19 votes

Having been on Android for over a decade, I just got my first iPhone! What should I know?

So far I have been having a surprisingly easy time learning iOS. It is incredibly intuitive! Though to be fair, my friend who has always been on iOS said the same thing about Android when she switched.

There are so many things that are basically identical on the two operating systems. But I am sure I am missing out on a lot of things that my iPhone 13 can do that my Samsung A50 could not do.

So far I'm really loving the switch, everything feels smooth. But I am very accepting of any tips and tricks that anyone might have up their sleeves! 😊

46 comments

  1. [12]
    tomf
    Link
    this is probably true with Android, but you can long-press the spacebar to move the caret from side to side. Check out Ordinary Puzzles. Its a fun puzzle game that isn't too difficult.

    this is probably true with Android, but you can long-press the spacebar to move the caret from side to side.

    Check out Ordinary Puzzles. Its a fun puzzle game that isn't too difficult.

    11 votes
    1. [2]
      kfwyre
      Link Parent
      Not OP, but as a recent iOS convert, thank you SO much for this tip! I’ve hated having to fat finger caret positioning within the text itself for a long time now and am thrilled to know that there...

      you can long-press the spacebar to move the caret from side to side.

      Not OP, but as a recent iOS convert, thank you SO much for this tip! I’ve hated having to fat finger caret positioning within the text itself for a long time now and am thrilled to know that there is a better way.

      7 votes
      1. tomf
        Link Parent
        I shit you not -- this trick went through boomer circles first a while ago and we're all late to learning it. :) We can never tell them.

        I shit you not -- this trick went through boomer circles first a while ago and we're all late to learning it. :) We can never tell them.

        7 votes
    2. [2]
      Liru
      Link Parent
      Confirming that this works on Android 12, at least.

      Confirming that this works on Android 12, at least.

      5 votes
      1. mtset
        Link Parent
        Yeah, this was a key selling point of Swype for Android like eight years ago. Good stuff!

        Yeah, this was a key selling point of Swype for Android like eight years ago. Good stuff!

        2 votes
    3. [6]
      NomadicCoder
      Link Parent
      Thanks for the game suggestion -- I've had my iPhone for a long time, but never saw that one. I like puzzles like that which don't require a lot of time investment, but can keep you occupied...

      Thanks for the game suggestion -- I've had my iPhone for a long time, but never saw that one. I like puzzles like that which don't require a lot of time investment, but can keep you occupied during those otherwise wasted moments.

      5 votes
      1. [5]
        tomf
        Link Parent
        its perfect for that. Also get Simon Tatham's Portable Puzzle Collection. Both are open source and don't have any sort of cost or upgrades. Get them from the app store, but here are the main pages...

        its perfect for that. Also get Simon Tatham's Portable Puzzle Collection. Both are open source and don't have any sort of cost or upgrades. Get them from the app store, but here are the main pages for them.

        3 votes
        1. [4]
          NomadicCoder
          Link Parent
          Those are great! Not overly flashy, right to the point... I like it!

          Those are great! Not overly flashy, right to the point... I like it!

          2 votes
          1. [3]
            tomf
            Link Parent
            its hard to find good FOSS games. I'm not all Stallman or anything, but I also don't want a bunch of ads or 'rewards' or whatever -- just give me the puzzle. :) If you find any others, let me...

            its hard to find good FOSS games. I'm not all Stallman or anything, but I also don't want a bunch of ads or 'rewards' or whatever -- just give me the puzzle. :)

            If you find any others, let me know. I'm always on the hunt for new puzzle games. With Tatham's collection, I mostly play Galaxies, Cube, Guess, Inertia, Net, Pearl, Singles, Untangle, and Flood.

            quick edit: for galaxies and some others, go into the custom options to make the board bigger once you get the hang of it. The default settings are a little too easy after a few rounds.

