5 votes

11 Things Computer Users Will Never Experience Again (2015)

8 comments

  1. [8]
    cfabbro
    (edited )
    Link
    Is there any way to read this in a one page format, @asteroid? I was playing around, and setting ?image_number to 0 is the closest I could find, but it's missing the page 1 text. p.s. While the...

    Is there any way to read this in a one page format, @asteroid? I was playing around, and setting ?image_number to 0 is the closest I could find, but it's missing the page 1 text.

    p.s. While the general consumer market has certainly trended towards all-in-one/prebuilts/microcomputers/etc and things will likely continue to go in that direction, so this article will probably get more and more true for most people over time... I still think there will always be a niche for desktop PC builders who will still get to experience most of these things. I have been building my own computers since I was a wee youngin', my latest mini-itx just last year, and fully intend to teach my nephew how to do it eventually as well, since he has shown an interest in gaming and loves my now completely over-the-top setup. The PC building tradition will live on! ;)

    6 votes
    1. [5]
      the_walrus
      (edited )
      Link Parent
      I had the same thought. This article should have been titled, "11 Things Computer Users Will Never Have To Experience Again." None of the things the author listed are commonplace anymore, but...

      I had the same thought. This article should have been titled, "11 Things Computer Users Will Never Have To Experience Again." None of the things the author listed are commonplace anymore, but there were certainly a lot of things she talked about that a user still has to deal with when building a computer.

      Edit: Fixed pronoun for author.

      6 votes
      1. [2]
        aphoenix
        Link Parent
        Moreover, they are things that some people never had to deal with. The first computer that my parents bought came preassembled, and we didn't have to know anything about putting it together. It's...

        Moreover, they are things that some people never had to deal with. The first computer that my parents bought came preassembled, and we didn't have to know anything about putting it together.

        It's always been possible to have a computer and not know how to build a computer.

        4 votes
        1. onyxleopard
          Link Parent
          At the very, very beginning, consumer-grade personal computers were only available as kits that you had to assemble yourself (same with radios). The kit-makers very quickly started making...

          At the very, very beginning, consumer-grade personal computers were only available as kits that you had to assemble yourself (same with radios). The kit-makers very quickly started making pre-built systems, though, because the market for DIY computers was very small.

          2 votes
    2. onyxleopard
      Link Parent
      The structure of this website and lack of adherence to best-practices for HTML and the semantic web are the exact kind of thing that users shouldn’t have to deal with. If you want to paginate your...

      Is there any way to read this in a one page format, @asteroid? I was playing around, and setting ?image_number to 0 is the closest I could find, but it's missing the page 1 text.

      The structure of this website and lack of adherence to best-practices for HTML and the semantic web are the exact kind of thing that users shouldn’t have to deal with. If you want to paginate your document, that’s fine. I feel like it’s an enormous oversight of HTML/CSS/javascript that there isn’t a standard for implementing pagination that allows for transparency, machine readability, human readability, and the affordance of lazy, on-scroll loading. I’ve seen hundreds of implementations of this, and most of them are bad from a UX perspective. Sure, there are best practices [1, 2], but this feels like a fundamental feature of websites that seems to be reinvented in a bespoke fashion for every site.

      Humans don’t want to fight against computers. If you intend humans to use computers (or read web pages), you need to do the work to make that experience one that is inviting. Most humans are not computer hobbyists (or HTML/javascript parsers), so maybe it’s a good idea to treat them that way?

      4 votes