23 votes

Flathub has now served more than two billion downloads for Flatpaks

7 comments

  1. [6]
    l_one
    Link
    There are a lot of programs I like and use on Flatpak, and for sure it is convenient, but damn it just hogs so much bandwidth for every update. I'm looking to switch away from it because of that...

    There are a lot of programs I like and use on Flatpak, and for sure it is convenient, but damn it just hogs so much bandwidth for every update. I'm looking to switch away from it because of that (I'm hitting my monthly bandwidth cap by having every flatpack update take up multiple GB individually).

    1 vote
    1. [5]
      SteeeveTheSteve
      Link Parent
      That's sort of a conundrum. Either deal with dependencies, which sometimes break apps by being too up-to-date, or live with large file sizes consuming most your bandwidth.

      That's sort of a conundrum. Either deal with dependencies, which sometimes break apps by being too up-to-date, or live with large file sizes consuming most your bandwidth.

      1 vote
      1. JXM
        Link Parent
        You're right. I think for most people the trade off is worth it. Most people have enough bandwidth and storage where it isn't a concern that flatpak apps are bigger than just a "regular" Linux...

        You're right. I think for most people the trade off is worth it. Most people have enough bandwidth and storage where it isn't a concern that flatpak apps are bigger than just a "regular" Linux program. Other package management options like yum and apt are available for people who are storage/bandwidth constrained. There's nothing wrong with using those.

        But for a large swath of users, the advantages of flatpak far outweigh the downsides. That's especially true for those new to Linux.

        2 votes
      2. [3]
        teaearlgraycold
        Link Parent
        I'm sure this isn't a trivial undertaking, but dependency management systems like the ones built for programming languages have solutions for this problem. You have a local repository of...

        I'm sure this isn't a trivial undertaking, but dependency management systems like the ones built for programming languages have solutions for this problem. You have a local repository of dependencies, including multiple different versions of dependencies and sub-dependencies where needed. Individual packages get linked to the versions they need, meaning one binary could end up including two copies of a library.

        We should be able to do this at runtime, building a container with symlinks to all of the packages required by the binary. Downloading an application would mean acquiring as little information as the target binary - or the binary and all dependencies if you have none of them yet.

        1. [2]
          fxgn
          Link Parent
          Well, that's basically almost how Flatpak works

          Well, that's basically almost how Flatpak works

          1 vote
          1. teaearlgraycold
            Link Parent
            So this isn't really a problem?

            So this isn't really a problem?

            or live with large file sizes consuming most your bandwidth