            1 vote
            1. [2]
              NomadicCoder
              Link Parent
              Galaxies is great, that was one of the early ones that I discovered while playing with the collection. I'm working through your favorites list now, Perl is probably my second favorite so far....

              Galaxies is great, that was one of the early ones that I discovered while playing with the collection. I'm working through your favorites list now, Perl is probably my second favorite so far. Untangle and Net are nice, but not quite as stimulating.

              2 votes
              1. tomf
                Link Parent
                I like Net at 14x22 -- which is about as much as my fingers can handle on this phone. Puzzles also has Sudoku, I believe, but I never got into that. I should, though. But I also want to get into Go.

                I like Net at 14x22 -- which is about as much as my fingers can handle on this phone. Puzzles also has Sudoku, I believe, but I never got into that. I should, though. But I also want to get into Go.

    4. smoontjes
      Link Parent
      Wow thank you for that spacebar one! I kept selecting all the text and fumbling around

      Wow thank you for that spacebar one! I kept selecting all the text and fumbling around

      2 votes
  2. [3]
    kwyjibo
    Link
    Make sure you go through accessibility settings. Apple's accessibility support is bar none the best in the industry and there are some stuff in there anyone can take advantage of. I too have...

    Make sure you go through accessibility settings. Apple's accessibility support is bar none the best in the industry and there are some stuff in there anyone can take advantage of.

    I too have recently switched to an iPhone 13 from iPhone SE (1st gen) and the change in screen size was drastic. I had to use the phone with both of my hands, which I disliked quite a bit, but I came across the back tap settings in accessibility. It's pretty customizable but I set it up so that when I double tap on the back of the phone I activate reachability (I'm aware of the default way, it was just wonky for me), and when I triple tap I get the control center. It made it a lot easier for me to use the phone with a single hand.

    9 votes
    1. [2]
      NomadicCoder
      Link Parent
      I use the triple click home (iPhone SE 2020) accessibility shortcut to toggle the reduce white point at night -- even at lowest brightness and dark mode I find my phone to be a bit too bright for...

      I use the triple click home (iPhone SE 2020) accessibility shortcut to toggle the reduce white point at night -- even at lowest brightness and dark mode I find my phone to be a bit too bright for my liking, so the reduced white point makes it much better.

      3 votes
      1. kwyjibo
        Link Parent
        Whoa, I didn't know about the white point setting! I must have overlooked. This will help my eyes when I use my phone at night. Thank you for pointing it out.

        Whoa, I didn't know about the white point setting! I must have overlooked. This will help my eyes when I use my phone at night. Thank you for pointing it out.

        2 votes
  3. [3]
    kfwyre
    (edited )
    Link
    On the App Store, scroll down to the “App Privacy” section for things you’re interested in downloading. It gives a granular breakdown for different categories on what is collected, and you’d be...

    On the App Store, scroll down to the “App Privacy” section for things you’re interested in downloading. It gives a granular breakdown for different categories on what is collected, and you’d be surprised at how many apps take everything including contact info, search history, and location data.

    Also, if you’re using Apple Music, you can use alternate frontend apps to browse your library and play music. I use both Albums and Marvis Pro. Albums is good for listening straight through an album (hence the title), and I use Marvis Pro for individual songs, playlists, and library browsing because I like the interface. The secret sauce for me is that even though each app technically plays music through the main Apple Music app, each one holds your “spot” on what you’re listening to independently. Thus, if I’m halfway through something on Albums but decide to play a few songs off of a playlist on Marvis Pro, when I return to Albums it’ll still be stopped where I left off (and vice versa).

    Also, AdGuard is a very good ad-blocker for Safari.

    8 votes
    1. [2]
      smoontjes
      Link Parent
      I use Spotify, I'll see if it works with that too! I've come to dislike their app. And thank you for linking me to an ad-blocker! I was actually worried it wouldn't be possible to block ads on iOS...

      I use Spotify, I'll see if it works with that too! I've come to dislike their app.

