24 votes

Norwegian police have arrested a high-profile American white supremacist as he was scheduled to address a far-right conference in Oslo

9 comments

  1. [6]
    DanBC
    Link
    He seems to be making a freedom of expression defence. That would be article 10. https://www.echr.coe.int/Documents/Convention_ENG.pdf In Europe that's not an absolute right.

    He seems to be making a freedom of expression defence. That would be article 10. https://www.echr.coe.int/Documents/Convention_ENG.pdf

    In Europe that's not an absolute right.

    Freedom of expression

    1. Everyone has the right to freedom of expression. This right shall include freedom to hold opinions and to receive and impart information and ideas without interference by public authority and regardless of frontiers. This Article shall not prevent States from requiring the licensing of broadcasting, television or cinema enterprises.

    2. The exercise of these freedoms, since it carries with it duties and responsibilities, may be subject to such formalities, conditions, restrictions or penalties as are prescribed by law and are necessary in a democratic society, in the interests of national security, territorial integrity or public safety, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, for the protection of the reputation or rights of others, for preventing the disclosure of information received in confidence, or for maintaining the authority and impartiality of the judiciary

    11 votes
    1. [5]
      Grzmot
      Link Parent
      Gods I wish Americans would stop exporting their beliefs to Europe, especially when it's shit like this or Steve Bannon funding "think-tanks" in Europe to spread his hateful ideas.

      Gods I wish Americans would stop exporting their beliefs to Europe, especially when it's shit like this or Steve Bannon funding "think-tanks" in Europe to spread his hateful ideas.

      13 votes
      1. [4]
        Silbern
        (edited )
        Link Parent
        I don't think it's really fair to generalize this neo-nazi or Steve Bannon as "Americans". Nor do I really see how this is exporting beliefs - Steve Bannon's actions are those of a private...

        I don't think it's really fair to generalize this neo-nazi or Steve Bannon as "Americans". Nor do I really see how this is exporting beliefs - Steve Bannon's actions are those of a private individual, he's not even tangily part of the US Federal Government anymore.

        9 votes
        1. [3]
          Grzmot
          Link Parent
          You can be a private individual and still export your beliefs, not to speak of the numerous religious organizations trying to evangelize the rest of the world. Religious zealots are rarer in...

          You can be a private individual and still export your beliefs, not to speak of the numerous religious organizations trying to evangelize the rest of the world. Religious zealots are rarer in Europe and more importantly, they don't run around trying to convince everyone else of their shitty beliefs. Remember when American evangelicals went to Ireland to try and stop the abortion referendum from succeeding?

          Actions of indivuduals do not need to be endorsed by the US government to make it a uniquely American issue. Citizens from other countries don't go to America and advocate for universal healthcare.

          5 votes
          1. [2]
            Silbern
            Link Parent
            Idk, I guess I don't like making generalizations from the actions of a few individuals because it leads to unsubstantiated and vastly overbroad generalizations. An example of this in the US is...

            Idk, I guess I don't like making generalizations from the actions of a few individuals because it leads to unsubstantiated and vastly overbroad generalizations. An example of this in the US is "illegal Mexican immigrants are rapists". While you can find instances of illegal immigrants having committed the crime of rape if you want, the vast majority of them don't. I wasn't personally aware of American activists in Ireland, but googling led me to a single article about one group, "Let Them Live". I'm not aware of the scale of American missionary movements in Ireland, but since I can't find anything on this being a mass movement, nor have I ever heard of a phenomenon from other Americans, I don't think it's really fair to make a mass generalization of Americans from the actions of a single group. I don't approve of such behavior and I think most Americans wouldn't either, probably even many that oppose abortion here.

            Far more Irish citizens participated in acts generally considered terrorism by the international community, let us not forget, yet I don't think it would be socially acceptable (or should be socially acceptable) to say that Irish people are violent.

            5 votes
            1. Grzmot
              Link Parent
              Regarding Ireland: This article lists at least two groups, the Family Research Council and Alliance Defending Freedom. What I meant is that not all Americans engange in spreading their beliefs...

              Regarding Ireland: This article lists at least two groups, the Family Research Council and Alliance Defending Freedom.

              What I meant is that not all Americans engange in spreading their beliefs around the world, but in general, whenever groups work in different countries to do this, they are American. Perhaps it gets reported around here more, cause reinforcing stereotypes sells. Ultimately I don't want to generalize the citizens of an entire nation.

              4 votes
  2. [3]
    Homicide
    Link
    I wonder what's the deal with white nationalism and Norway. The country itself isn't really racist but somehow it manages to attract all these lowlife white nationalists.

    I wonder what's the deal with white nationalism and Norway.

    The country itself isn't really racist but somehow it manages to attract all these lowlife white nationalists.

    2 votes
    1. Loire
      Link Parent
      The country is something like 83.5% Norwegian Caucasian and 8% other European Caucasian. It's a white nationalists wet dream.

      The country is something like 83.5% Norwegian Caucasian and 8% other European Caucasian. It's a white nationalists wet dream.

      13 votes
    2. Silbern
      (edited )
      Link Parent
      It certainly can be. I used to live in Norway, albeit 20 years ago, as my parents were sent there as foreign workers by an American oil company. There was a lot of racial discrimination and...

      It certainly can be. I used to live in Norway, albeit 20 years ago, as my parents were sent there as foreign workers by an American oil company. There was a lot of racial discrimination and harassment directed towards their coworkers and even my patents weren't treated particularly well - one very memorable incident for my mother included being berated and called a "stupid cow" by a manager because she couldn't pronounce the woman's name without a strong accent. I imagine it's become less so - and of course it's my anecdotal experiences- but Norwegians are still among the most conservative in Europe when it comes to immigration and tend be pretty nationalistic. Conservative on immigration + very financially successful = far right's wet dream, because they seen it as a validation that what they think is right.

      Of course, ignoring the nunerous tradegies in history that were caused by nationalism and ignoring that Norway's success stems from both gaining access to very valuable natural resources and smartly managing the results from them. Certainly not by privatizing it and letting their society become extremely economically stratified like has happended in many other oil states.

      8 votes