8 votes

What has/have your government/school/college/teachers done to keep education flowing during this pandemic?

Admittedly keep education flowing is some corporate language. The only people who care about education are left-wing politicians and the actual teachers, neither of which matter now.

Anyway, my state government is broadcasting classes with 3 subjects from around 2PM to 4-4:20PM. The last subject of the day (3:30PM until the end) is only broadcast on the app they made and their YouTube channel unfortunately. All the classes are uploaded onto YouTube for posterity.

The app they made is mainly a chat, later limited to 15 messages as an attempt to stop copy-pasting from flooding the few meaningful/serious answers (it is a live chat with 20k people in it simultaneously so good riddance), to little avail IIRC. (IIRC because I watch by TV because my battery is limited and the screen is too small to actually copy to a textbook)

The quality is kinda mediocre but nothing bad enough usually. One time it was a 4:3 480p clip with interlacing, which is based until you start caring.

They are also sending us "handouts" (apostilas, PT-BR to English) and the normal state tests every bimester.

As for the teachers, they have sent us pretty much the full student workload via Google PDFs on WhatsApp, which is the opposite of private, but privacy is hardly possible when you're Brazilian and likely don't even have an up-to-date (defined as less than 5 years old LMAO ) PC. They haven't done any zoom/meet chats to teach us stuff however, since that's kind of the purpose of the TV/YouTube broadcast.

4 comments

  1. Pascia
    Link
    In Turkey, education stopped after first virus detection. 1 or 2 week later Ministry of education create 3 television channel named EBA TV for elementery, middle and high schools....

    In Turkey, education stopped after first virus detection. 1 or 2 week later Ministry of education create 3 television channel named EBA TV for elementery, middle and high schools. (https://imgur.com/a/KWF8Tfj) That channels broadcast the lessons for 09:00 AM to 09:30 PM for three replay. And that system supported with EBA web platform. A social-educational web site for schools. Platform not new, but became popular in lockdown. Class and teacher stayed in conversation for projects, questions or homeworks. (I took some reports some teachers create whatsapp groups, but goverment provide EBA platform for organisation) (https://imgur.com/PjQJDwO)

    Many students watched EBA TV and visit EBA. But that lessons will be taught in real schools too after corona (I hope this year). For this reason "lazy" students break conservation with teacher and start holiday early.

    Private schools usualy do their care. Many teachers went school for give a lesson with ZOOM. They took live videos for students. I don't know because private not popular so. Private courses more popular and they usually use same system as private schools.

    For my life, most important change is on university exam. (This exam very important for turkish students, because it nearly determine students life) I cant pass that exam last year and i decided try again in this year. But corona happened ! Education interupted and exam dont include second semester. I took exam from Math and science category. And too many important subjects are gone because education stop. We had a funny and very easy exam in corona environment and social distance. And I failed again. Because this exam cares about ranking. Not cares score. My score is better than last year, but everbody did very well this easy exam and my ranking dropped to 65.000~ thats not good rank for a good university.

    At start of new education season, nobody know what happens for goverment schools and universities. Cases are incresing in Turkey. Private education courses started this week for "compensatory education" at the their physical buildings. Wearing mask not forced in class, but necesary in corridors and other areas.

    5 votes
  2. Omnicrola
    Link
    I joined only recently, but the Center for Academic Innovation at the University of Michigan has been doing a ton of work to help teachers adapt their courses to online formats. This is on top of...

    I joined only recently, but the Center for Academic Innovation at the University of Michigan has been doing a ton of work to help teachers adapt their courses to online formats. This is on top of the already fairly sizable amount of work they've done over the past few years generating Massive Online Courses over the past few years.

    2 votes
  3. intuxikated
    Link
    I don't know how things are from a student's perspective. But our government is also doing things similar to yours, they broadcast classes through state owned channel (also uploads it on youtube),...

    I don't know how things are from a student's perspective. But our government is also doing things similar to yours, they broadcast classes through state owned channel (also uploads it on youtube), they have timing arrangement for each grades. But they only teach one subject a day, teachers are directed to clear doubts and check homeworks of their student. Teachers can use any method for communication most of them use WhatsApp.