      And thank you for linking me to an ad-blocker! I was actually worried it wouldn't be possible to block ads on iOS (not sure why I thought so)

      3 votes
      1. Weldawadyathink
        Link Parent
        FYI those apps will not work with Spotify. They only work with Apple Music. I would highly recommend giving the free trial a go and maybe switch from Spotify to Apple Music.

        FYI those apps will not work with Spotify. They only work with Apple Music. I would highly recommend giving the free trial a go and maybe switch from Spotify to Apple Music.

        3 votes
  4. [5]
    Adys
    Link
    What bothered me the most early on with iOS was the lack of ability to organise the Home Screen, as well as the poorer (imo) autocorrect. AirPods are really good, I used those on Android and on...

    What bothered me the most early on with iOS was the lack of ability to organise the Home Screen, as well as the poorer (imo) autocorrect.

    AirPods are really good, I used those on Android and on iOS they’re even better.

    In terms of accessories I love the iPhone wallet (card holder). Carries up to three standard size cards.

    5 votes
    1. [4]
      teaearlgraycold
      Link Parent
      Why not just load those cards into the digital wallet?

      Why not just load those cards into the digital wallet?

      2 votes
      1. [2]
        Adys
        Link Parent
        Because two of them are my ID (French and Belgian eIDs) which I’m legally required to carry and the third one is a NFC transport pass which isn’t, to my knowledge, loadable onto a digital wallet

        Because two of them are my ID (French and Belgian eIDs) which I’m legally required to carry and the third one is a NFC transport pass which isn’t, to my knowledge, loadable onto a digital wallet

        7 votes
        1. kari
          Link Parent
          Also, at least here in the US, not everywhere accepts Apple Pay (I mean, we're way behind on payment tech so not surprising). I have all my cards in my digital wallet, but I also carry a debit...

          Also, at least here in the US, not everywhere accepts Apple Pay (I mean, we're way behind on payment tech so not surprising). I have all my cards in my digital wallet, but I also carry a debit card, a credit card, and my driver's license in my MagSafe wallet.

          1 vote
      2. babypuncher
        Link Parent
        Not all retailers accept Apple Pay yet

        Not all retailers accept Apple Pay yet

        2 votes
  5. ali
    Link
    If you’re using a Mac or iPad as well, the shared clipboard is very nice. You can also have a tab open on either device, and then open that link on any other device. In the iPhone you have to use...

    If you’re using a Mac or iPad as well, the shared clipboard is very nice. You can also have a tab open on either device, and then open that link on any other device. In the iPhone you have to use the app switcher for that.

    5 votes
  6. [6]
    soks_n_sandals
    Link
    FaceID for passwords and app access works really well. I always fought my fingerprint reader on my last android. The sleep settings for do not disturb are also great. The notification granularity...

    FaceID for passwords and app access works really well. I always fought my fingerprint reader on my last android.

    The sleep settings for do not disturb are also great.

    The notification granularity is a blessing and a curse, but you can adjust notifications for the lock screen, app icons on the home screen for a given app.

    Apple Maps (in the US) is hilariously more useful than Google Maps for navigation. I never thought I'd see the day, but it's like Google wants to lose marketshare here.

    There's a lot of power in the automation through Shortcuts. I'm not an expert on them but there are cool examples online.

    I never set up my Google wallet, but I did setup my apple wallet and use it for concert tickets and airline travel and it's been flawless.

    There are definitely things I miss about the android OS that the iPhone just doesn't have or can't do, but the tradeoffs are more or less even. Good luck!

    4 votes
    1. [5]
      hungariantoast
      (edited )
      Link Parent
      I also got an iPhone recently. After reading your comment I decided to use Apple Maps for my three-ish hour drive from San Antonio to Houston, taking I-10. Traffic was great today, compared to how...

      Apple Maps (in the US) is hilariously more useful than Google Maps for navigation. I never thought I'd see the day, but it's like Google wants to lose marketshare here.

