11 votes

Why the Popeyes Chicken Sandwich Craze Quickly Morphed into Black Shaming

Tags: usa, racism

11 comments

  1. [8]
    Loire
    Link
    Is it "black shaming," if every quoted instance of criticism came from African Americans? What and odd article. The title clearly lends itself to the conclusion that white people are making racist...

    Is it "black shaming," if every quoted instance of criticism came from African Americans? What and odd article. The title clearly lends itself to the conclusion that white people are making racist comments about the Popeye's fad, and yet not a single instance is portrayed. Is it wrong for black people to criticize black people?

    6 votes
    1. [2]
      hungariantoast
      Link Parent
      Yes. Black people are capable of perpetuating black shaming. The article includes a few examples of how and why this is. What? How did you arrive at that conclusion? The title says literally...

      Is it "black shaming," if every quoted instance of criticism came from African Americans?

      Yes. Black people are capable of perpetuating black shaming. The article includes a few examples of how and why this is.

      The title clearly lends itself to the conclusion that white people are making racist comments about the Popeye's fad

      What? How did you arrive at that conclusion? The title says literally nothing about white people. Only if you assume white people are the sole instigators of black shaming would you perhaps come to that conclusion.

      Is it wrong for black people to criticize black people?

      In some cases, absolutely. The article even gives an example of the negative effect of one instance of black shaming perpetuated by black people:

      However serious or silly, the comments reinforce negative myths about black laziness and citizenship.

      15 votes
      1. TheJorro
        Link Parent
        Honestly, I assumed the same thing. It's not because of the title in isolation, it's just what I expect out of any reporting about race in the US these days, I guess. I fully expected this to be...

        What? How did you arrive at that conclusion? The title says literally nothing about white people. Only if you assume white people are the sole instigators of black shaming would you perhaps come to that conclusion.

        Honestly, I assumed the same thing. It's not because of the title in isolation, it's just what I expect out of any reporting about race in the US these days, I guess. I fully expected this to be an article about FOX News types jumping on a dog whistle campaign about black people, using the Popeye's sandwich as a catalyst, similar to how they did it over Kendrick Lamar's Alright performance at the BET awards.

        8 votes
    2. [5]
      no_exit
      Link Parent
      The article is about food insecurity and how it feeds into racial stereotypes, and that mocking Black people for eating fast food chicken entirely misses that context. It's not an odd article at...

      The article is about food insecurity and how it feeds into racial stereotypes, and that mocking Black people for eating fast food chicken entirely misses that context. It's not an odd article at all.

      Is it "black shaming," if every quoted instance of criticism came from African Americans?

      Yes? Again, it's about engaging with stereotypes in an unproductive way.

      Is it wrong for black people to criticize black people?

      Obviously not, since the writer is doing that themselves in the article. He's questioning why Black people are being criticized so intensely and why those criticisms are attempting to draw wildly off-base parallels with other issues, like voting.

      6 votes
      1. [4]
        Loire
        Link Parent
        Food insecurity in well populated urban areas is a product of those area's security and demographic issues. This isn't the food deserts of middle-of-nowhere Wyoming. The local grocery stores don't...

        The article is about food insecurity and how it feeds into racial stereotypes, and that mocking Black people for eating fast food chicken entirely misses that context. It's not an odd article at all.

        Food insecurity in well populated urban areas is a product of those area's security and demographic issues. This isn't the food deserts of middle-of-nowhere Wyoming. The local grocery stores don't succeed in these areas, either because that demographic isn't deviating from their eating habits (perhaps for financial reasons, also likely due to preference), or because they don't believe they can operate securely in the area. For either reason the shaming is accurate, although I agree, a terrible way to effect change.

        When we are discussing urban food deserts (or swamps as the article calls them) the equation is completely different from those elsewhere in the United States. These areas are often heavily populated, and would be huge target markets in any other circumstance, especially due to the lack of competition. It is a product of that populations activities, and thus the criticism is valid, especially when coming from those who ptesumedly grew up in similiar circumstances and thus have a better understanding of the mindset than you or I.

        4 votes
        1. [3]
          no_exit
          Link Parent
          Yeah, no, this is plain racism. The article even talks about it.

          The local grocery stores don't succeed in these areas, either because that demographic isn't deviating from their eating habits (perhaps for financial reasons, also likely due to preference), or because they don't believe they can operate securely in the area.

          It is a product of that populations activities

          Yeah, no, this is plain racism. The article even talks about it.

          Yet while corporations have invested heavily in pumping segregated areas with pork, chicken, potato starch, and grease, these restaurants rarely incorporate many of the healthier items popular in African-American cuisine. The renowned black chef Edna Lewis regularly centered greens in her recipes and noted that historically, “greens were one of the most important vegetables in the South” and “considered to have great nutritional value.” In Supersizing Urban America, Chin Jou recounted how 20th century “dietary surveys of African Americans in the South found that staple foods included highly nutritious foods such as fresh sweet potatoes, turnips, and greens.” Many of these items remain popular dishes in black homes today. Yet despite the communal popularity of staples like collard greens and black-eyed peas and racial justice activists’ demands for healthy retail options, the plant-based recipes central to African-American cooking rarely function as a focal for the food companies that dominate black neighborhoods.

          4 votes
          1. [2]
            Loire
            Link Parent
            Thats... Not at all what I was talking about. Food deserts are created by a lack of food sources, namely grocery stores where healthy products are sold. Grocery stores offer healthy alternatives...

            Thats... Not at all what I was talking about.

            Food deserts are created by a lack of food sources, namely grocery stores where healthy products are sold. Grocery stores offer healthy alternatives to fast food for dinner. The lack of these establishments in african american dominated communities is an issue not explained by "racism".

            I'm not even sure what you are trying to say with that quote. The vast majority of fast food restaurants don't incorporate sweet potatoes or green beans anywhere, why would that be different in black dominated communities?

            I'm not discussing restaurants because fast food restaraunts, with few exceptions, are inherently unhealthy. I am discussing the lack of grocery stores

            8 votes
            1. no_exit
              Link Parent
              It's pretty clearly talking about both, and while I would agree urban food deserts are not entirely explainable by simple racism, I think it would be pretty off the mark to say it doesn't...

              I'm not discussing restaurants because fast food restaraunts, with few exceptions, are inherently unhealthy. I am discussing the lack of grocery stores

              It's pretty clearly talking about both, and while I would agree urban food deserts are not entirely explainable by simple racism, I think it would be pretty off the mark to say it doesn't contribute at all in a structural sense. My problem with your post is that you're saying food deserts are a result of poverty and personal preference, when the argument is that it's really the other way around, that personal preference and poverty are driven by lack of access to basic needs, and the whole shaming aspect is focused on outcomes instead of causes.

              1 vote
  2. patience_limited
    Link
    I need to break the habit of glancing at comments; the response to the syndicated story on Yahoo is full of, well, racist yahoos.

    I need to break the habit of glancing at comments; the response to the syndicated story on Yahoo is full of, well, racist yahoos.

    3 votes