10 votes

No longer in shadows, Pentagon’s UFO unit will make some findings public

Tags: usa, pentagon, ufo

9 comments

  1. [7]
    CALICO
    Link
    I've been thinking about how to word this since this topic was posted. So, here it goes: You know that that annoying phrase in television and film, and occasionally in real life, that government...

    I've been thinking about how to word this since this topic was posted. So, here it goes:

    You know that that annoying phrase in television and film, and occasionally in real life, that government agents always give, I can neither confirm nor deny that ———? This is because an answer one way or the other compromises classified information. Confirming something tells you that the government has information in the affirmative, denying something tells you that the government has information to the contrary. Even in cases where the information itself is innocuous, sometimes the manner in which the information became known is classified. So, knowing something classified—for sure, one way or the other—means it cannot be spoken about openly.
    If I was aware that the US Gov had information on the existence of extraterrestrial presence—past or present—on this Earth, then I would have to be annoying and type that canned phrase vis-à-vis the aforementioned, and would not be at the liberty to say anything else on this matter.

    This preamble is necessary, because I am at that liberty.

    I am not aware of any information supporting the existence of extraterrestrial presence—past or present—on this Earth. And if this information was known, I would know it. I am not in the UAP Task Force, so there is a chance completely mindblowing will come to light. But based on what I do know, I'd say don't hold your breath. Mr. Rubio's comment is likely accurate, “Maybe there is a completely, sort of, boring explanation for it.”

    Sorry.

    11 votes
    1. [5]
      wakamex
      Link Parent
      why?

      if this information was known, I would know it

      why?

      3 votes
      1. [2]
        CALICO
        Link Parent
        A valid question, tricky to answer. The US government pays me to know things for them. Outside of my professional career, I am a huge sci-fi dork & I want nothing more than people like Bob Lazar...

        A valid question, tricky to answer.

        The US government pays me to know things for them.

        Outside of my professional career, I am a huge sci-fi dork & I want nothing more than people like Bob Lazar to be telling the truth. How exciting would that be?

        Information sharing is a pretty big thing in my field, and with few exceptions I've got access to everything—and so does everyone else in the field. Special Access Programs and Black Projects are a thing, and they're generally those exceptions.
        I read a lot of what gets put out across the community, just to keep tabs on everything—like how a lot of folks check various news sites every day. I also actively look for topics that interest me, and interact with topic-groups who compile reporting and discuss their topics.

        After years of recreational interaction with these groups, and looking through historics, I've yet to see one thing come out of the US government affirming the existence of or evidence for the existence of aliens, and the dreamer inside of me has to take a reality check and conclude that people like Bob Lazar are full of shit.

        Now, that isn't too say the Task Force doesn't have evidence. But if they do, it's locked down to the point where nobody in the government has it except for them.
        Given the timeline of how long the government has allegedly been hiding aliens, and when the Task Force was established, I find this unlikely.

        Hope you like my waffley, kind-of answer. I'm not going to Snowden myself.

        6 votes
        1. Amarok
          Link Parent
          If something revelatory did turn up, I'd be as interested in how that secret was kept as the secret itself.

          If something revelatory did turn up, I'd be as interested in how that secret was kept as the secret itself.

          3 votes
      2. [2]
        Turtle
        Link Parent
        I believe they have mentioned being in the military?

        I believe they have mentioned being in the military?

        2 votes
        1. CALICO
          Link Parent
          Former, current civilian employee.

          Former, current civilian employee.

          4 votes
    2. joplin
      Link Parent
      The story of how the phrase "I can neither confirm nor deny that," came about is an interesting one. It's known as the GLOMAR response. There's a whole RadioLab episode on it if you're interested.

      The story of how the phrase "I can neither confirm nor deny that," came about is an interesting one. It's known as the GLOMAR response. There's a whole RadioLab episode on it if you're interested.

      2 votes
  2. [2]
    Turtle
    (edited )
    Link

    Eric W. Davis, an astrophysicist who worked as a subcontractor and then a consultant for the Pentagon U.F.O. program since 2007, said that, in some cases, examination of the materials had so far failed to determine their source and led him to conclude, “We couldn’t make it ourselves.”

    The constraints on discussing classified programs — and the ambiguity of information cited in unclassified slides from the briefings — have put officials who have studied U.F.O.s in the position of stating their views without presenting any hard evidence.

    Mr. Davis, who now works for Aerospace Corporation, a defense contractor, said he gave a classified briefing to a Defense Department agency as recently as March about retrievals from “off-world vehicles not made on this earth.”

    3 votes
    1. suspended
      Link Parent
      I would be careful about making a leap from this to 'space aliens'.

      I would be careful about making a leap from this to 'space aliens'.

      2 votes