      I also got an iPhone recently. After reading your comment I decided to use Apple Maps for my three-ish hour drive from San Antonio to Houston, taking I-10.

      Traffic was great today, compared to how it usually is. With no slow downs, I cannot say if Apple Maps does a better job redirecting around traffic and saving time, but the app didn’t give me any warnings about objects in the road or speed traps. Google Maps reports that info to me every single time I make this trip, which is far more often than I would like to, and each trip the information turns out to be useful.

      Then, when I actually got into Houston, Apple Maps straight up broke and stopped giving me directions or updates. I already had the route memorized so I actually didn’t need the app, but Google Maps has never just stopped working or crashed.

      Thankfully restarting navigation is easy and hands free using Siri. Apple Maps also actually handles the Katy tollway unlike Google Maps that freaks out and endlessly reroutes until I get back onto the interstate.

      I’ve noticed in some instances Apple Map’s auditory instructions are more detailed and useful than Google’s. Today it told me something like “not at this light, but at the next, get in the left lane to turn left”.

      I’ll try Apple Maps again when I make the trip back (bleh) and hopefully my experience today was just a fluke. I actually want Apple Maps to work better for me than Google’s, because getting an iPhone was part of a process of removing Google from my life.


      For anyone curious:

      Through Apple’s upgrade program and a $30 ACP credit for my phone bill, I only spend about $100 more per year on a smartphone than I did with Android/Google Fi, but the phone I get is of much higher quality, I have five times more data on my plan, and two instances of theft/loss replacement every twelve months. If I upgrade every twelve months I’m basically getting a new iPhone at 50% off, and thanks to the Affordable Connectivity Program my phone bill is free.

      6 votes
      1. [3]
        mtset
        Link Parent
        It's a bit of a tangent, but I honestly do not understand why people lease phones. Since high school I've bought my phones outright (at $50, $150, $300, and most recently $450) and each has lasted...

        I only spend about $100 more per year on a smartphone

        It's a bit of a tangent, but I honestly do not understand why people lease phones. Since high school I've bought my phones outright (at $50, $150, $300, and most recently $450) and each has lasted for several years, with the exception of the Pixel 3A I yeeted off a balcony by accident a week after the warranty ran out. Along with my Ting service, I end up paying less than $200 per year. What are the benefits? Am I missing out?

        3 votes
        1. [2]
          hungariantoast
          Link Parent
          With a combination of Google Fi and a cheap Android phone every two years, I was spending about $415 a year on a smartphone, excluding accessories like cables and screen protectors. The Android...

          With a combination of Google Fi and a cheap Android phone every two years, I was spending about $415 a year on a smartphone, excluding accessories like cables and screen protectors.

          The Android phone I got was normally $300, but $150 on sale. It received exactly one major Android version upgrade, and stopped receiving security updates after two years. Battery life had heavily degraded after two years as well. Performance/smoothness was never great. If the phone had good LineageOS support, I could have tolerated using it for longer, like I did with my Nexus 5X that I owned for five years. It was not supported by LineageOS though, and I really didn't feel like figuring out how to build my own ROM.

          Now, because I am a student who receives financial aid, I automatically qualify for the Affordable Connectivity Program, that offers me a $30/month credit towards an internet access bill. Because home internet access is included with rent at my apartment, I decided to apply the ACP towards my phone bill. So my phone bill is now free.

          I could have bumped up the amount I spend on an Android phone and got a respectable mid-range device that would probably last me more than two years. This would have significantly reduced the amount I spend every year on a smartphone, but I specifically did not want another Android device, and am generally trying to move away from using any of Google's services.

          Enter Apple's iPhone Upgrade Program. Through the program, I spend about $40 every month, and can upgrade to a new iPhone after I make twelve payments. The total yearly cost of the program is $507. This also includes "AppleCare" coverage for accidental damage, and loss or theft replacement.

