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Alexei Navalny reaches fourteenth day of hunger strike as officials threaten force-feeding

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  1. petrichor
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    Background on recent events (editorialized from Wikipedia) Alexei Navalny is a Russian opposition leader, lawyer, and anti-corruption activist. He came to international prominence by organizing...
    Background on recent events (editorialized from Wikipedia)

    Alexei Navalny is a Russian opposition leader, lawyer, and anti-corruption activist. He came to international prominence by organizing anti-government demonstrations and running for office to advocate reforms against corruption in Russia, and against President Vladimir Putin and his government. He is the leader of the Russia of the Future party and the founder of the Anti-Corruption Foundation.

    In August 2020, Navalny was hospitalized in serious condition after he was poisoned with a Novichok nerve agent. He was medically evacuated to Berlin and discharged a month later. Navalny accused Putin of being responsible for his poisoning and an investigation implicated agents from the Federal Security Service in his poisoning.

    On 17 January 2021, he returned to Russia and was detained on accusations of violating parole conditions (imposed as a result of his 2014 conviction) because he had failed to report to Russia's Federal Prison Service twice per month during his illness. Following his arrest and the release of the documentary Putin's Palace which accused Putin of corruption, mass protests across the country were held. On 2 February, he was given a prison sentence of over two and half years in a corrective labor colony in Vladimir Oblast. A resolution by the European Court of Human Rights called for his release. While in prison, Navalny and human rights groups have accused Russian authorities of using torture against him, and his health has significantly deteriorated.

    Here's a rough translation of the mentioned Instagram post announcing Navalny's hunger strike.

    Why do prisoners go on hunger strikes?

    This question worries only those who have not been prisoners. It all looks so complicated from the outside. But inside, everything is simple: you have no other way to fight back. Ha, ha, ha.

    Rather, there are still a couple, but it's better to save them.

    Who is lying in a robe, bald, with glasses on the bed with a Bible in his hands?

    It's me.

    Holding the Bible, because it's the only book I could get in three weeks. And on the bed (in a super scandalous violation of the rules), because I am on a hunger strike.

    Well, what to do? I have the right to call my own doctor and get medicine. They haven't given me either. The pain in my back is now in my legs. Parts of my right and now left leg have gone numb. All jokes aside, this is annoying.

    And instead of medical assistance, I am tortured with sleep deprivation (they wake me up 8 times a night), and the administration has been persuading the activist prisoners (aka "goats") to intimidate ordinary prisoners to not clean around my bed. They just say, “Lesha, I'm sorry, but we are stupidly afraid. This is the Vladimir region. The life of a prisoner is worth less than a pack of cigarettes.”

    Well, what to do? I am on a hunger strike, demanding that the law be obeyed and that a doctor of my choice be allowed to visit me. So I'm lying hungry, but with two legs.

    Stay healthy 😉

    6 votes