12 votes

All Tridactyl installations might get removed by Firefox on Aug 21

10 comments

  1. [10]
    unknown user
    Link
    Sad. Firefox is not really a browser for the hacker-minded anymore. I get that, they are competing with "those guys", just like Ubuntu or elementaryOS do, so these compromises where they side with...

    Sad. Firefox is not really a browser for the hacker-minded anymore. I get that, they are competing with "those guys", just like Ubuntu or elementaryOS do, so these compromises where they side with the casual user who make up the majority of their users are understandable if I empathise with them.

    I'd jump ship from Firefox ASAP if I found a browser where I could replicate my experience with the many addons I use (uBlock Origin, Stylus, GreasyMonkey, Zotero, Language Switcher, DecentralEyes, Instapaper) plus Firefox Sync w/ my phone. Back some years ago I loved Xombrero, but they did not port over to the new Webkit 2. Qutebrowser was nice but I missed my addons plus there were some issues like some changes in the page state not being in sync with what commands act on / do. I am keeping an eye on Next but it is not there yet and it too won't have the addons.

    3 votes
    1. [5]
      hungariantoast
      Link Parent
      qutebrowser has an issue open for adding a Python API for plugins. Personally, that has me pretty excited. I've been wanting to just jump ship to a minimal browser like Next, surf, or qutebrowser...

      qutebrowser has an issue open for adding a Python API for plugins.

      Personally, that has me pretty excited.

      I've been wanting to just jump ship to a minimal browser like Next, surf, or qutebrowser for a long time, but like most people, extensions are the thing that keeps me stuck on Firefox. I really need to just quit using Firefox, drop it hard, cold turkey, for a week or so, and see how difficult the adjustment is. Maybe I'll find it easier than expected?

      Either way, my browsing habits would probably be a lot healthier if I switched to a minimal browser.

      4 votes
      1. [4]
        Deimos
        Link Parent
        First two paragraphs are a copy-paste of a comment I made about qutebrowser on HN yesterday: The adblocking/script-blocking capabilities (described in #9 and #10 in their FAQ) are extremely weak...

        First two paragraphs are a copy-paste of a comment I made about qutebrowser on HN yesterday:

        The adblocking/script-blocking capabilities (described in #9 and #10 in their FAQ) are extremely weak and inconvenient (and their claim about the negative impact of adblocking is outright false).

        Those are probably the two most important capabilities for browser security, so the lack of them definitely means I'd never want to use it for general browsing. I'd much rather deal with weaker keybinds than sacrifice that much on the security and privacy side.

        Adding a plugin API would definitely be good, but it still means all the extensions will need to be re-developed for qute, and they're unlikely to ever get anywhere close to the functionality of the ones being maintained for major browsers.

        What do you think about a minimal browser would make your browsing healthier?

        6 votes
        1. [3]
          hungariantoast
          (edited )
          Link Parent
          The shortest summary I can give as an answer to your question would be: "I think it would help me waste less time than I currently do." Not because I couldn't "optimize" my time spent browsing the...

          The shortest summary I can give as an answer to your question would be: "I think it would help me waste less time than I currently do."

          Not because I couldn't "optimize" my time spent browsing the web on Firefox to be less wasteful, but because I think the experience of using a minimal browser, or at least, using surf, would be so restricting that I would have to change the way I interact with the web entirely.

          So like, surf has no tabs (unless you patch it) as well as no ad blocking. I feel like only having one tab would force me to optimize how much time I spend on a single page. If I have five posts I want to check out on Lobsters and maybe post to Tildes (like I just finished doing), I'm forced into only being able to focus on one page at a time. Strangely enough, I think knowing there's another page out there that I need to get to would actually make me much stricter in my evaluation of what content I deem "worth my time". So if post A on Lobsters is kind of a dud, I might scamper off to post B sooner than I would on Firefox, since post B isn't sitting safely in another tab and there's a chance I might forget about it or even (rarely) lose access to it. The lack of adblocking would also put a much tighter restriction on the number of websites I'd be willing to visit. It would also force me to look more carefully into other content blocking solutions I'm using, like my Pi-hole, but that's a whole other can of worms.

          And don't get me wrong, I'm sure I could browse in a healthier way just fine with Firefox, but there's still that allure of the suckless meme minimalism.

          Which, if I'm being honest, was the "minimal browser" I had in mind when I wrote that bit in the other comment.

          In a very weird, abstract way, I feel like forcing myself into a more minimal, constrained, and narrowed browsing experience would actually help me detach from most of the web entirely. Instead of this massive, full featured browser, I would have this little, weird utility that does only a handful of things.

          Finally, just as a little bit of anecdotal evidence, I noticed some time ago that, when browsing reddit with my mobile app of choice, I was much more focused and stayed on track better when using that app's built in browser functionality, which didn't allow tabs or a forward button.

          Yeah, I hope some of that made sense. It's not necessarily Firefox that's the problem, as much as it is that I feel like forcing myself into a constrained experience would serve me better than trusting myself not to take advantage of features right in front of me.

          Unfortunately though, privacy and security would suffer compared to using something like Firefox it seems, which challenges my definition of "healthy".

          I really need to just set a date and try out surf, Next, or qutebrowser for a week though and see how I get along.

          4 votes
    2. [4]
      annadane
      Link Parent
      Waterfox?

      Waterfox?

      2 votes
      1. [3]
        unknown user
        Link Parent
        I can't gather how this is different from something like Pale Moon. Is this maintaining XUL and XPCOM alongside WebExtensions, or is it a binary choice? If I'm staying on Firefox or something...

        I can't gather how this is different from something like Pale Moon. Is this maintaining XUL and XPCOM alongside WebExtensions, or is it a binary choice? If I'm staying on Firefox or something forked off of it, I'd rather prefer having access to new features and security patches to FF mainstream.

        3 votes
        1. Elronnd
          Link Parent
          It implements webextensions and contains FF updates.

          It implements webextensions and contains FF updates.

          2 votes
        2. mftrhu
          Link Parent
          At the very least, PaleMoon was forked from Firefox 38 ESR, and it maintains its own fork of Gecko, Goanna. Waterfox seems to be moving more closely behind Firefox, as their codebase is newer (I...

          At the very least, PaleMoon was forked from Firefox 38 ESR, and it maintains its own fork of Gecko, Goanna. Waterfox seems to be moving more closely behind Firefox, as their codebase is newer (I think they forked it from FF 56?)

          1 vote