          So I'm spending about $100 more a year on a smartphone, but the smartphone I am getting is of much higher quality than before, and I get a new one at no extra cost every twelve months.

          I definitely could have stuck with Android and reduced my yearly average smartphone expense considerably, but I specifically wanted to get away from Android.

          Apple/iOS is not overwhelmingly better than Google/Android. It's a compromise at best, but what I "value" in a smartphone has shifted recently and this was the path that most aligned with those "values".

          Both companies are still terrible. Both companies should still be legislatively rendered unrecognizable. The smartphone duopoly sucks.

          2 votes
          1. mtset
            Link Parent
            This is a great breakdown, thank you! It sounds like the main benefits are that you get AppleCare (which seem to be an upgraded warranty program, like Preferred Care for Pixel devices?) and a new...

            This is a great breakdown, thank you! It sounds like the main benefits are that you get AppleCare (which seem to be an upgraded warranty program, like Preferred Care for Pixel devices?) and a new device every year.

            I can definitely see how that would make sense, especially with ACP. I still shudder a bit at the idea of paying half a grand every year for a phone, but I'm glad it works for you!

            1 vote
      2. kari
        Link Parent
        I use Apple Maps for Austin to and from DFW pretty often and it's decent. I generally just use it because I don't like Google, but I think it's generally on par with Google Maps. Reroutes for...

        I use Apple Maps for Austin to and from DFW pretty often and it's decent. I generally just use it because I don't like Google, but I think it's generally on par with Google Maps.

        Reroutes for traffic are okay, but a little delayed IMO. For example, some times it won't notify me that taking Loop 340 in Waco will be faster than 35, but if I pull up the full-route view in the CarPlay app it'll show it as a faster option. I do get less info about stuff on the road, but I think maybe that's because Google can use Waze's data where people tend to be pretty active about reports compared to Apple Maps, where people presumably aren't.

        My favorite thing by far is that Apple Maps will show/tell you, like you said, information about lights, stop signs, etc. which can be really helpful when trying to find where to turn in a place you've never been before.

        1 vote
  7. [2]
    stu2b50
    Link
    The siri widget is kind of neat. It uses "mAchIne LeARnINg" to learn what apps you use at what times and shows them. The widget is almost indistinguishable from the normal array of apps on the...

    The siri widget is kind of neat. It uses "mAchIne LeARnINg" to learn what apps you use at what times and shows them. The widget is almost indistinguishable from the normal array of apps on the home screen. Not for everyone, some people prefer muscle memory.

    If you tap on the area next to the notch, it'll automatically scroll to the top.

    Consider other parts of the ecosystem. Apple Watch is really good.

    There's a number of neat features that are in accessibility, which can be useful to everyone. There's a option to be able to tap the back of your phone as a virtual button, for instance.

    Swipe from left to right is usually, although not always, a gesture that does what the "back" button on Android does.

    I think Live photos is genuinely a really cool feature (it basically records a short video before and after the picture, and when you view the photo it'll show the video. Kinda Harry Potter photo-ish. Really neat for things like, say, a toast). I'd leave it on or turn it on for a bit to give it a shot.

    4 votes
    1. kari
      Link Parent
      Ha, I love my Siri widget just because it'll tell me to pull up the Maps route to places I've only been to a few times but at roughly the same time and day of the week. For example, I got Cabo...

      Ha, I love my Siri widget just because it'll tell me to pull up the Maps route to places I've only been to a few times but at roughly the same time and day of the week. For example, I got Cabo Bob's (kind of like an Austin-based Chipotle) for dinner two or three Monday's in a row, and Siri was suggesting it as a location to go to.

      3 votes
  8. Akir
    Link
    iOS has a "magnifier" app that is incredibly useful for spying into hard-to-see spaces. It even has a control for the light so you can see in recessed spaces and filters that help if you're...

    iOS has a "magnifier" app that is incredibly useful for spying into hard-to-see spaces. It even has a control for the light so you can see in recessed spaces and filters that help if you're dealing with odd lighting or have issues with color perception.