    Recently due to the flooding and landslides new classes are not broadcasted.

    1 vote
  4. Atvelonis
    Link
    Most of the changes that the undergraduate institutions I'm affiliated with are making on an institutional level to accommodate in-person housing and learning revolve around keeping students and...

    Most of the changes that the undergraduate institutions I'm affiliated with are making on an institutional level to accommodate in-person housing and learning revolve around keeping students and faculty safe in their respective environments. I would call that indirectly "keeping education flowing." That students are returning at all is somewhat questionable, although in the contexts of these particular schools, I'm not worried. They have small and prudent student bodies who I think are unusually capable of self-policing, not to mention the actual campus police.

    Administratively, the colleges have designed systems that will allow professors to teach remotely (with students living on campus) in a fairly robust way. Even the few classes that are being taught in person are all being recorded, so that students who are unable to attend class (immunocompromised, quarantining, etc.) will not be left out. I believe they've provided some direct training to faculty about operating classes in the pandemic, although I'm not privy to structural lecture details. Some departments have reduced major requirements for students in the next few graduating classes, as many multi-semester schedules have been ruined by the pandemic. At least some professors have proactively reached out to students to explain the structure of their courses in the fall. Admin is also taking a somewhat more active role in helping first-years navigate the academic environment, pushing faculty pre-major advisors to provide more support earlier on than they might have in the past. The student-led orientation programs that are designed to help first-years adjust socially and academically (both during orientation week and throughout the entire year) are also in play more or less as planned. Upperclassman leaders are currently receiving training for living with and guiding first-years through social and academic processes, and will finish in September, when the rest of the student body returns.

    As for behavioral student guidelines to facilitate in-person living/learning during the pandemic:

    • Almost all classes are being conducted remotely, except for those that strictly need to be in person, or those whose professors apparently aren't worried about the virus. Class times have been vastly spread out to decrease traffic and class sizes are seemingly being reduced overall. In-person classrooms should allow for social distancing. The libraries are cutting capacity in half outright to accommodate socially distanced seating, and also plan to offer alternative spaces on campus to study. Study groups are certainly allowed, but again, only while masked, and spaces for such things have been reduced in size to encourage more limited contact. Buses between affiliated colleges are still operating, but since most classes are online, my understanding is that they will be utilized less overall.
    • Universal mask usage is being stressed very hard (I would say students are about as worried as admin). Social distancing guidelines are in place everywhere except for small "living pods." Students who are quarantining have separate dedicated housing. Indoor athletic facilities are not operating at all. Varsity teams can practice or exercise in groups of up to nine students at a time, but only if outdoors, masked, and entirely socially distanced. Administrative offices appear to have moved to outdoor tents, and the dining centers have limited capacity and will be mostly just be doing take-out. Students can have one (1) unmasked visitor in their personal space at a time, but only those within the community (i.e. not friends from other colleges). Social gatherings are limited to groups of 15 or fewer, must take place in designated areas, and must be socially distanced. The campuses are small enough that campus police can definitely disperse violating groups quickly, especially since there are no fraternities or sororities who would be inclined toward such things, and virtually all housing is owned by the colleges to begin with. But, as I said, the student bodies are ethically self-policing, so I honestly don't think it would come to this. They have the foresight (and informal social pressure mechanisms) to hold off for a single semester.
    • Off-campus travel is highly discouraged (all but prohibited), minus emergencies or grocery shopping. Students will not have a fall break, but will go home (and stay home) at Thanksgiving. Perhaps most importantly, the cost of housing for the semester is subsequently being reduced.

    I've mentioned in previous comments that one of the most important parts about an education at any level is the freedom of students to collaborate with and learn from each other. This is impossible to do remotely to anywhere near the extent that it could be done in person, so the aforementioned measures to make living together safe do ultimately have a strong academic benefit. They give students ways to remain focused on academics while also not losing touch with their social lives (which go hand-in-hand for most people), and by extension themselves. And I'm pretty sure that it's going to work.

    1 vote