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    1. Would anyone like to learn Spanish with me?

      I have a pretty solid start to learning Spanish. I took two and a half years of it in high school and have not lost much of what I learned then. I'm wanting to get back and become fluent in it. As...

      I have a pretty solid start to learning Spanish. I took two and a half years of it in high school and have not lost much of what I learned then. I'm wanting to get back and become fluent in it. As such, I am flying through Duolingo lessons right now to get to new content.

      In order to keep myself honest and working on learning it, I would like somebody (or multiple-body) to practice with and compete on Duolingo, communicate in Spanish online in typed text, and possibly in voice calls. If you're new to Spanish, don't be discouraged by my two years of learning, I can help with any questions you have about the content to the best of my ability.

      This is the perfect time to learn a new language. If you would like to join me, please leave a comment or send a PM, whichever you prefer. I will PM my Duolingo code to you so we can be friends there. If enough people decide to do it, I can make a Matrix group or Discord server for us.

      18 votes
    2. Let's come up with some isograms for fun!

      Before we get started, the word isogram has multiple definitions according to Wikipedia so to clarify, the definition I'm intending is: A word without any repeating letters So, no letter can...

      Before we get started, the word isogram has multiple definitions according to Wikipedia so to clarify, the definition I'm intending is:

      A word without any repeating letters

      So, no letter can appear more than once in the word. As the length increases, the possibilities decrease (and the better it gets!). Here's some examples:

      • The word isogram itself. This makes the word autological, the expressed property applies to itself. Neat!
      • Tildes We've been on an isogram website all along! :O
      • Spectria And they're also the organization running the website! :OO
      • Deimos, even the owner's name is an isogram! My god!!!

      Here's some examples that aren't isograms:

      • Unique There's 2 us! Ew!
      • Banana 3 as and 2 ns?! Disgusting!
      • Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious Good heavens! 3 ss, 2 us, 2 ps, 2 es, 2 rs, 3 cs, 3 as, 3 ls, 7 is and 2 os!!! What! Yes... I counted. Just kidding I made a program do it. :P

      Now it's up to you. What can you come up with?

      12 votes
    3. Learning English from the ground up

      There was a recent thread on ~talk about which linguistics habits people find annoying, and much to my horror, I have most of those which were mentioned. After thinking about it a little more, I...

      There was a recent thread on ~talk about which linguistics habits people find annoying, and much to my horror, I have most of those which were mentioned. After thinking about it a little more, I realized that a lot of these habits were picked up from the media I consume and the people I interact with. I also feel that this problem is exacerbated by my poor knowledge of English grammar.

      While I was taught grammar at an elementary level in school, I didn't quite grok it back then, and mostly relied on my instinct, as to what "sounded" right. I have since forgotten most of what I had learnt, and my instinct is failing me - my grammar is atrocious, my punctuation is terrible and I only have auto-correct to thank for my spelling.

      I understand that English, like other languages, is constantly evolving. What is wrong now might be right tomorrow. However, I believe that this is no excuse for my shortcomings as there is merit speaking and writing in accordance with what is considered correct in the present day.

      I would like to learn English from "first principles", and would greatly appreciate if some users could suggest some books/resources which could help me (bonus points for resources pertaining to British English). Any other suggestions would also be great.

      Thanks, and have a nice day.

      24 votes
    4. What linguistics habits annoy you?

      Habits can be good! I mean, if you build the good ones of course. But ya know, sometimes people fall into habits that annoy you. I mean, they probably don't know that they're annoying you. Or that...

      Habits can be good! I mean, if you build the good ones of course. But ya know, sometimes people fall into habits that annoy you. I mean, they probably don't know that they're annoying you. Or that they've fallen into the habit at all! What linguistic habits have you noticed in yourself (or others) that drives you up the wall?

      26 votes
    5. What is the most interesting feature you've seen in a language?

      For me, it's definitely the topic particles in Japanese. It just seems like a really interesting thing that is a reason enough to want to learn Japanese, even excluding other great features it...

      For me, it's definitely the topic particles in Japanese. It just seems like a really interesting thing that is a reason enough to want to learn Japanese, even excluding other great features it has. Here some info on them.

      30 votes
    6. Should languages keep historical artifacts?

      Three examples : American English have lost the u in word like "color", because it is closer to its phonetics (the u is silent and there's no particular sound associated with "ou"). The letter u...

      Three examples :

      American English have lost the u in word like "color", because it is closer to its phonetics (the u is silent and there's no particular sound associated with "ou"). The letter u has an anglo-norman root.

      Swiss French (and for this particular example Belgian French) differs little from standard French, apart from the numbering system. It is ironically more metric than standard French since it streamlines what's left of the base 20 (vigisimasomething) system, i. e. it's "seventy and eighty" ("septante et huitante*") instead of "sixty-ten and four-twenties" ("soixante-dix et quatre-vingts". Historically people all over the world used some sort of base 20 system, probably because we have twenty toes and fingers.

      *no one ever use "octante". Belgian people think the Swiss uses it, while Swiss people thinks the Belgian it. I don't know why its that.

      Swiss standard German (not dialect) have ditched the Eszett ligature (ß) in favor of a more simple "ss ". That ligature was more common in the middle age.


      With those example in mind, do you find value in the "old" vs the "new" way of writing?

      (in other words: spelling reformer partisan and opponent : what goes through your mind?)

      6 votes