    There's also a measurement app, but YMMV when it comes to accuracy. I think it's supposed to be much better on models with LIDAR (including your 13).

    As others have mentioned, integration with other Apple products is unparalleled, and it's particularly great if you have a Mac.

    3 votes
  9. Immortal
    Link
    You can disable sending (blue) text messages with your phone number in iMessage and set it to whatever email you want. Even if someone uses your number, you'll always reply with your email if you...

    You can disable sending (blue) text messages with your phone number in iMessage and set it to whatever email you want. Even if someone uses your number, you'll always reply with your email if you set it to do that. It's pretty cool if you don't want to share your number with everyone but still may want to text them.

    3 votes
  10. [2]
    Varth
    Link
    Not a iPhone user but I'm decently familiar with iOS. When I first started learning my way around it, it took me way too long to realize that swiping down on a key will quickly type its secondary...

    Not a iPhone user but I'm decently familiar with iOS. When I first started learning my way around it, it took me way too long to realize that swiping down on a key will quickly type its secondary character, much like pressing and holding the key on most Android keyboards. Great for quick access to punctuation.

    2 votes
    1. 0d_billie
      Link Parent
      I always thought this was iPad only! i'll be giving it a try on my spare phone now :D

      I always thought this was iPad only! i'll be giving it a try on my spare phone now :D

      2 votes
  11. [10]
    lou
    Link
    Don't try doing things in non-Apple ways. Use iTunes, subscribe to iCloud, and get a Mac if you don't have one. Surrender yourself completely to the notion that you must adapt to the iPhone and...

    Don't try doing things in non-Apple ways. Use iTunes, subscribe to iCloud, and get a Mac if you don't have one. Surrender yourself completely to the notion that you must adapt to the iPhone and not the opposite. Don't fight, be water.

    2 votes
    1. [9]
      teaearlgraycold
      Link Parent
      Or be like me. Use Windows on your computer and Spotify, Google Maps, etc. on your iPhone. No complaints.

      Or be like me. Use Windows on your computer and Spotify, Google Maps, etc. on your iPhone. No complaints.

      6 votes
      1. [8]
        lou
        Link Parent
        There's iTunes for Windows right? I assume it's okay. Problem is trying to bipass Apple completely and doing things the Android way, like, for example, treating internal storage as something you...

        There's iTunes for Windows right? I assume it's okay. Problem is trying to bipass Apple completely and doing things the Android way, like, for example, treating internal storage as something you actually own.

        2 votes
        1. [6]
          stu2b50
          Link Parent
          There still is iTunes for windows, although it's not well maintained (fun fact - iTunes doesn't exist for macs anymore). It's not really that important anymore because phones are to a much greater...

          There still is iTunes for windows, although it's not well maintained (fun fact - iTunes doesn't exist for macs anymore). It's not really that important anymore because phones are to a much greater extent independent computing devices. Very few people have a reason to actually connect their phone to their computers (other than developers, of course). Music? Streaming. Video? Streaming. Moving photos off? Cloud. Backups? Cloud. Installing apps? App store.

          treating internal storage as something you actually own.

          It's more a difference in philosophy in how filesystems are scoped. If you were to run a Linux distro, and exclusively install flatpaks, for instance, you'd have similar restrictions to an iPhone. And while that is a tradeoff, there are benefits - there's a reason why flatpaks are increasingly popular.

          3 votes
          1. lou
            Link Parent
            Sure. I actually do wish to transfer files over cable quite often, but most people have no such needs.

            Sure. I actually do wish to transfer files over cable quite often, but most people have no such needs.

            2 votes
          2. [4]
            hungariantoast
            Link Parent
            Music? Subscription. Video? Subscription. Moving photos off? Subscription. Backups? Subscription. Installing apps? Subscription (or lifetime access for just $60!!!). Honestly, the only reason I...

