17 votes

Topic deleted by author

7 comments

  1. [5]
    Comment deleted by author
    Link
    1. [3]
      Comment deleted by author
      Link Parent
      1. [2]
        TheInvaderZim
        Link Parent
        Seems like simply checking to make sure that the companies werent storing/using that data would be all that was needed, here. So... Everyone is wrong, as usual?

        Seems like simply checking to make sure that the companies werent storing/using that data would be all that was needed, here. So... Everyone is wrong, as usual?

        1 vote
        1. jackson
          Link Parent
          Regardless, this is a violation of the API terms. It's like how Facebook's "research" app was using an Enterprise deployment certificate and had their certificates revoked because it was being...

          Regardless, this is a violation of the API terms. It's like how Facebook's "research" app was using an Enterprise deployment certificate and had their certificates revoked because it was being misused.

          If you're breaking the rules of a company, don't expect to be allowed to keep doing so. No reasonable businessman should operate under the assumption that they won't get caught breaking the rules.

          2 votes
    2. [2]
      NaraVara
      Link Parent
      I was about to say, the timing on this seems a lot closer to the Onavo Facebook thing than to the release of the Screen Time app. It seems like a weird oversight for the Times to completely blow...

      I was about to say, the timing on this seems a lot closer to the Onavo Facebook thing than to the release of the Screen Time app. It seems like a weird oversight for the Times to completely blow through that.

      But it also does point out how bad the developer relations is on the App Store. They’re the only game in town and feel no need to actually help people succeed on the platform. What exactly is that 30% cut of revenues for if they’re going to be this unhelpful?

      6 votes
      1. Greg
        Link Parent
        My experience of the App Store is that there are two completely different worlds. The standard channels reflect exactly what the article said: slow, opaque, and inconsistent canned responses that...

        My experience of the App Store is that there are two completely different worlds. The standard channels reflect exactly what the article said: slow, opaque, and inconsistent canned responses that are generally unhelpful and sometimes even make things worse.

        If, however, you're dealing with a named individual then they tend to be the absolute picture of service. The outreach and relations people we've met through conferences and industry events will go out of their way to set up real meetings as quickly as possible, help out and advise where they can, and generally get to the bottom of things if there's a problem.

        All that said, we've been on very good terms with Apple (and hopefully will continue to be), so my fear in a situation like the article describes would be that the direct contacts suddenly shut you out when the policy changes. If the dev relations team stops taking your calls right when the canned 30 day notification comes in, there's not a lot that can be done.

        4 votes
  2. [3]
    Deimos
    Link
    Apple released an official statement about this yesterday: The facts about parental control apps

    Apple released an official statement about this yesterday: The facts about parental control apps

    3 votes
    1. [2]
      NaraVara
      Link Parent
      Exactly what I suspected their rationale was. I'm really disappointed in the Times for, apparently, not getting a statement from Apple for their article to this effect. It seems very obvious and...

      Exactly what I suspected their rationale was. I'm really disappointed in the Times for, apparently, not getting a statement from Apple for their article to this effect. It seems very obvious and clear and I think Apple is in the right on this one.

      4 votes
      1. emdash
        Link Parent
        Apple isn't always a perfect company by any means, but they certainly take a lot of accusatory bullshit in the name of journalism clicks quite frequently. A lot of Louis Rossmann's content is just...

        Apple isn't always a perfect company by any means, but they certainly take a lot of accusatory bullshit in the name of journalism clicks quite frequently.

        A lot of Louis Rossmann's content is just outrage-filler with no basis in sensibility too. Like the time he made a whole rant about Apple having the ability to spy on its users with Mac webcams when he's smart enough to know that the circuitry clearly indicates that the LED light next to the Webcam cannot be off while the webcam is on, and the fact he confused "4GB" with "4Gb".

        Or the time he had an Apple battery supplier produce batteries for him with Apple's IP, then claiming Apple took his batteries.

        Or when Bloomberg published their Chinese chip scandal story, stating that Chinese spyware chips had infiltrated Apple & their partners.

        There's so much nonsensical BS out there, and Apple, a historically quiet company, obviously doesn't release their official say that frequently. But when they do, they often provide irrefutable evidence that the latest tech-journalist clickbait outrage cycle is just more over-hyped idiocy.