14 votes

Seven rural counties in Oregon have voted in favor of seceding to Idaho

11 comments

  1. Amarok
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    We should redraw all of the state borders anyway. Our historical map is utterly divorced from the geographic reality and the notion of having a self-sustaining state economy. Some states simply...

    We should redraw all of the state borders anyway. Our historical map is utterly divorced from the geographic reality and the notion of having a self-sustaining state economy. Some states simply aren't in a position to do that, and all of them should be. This video is a fun little history lesson and also shows us what proper borders would look like.

    I'm not sure this secession is anything more than a silly little protest. I'm also sure that within a couple of years, we're going to be adding some new states, and it's not out of the realm of possibility we may redraw some of the borders.

    7 votes
  2. [2]
    MimicSquid
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    Do we have any Oregonians here who'd like to provide some context? Would coastal Oregon be happy to let the inland parts be someone else's problem? Do they want to hold on to the territory? The...

    Do we have any Oregonians here who'd like to provide some context? Would coastal Oregon be happy to let the inland parts be someone else's problem? Do they want to hold on to the territory? The article said that Oregon's Democrat-controlled legislature would have to approve it, but made no comment on the likelihood.

    6 votes
    1. j3n
      Link Parent
      Oregonian not from one of the counties that voted, but from one that's usually included in these secessionist fantasy maps. I can't give any context for the Western half of the state, but I...

      Oregonian not from one of the counties that voted, but from one that's usually included in these secessionist fantasy maps. I can't give any context for the Western half of the state, but I sincerely hope they don't let it happen. I haven't spent a lot of time digging in to it, but my impression is that this is pretty much economic suicide for a region that's barely limping along on economic life support as it is.

      6 votes
  3. [2]
    skybrian
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    Idaho would become even more solidly conservative and Oregon more liberal, which seems like a move in the wrong direction, towards extremism and away from compromise.

    Idaho would become even more solidly conservative and Oregon more liberal, which seems like a move in the wrong direction, towards extremism and away from compromise.

    5 votes
    1. bub
      Link Parent
      The more urban areas in Idaho surrounding Boise have been making a slow push leftward for quite some time. It would be a real shame to see that become even more unlikely with the addition of yet...

      The more urban areas in Idaho surrounding Boise have been making a slow push leftward for quite some time. It would be a real shame to see that become even more unlikely with the addition of yet more hopelessly bumpkinated counties.

      Luckily none of this will ever happen.

      2 votes
  4. Echinops
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    Idaho has to agree, Oregon has to agree, and the federal congress has to agree. It's rather silly. They're infrastructure rates will increase, their minimum wage will decrease, they'll lose all...

    Idaho has to agree, Oregon has to agree, and the federal congress has to agree. It's rather silly. They're infrastructure rates will increase, their minimum wage will decrease, they'll lose all the pot revenue. Due to the low population size they won't gain representation federally. They'll lose more than they gain and us west siders won't have to subsidize ungrateful assholes. Aside from alfalfa and some beef, the west side can produce whatever we want in the fertile Willamette Valley.

    I say we charge the shit out of them to use our ports for the global market, let them go through Idaho east since they loathe us so much. They're literally biting the hand that feeds them and this will seal their death spiral into oblivion.

    5 votes
  5. [3]
    Cycloneblaze
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    I am very curious about this. Has anything like this happened before, counties moving between states?

    I am very curious about this. Has anything like this happened before, counties moving between states?

    4 votes
    1. [2]
      Amarok
      Link Parent
      Sort-of. West Virginia split off from Virginia in the 1860s. I'm not sure if there are other examples.

      Sort-of. West Virginia split off from Virginia in the 1860s. I'm not sure if there are other examples.

      6 votes
      1. j3n
        Link Parent
        There was some pretty significant national context to that though. I don't think it's comparable at all. The article itself seems to answer the question in the last paragraph: Based on that, it...

        There was some pretty significant national context to that though. I don't think it's comparable at all. The article itself seems to answer the question in the last paragraph:

        Congress has only approved measures to change state lines on three occasions: Kentucky was carved out of territory previously owned by Virginia in 1792. Maine was carved out of Massachusetts in 1820. And West Virginia was admitted to the union in 1863, in the midst of the Civil War, as Union counties separated themselves from the Confederacy.

        Based on that, it seems that there is no precedent for part of a state switching to another state, only new states being formed from land already covered by an existing state. I suppose that could come about as part of some weird deal where DC or PR is admitted alongside East Oregon to keep the knife-edge balance in the Senate.

        5 votes
  6. knocklessmonster
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    Does California count as having experience with a state trying to separate by party lines? In general this sort of thing happens where you have friction between a strong urban center. In CA it's...

    Does California count as having experience with a state trying to separate by party lines?

    In general this sort of thing happens where you have friction between a strong urban center. In CA it's Los Angeles and San Francisco, seen to dominate the state's vote by population. Orange County and San Diego are somehow exempt from this because they're historically conservative, despite their relatively high populations, but that's changing rapidly. Look at where the lines are drawn for all of these California proposals, and you'll see it's basically an attempt at electoral gerrymandering.

    The "Greater Idaho" thing is very similar. Most of Oregon's population is in the Willamette Valley between Portland (the largest at around 650k) Salem and Eugene (basically tied around 165k each). This is where the big cities and universities are. Combined, Eastern Oregon has less than half a million, check the green/blue/purple picture. They'll make any noise they want, but it's mostly because they feel they won't be adequately represented in the state of Oregon, being a minority of the population, so they want to cut out the cancer they feel is taking them over.

    I think we can mostly solve the issue of national representation by doing a popular vote wherever possible, but the issue still stands for those (mostly Republicans) who want to separate their states based on who votes for which party: They will always be the minority, and will always want to secede from what they see as an oppressive government.

    4 votes
  7. Kuromantis
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    Here's a map of the specific counties, alongside a map of what some people in this movement (????) seem to want Idaho to be.

    Here's a map of the specific counties, alongside a map of what some people in this movement (????) seem to want Idaho to be.

    3 votes
  8. Comment removed by site admin
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