex-felons to vote, most other states still require restitution and fee payments for eligibility

1 comment

  1. reese (edited ) Link
    I happen to be one of the majority who voted for Amendment 4 in Florida, which restores voting rights to ex-felons. The reason ballot measures like that are so successful here is that, actually,...

    Under a new Florida law, Raysor will have to pay $4,260 in order to have her right to vote restored. If she pays $30 a month as stipulated by her court-ordered payment plan, Raysor will not be able to vote in the state of Florida until 2031.

    I happen to be one of the majority who voted for Amendment 4 in Florida, which restores voting rights to ex-felons. The reason ballot measures like that are so successful here is that, actually, people are reasonable on both sides of aisle. When they're in the voting booth and presented with a plain list of things we could accomplish, their conscience enters the decision-making process. Obviously some language on the ballot can be downright goddamn confusing, but I know that, last time, it was relatively straightforward. I'm pretty sure most people don't know much about the ballot measures prior to entering the booth, meaning there's little chance anyone tells them how to vote beforehand.

    As mentioned in the article, NPR recently reported on how Ron DeSantis signed legislation restricting the amendment to Florida's constitution after a majority voted in favor of it. The Intercept adds that:

    Not only do the fines now implicate voting rights, they can lead to drivers’ license suspensions and additional time behind bars.

    2 votes