            Music? Subscription. Video? Subscription. Moving photos off? Subscription. Backups? Subscription. Installing apps? Subscription (or lifetime access for just $60!!!).

            Honestly, the only reason I can pay what is essentially a subscription for a new iPhone every year, is because I don't waste my money on other subscription services whose content I can manage myself. Apple does not make that easy though.

            The first thing I wanted to do when I got my iPhone was put my offline music library on it. As far as I can tell, there are zero ways to upload my music to my Apple Music account via the website and download it offline on my iPhone using the official Music app. This was something Google Play Music excelled at, before Google did the thing they always do and killed the app.

            The only way I can get my music onto my iPhone, and play it through the official Music app, is to sync my music library from my Linux laptop to my Windows desktop, load and organize my library into iTunes, and then sync it to my phone. That's so much more complicated and a pain in the ass than it has to be.

            The easiest, immediate solution I found was to run a temporary Jellyfin server on my laptop and use Finamp to download the music so it could be played offline.

            Maybe I just need to get with the times and subscribe to ten different streaming services and an unlimited data plan, but I would rather not impoverish myself.

            1. [3]
              stu2b50
              Link Parent
              You don't have to use subscription services for those things, it's just that, iPhone or not, most people do these days. The economics are, in the end, good for people, especially for music - as a...

              You don't have to use subscription services for those things, it's just that, iPhone or not, most people do these days. The economics are, in the end, good for people, especially for music - as a pretty basic music listener, as I'd imagine most people are, the access to essentially all music, new and old, is a lot of value, and I definitely do not miss buying CDs, albums on iTunes, or praying for the radio to play songs you like.

              But you don't have. Just get something like https://apps.apple.com/us/app/foobar2000/id1072807669 foobar, which can both sync with itunes, or just put your music on a cloud storage service and then import it to foobar. Is that a subscription? Not necessarily, there's more than enough free storaged offered by Google and Microsoft to cover musical needs, although Apple itself is quite stingy. I'm sure there is a way to do it with a cable but I wouldn't know, haven't done that in a long time.


              Also, the best way definitely is to just run a Plex server with your media on it. You can download media for offline viewing in the clients.

              1 vote
              1. [2]
                hungariantoast
                Link Parent
                This requires... surprise! Another subscription! Plex rent-seeks $5/month for the privilege to download media for offline access. This was the first app I tried. Not only is it not immediately...

                Also, the best way definitely is to just run a Plex server with your media on it. You can download media for offline viewing in the clients.

                This requires... surprise! Another subscription! Plex rent-seeks $5/month for the privilege to download media for offline access.

                Just get something like foobar

                This was the first app I tried. Not only is it not immediately obvious that you can just import music from a cloud service (on first launch, the app directs you to set up a FTP server instead), but that is yet another subscription. Sure, you could theoretically load your music, 15 GB at a time, onto your device, but that's a terrible experience.

                It seems like Finamp will work for me. It's a shame Apple's ecosystem is, at best, a compromise over Google's though.

                1. psi
                  Link Parent
                  It doesn't require a subscription – you can buy a lifetime Plex pass outright for ~$90 on sale. Of course, it's a hard bargain when free alternatives exist, but personally I find plex/plexamp...

                  This requires... surprise! Another subscription! Plex rent-seeks $5/month for the privilege to download media for offline access.

                  It doesn't require a subscription – you can buy a lifetime Plex pass outright for ~$90 on sale. Of course, it's a hard bargain when free alternatives exist, but personally I find plex/plexamp great for managing my music library, so personally I think it's worth the cost.

                  2 votes
        2. teaearlgraycold
          Link Parent
          As @stu2b50 said - there's no reason to even have iTunes on my Windows computer. I carry a USB drive on my keychain for every-day-carry portable storage.

          As @stu2b50 said - there's no reason to even have iTunes on my Windows computer. I carry a USB drive on my keychain for every-day-carry portable storage.

          3 votes