17 votes

Rogers CEO says service back online for most customers, blames outage on 'network system failure'

6 comments

  1. [6]
    cfabbro
    (edited )
    Link
    In case anyone outside Canada wasn't aware, yesterday (and part of today) almost the entire country experienced a massive service outage. Everything from cell phone service, television service,...

    In case anyone outside Canada wasn't aware, yesterday (and part of today) almost the entire country experienced a massive service outage. Everything from cell phone service, television service, internet service, banking/business transactions systems, transit systems, government offices, and even our emergency services, was affected.

    I'm a Bell customer, not Rogers, but even our internet slowed to a crawl yesterday, since so many people without service on Rogers network switched over to the Bell network in order to keep things operational, and stay connected. Thankfully things seem to have mostly recovered now, but it was an absolute mess.

    We REALLY need to start doing something about the fucking Telco/ISP oligopoly here in Canada. Hopefully this will finally be the wake-up call needed for our politicians to actually do something about this crap. The status quo of abysmal, overpriced, non-competitive services has been accepted for way too long in this country.

    15 votes
    1. highsomatic
      Link Parent
      The irony of working for the other big telco but having to take the day off because you can’t connect from home. All our meetings have been postponed to Monday because of this crap. My whole...

      The irony of working for the other big telco but having to take the day off because you can’t connect from home. All our meetings have been postponed to Monday because of this crap.

      My whole family was off the grid. Can you imagine needing an ambulance but can’t even call 911? When I think of state cyberterrorism, this is the kind of scenario that comes to mind. The risk can’t be overstated.

      9 votes
    2. [3]
      Loire
      (edited )
      Link Parent
      Spoiler alert: It won't be. As you know Canada is a unique situation for telcom's because we are such a geographically large nation with significant gaps of nothing in between the population...

      We REALLY need to start doing something about the fucking Telco/ISP oligopoly here in Canada. Hopefully this will finally be the wake-up call needed for our politicians to actually do something about this crap

      Spoiler alert: It won't be.

      As you know Canada is a unique situation for telcom's because we are such a geographically large nation with significant gaps of nothing in between the population centers, even in the major provinces. To deploy a telecommunications network here for a new company is prohibitively expensive and time consuming.

      The former WIND CEO has spoken at length about this. It cost 600 million just to start WIND. An ADDITIONAL billion dollars to get a bare bones independent network off the ground in like four cities (GTA, Hamilton, and Calgary, Ottawa IIRC). Now your investors are in for 1.6 billion dollars with a minimal network to show for it. What if your Calgarian customer goes to Edmonton or Northern Alberta for work as is typical here? Why wouldn't they choose Telus for it's more complete coverage of Alberta. You're fighting an uphill battle for customers.

      The Feds HAVE been trying to broaden the Telco landscape since at least Harper. Ten years of trying and every smaller company (WIND, Shaw, MTS) eventually gets snapped up by the big three anyways. At this point all they could do is create a federal telecom which likely isn't something the government wants to dabble in (again prohibitively expensive).

      One way the Feds could help is to loosen laws concerning foreign capital investment into telcom's (something that hurt WIND). There just isn't enough investment capital in Canada to cover the billions required to build true competition. However that comes with security issues that the government isn't willing to risk.

      They could also take control of the wireless network, but, at this point, that will be itself prohibitively expensive. Finally the feds could enforce tower sharing in Canada (which Telus/Bell/Rogers are not required to do) to allow startups a shot at national coverage without needing to pony up the billions in front. This last option is the most realistic in my mind but I don't know if it would fix the outage situation that just occurred. If a startup is on the Rogers tower, would their network have gone down as well?

      8 votes
      1. [2]
        cfabbro
        (edited )
        Link Parent
        I unfortunately don’t have time to give your comment the attention it deserves right now (I’m on mobile and about to visit with my nephew for a few hours), but as some food for thought until I can...

        I unfortunately don’t have time to give your comment the attention it deserves right now (I’m on mobile and about to visit with my nephew for a few hours), but as some food for thought until I can reply with more a comprehensive comment addressing all the issues (I actually have a lot to say on this subject, if you’re interested in hearing me out):

        I think you’re being overly pessimistic. And the reason I think that is in part because Sasktel is a quite successful crown corp Telecom, despite Saskatchewan being the least densely populated province. So IMO there is no reason the same business model couldn’t be equally as successful in every other province too.

        7 votes
        1. Loire
          Link Parent
          I await your response but in the meantime concerning SaskTel: The company began in 1908. They have had over a century to build up their network progressively, especially when wireless expectations...

          I await your response but in the meantime concerning SaskTel:

          The company began in 1908. They have had over a century to build up their network progressively, especially when wireless expectations were lower in the 90's/00's. They aren't trying to kick-start a nation wide network in 2020 with customers expecting perfect coverage and uninterrupted service.

          Likewise their network is restricted to southern and Central Saskatchewan. They cover geographically half of the one province. While I understand most people don't move around as much as I do, anytime someone leaves that area, traveling within their own country, perhaps just next door to a neighbouring province, they need ab additional "noStrings" roaming plan. Within their own country!

          So while it's a good example for people who live exclusively in southern Saskatchewan and rarely leave it, it's not that different a model from what WIND accomplished.

          4 votes
    3. cfabbro
      Link Parent
      p.s. Wikipedia article on the event, in case anyone is interested in reading about how widespread the problem was: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2022_Rogers_Communications_outage

      p.s. Wikipedia article on the event, in case anyone is interested in reading about how widespread the problem was: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2022_Rogers_Communications_outage

      5 votes