14 votes

Ring watched your kids trick or treat and then bragged about it

15 comments

  1. [10]
    retiredrugger
    Link
    I'll never understand how people don't find this deeply disturbing.

    I'll never understand how people don't find this deeply disturbing.

    13 votes
    1. [9]
      Seven
      Link Parent
      I mean it's a security camera, it's kind of its job to be always watching. It's wrong that the videos were shared without the consent of the people in them, but I don't find this "deeply disturbing."

      I mean it's a security camera, it's kind of its job to be always watching. It's wrong that the videos were shared without the consent of the people in them, but I don't find this "deeply disturbing."

      6 votes
      1. [8]
        determinism
        Link Parent
        Security cameras capture video feeds, people watch them. The question is who gets to watch them? I can watch my own security camera, I can watch the ones that neighbors share through this service....

        Security cameras capture video feeds, people watch them. The question is who gets to watch them? I can watch my own security camera, I can watch the ones that neighbors share through this service. The owners of the service can watch all of them. This is what is deeply disturbing, more power asymmetries to pile up against the individual.

        14 votes
        1. [7]
          Seven
          Link Parent
          Can they watch all of them? It seems to me that the owners of the service can only watch those videos that are shared on the Neighbors app, not just all recorded videos. I would say that if...

          Can they watch all of them? It seems to me that the owners of the service can only watch those videos that are shared on the Neighbors app, not just all recorded videos. I would say that if someone is openly sharing their own recorded video, then it is not the company's fault for viewing them. For sharing them without the consent of those recorded, however, is a different matter entirely.

          2 votes
          1. [2]
            determinism
            Link Parent
            The Neighbors App has a radius for normal users. A larger radius for police precincts. An all-encompasing "radius" for Ring/Amazon.

            The Neighbors App has a radius for normal users. A larger radius for police precincts. An all-encompasing "radius" for Ring/Amazon.

            5 votes
            1. Seven
              Link Parent
              Personally, I kind of expect that. If you share something on social media at all, even with privacy settings, I don't think it's too unreasonable that the owners of the service have access to it....

              Personally, I kind of expect that. If you share something on social media at all, even with privacy settings, I don't think it's too unreasonable that the owners of the service have access to it. I understand how others could be uncomfortable with that, but when I share something on social media, I expect that the owners of the site can see it. Perhaps it's just the way I view social media, though.

              2 votes
          2. [4]
            retiredrugger
            Link Parent
            I'm having difficulty gauging their definition of "shared" through this post. I don't have a Ring so I won't pretend to fully know how the process works but the article's wording implies two...

            The videos featured in those ads were "shared," most likely to the Neighbors app. When you "share" content, you grant Amazon a blanket license to use any and all footage captured on Ring devices for whatever it want

            I'm having difficulty gauging their definition of "shared" through this post. I don't have a Ring so I won't pretend to fully know how the process works but the article's wording implies two things:

            *Ring automatically has access to any footage you share from the camera to the app
            *It seems once you "share" content one time they have access to all content henceforth.

            4 votes
            1. [3]
              Seven
              Link Parent
              This phrasing is definitely concerning. If by sharing one clip to the service, Ring/Amazon automatically gains access to all footage recorded by the device, that is certainly a breach of privacy....

              This phrasing is definitely concerning. If by sharing one clip to the service, Ring/Amazon automatically gains access to all footage recorded by the device, that is certainly a breach of privacy. I don't really have a problem with them being able to access shared footage, but if they have access to all content, the license definitely needs to change to make sure that Amazon can only access the shared content on the app. (Of course, it would be ideal if they had no access at all, but I feel like that is too much to hope for.)

              4 votes
              1. [2]
                Diff
                Link Parent
                Odds are they always have access to all footage. They only used footage shared on the Neighbors app to quickly find stuff that was actually worth sharing, and used the additional terms and...

                Odds are they always have access to all footage. They only used footage shared on the Neighbors app to quickly find stuff that was actually worth sharing, and used the additional terms and conditions to protect them while they made a slideshow out of it.

                1 vote
                1. Seven
                  Link Parent
                  It is likely that they do already have access, but I don't really want to make a judgement yet based on "odds are".

                  It is likely that they do already have access, but I don't really want to make a judgement yet based on "odds are".

                  1 vote
  2. [4]
    Shahriar
    Link
    Headline from Mashable is portraying a sinister mass surveillance involvement, doesn't appear to be the case.

    The videos featured in those ads were "shared," most likely to the Neighbors app. When you "share" content, you grant Amazon a blanket license to use any and all footage captured on Ring devices for whatever it wants: "The company is able to do this thanks to a broad terms of service agreement that grants it the perpetual right to use footage shared with it for 'any purpose' it chooses," BuzzFeed wrote.

    Headline from Mashable is portraying a sinister mass surveillance involvement, doesn't appear to be the case.

    4 votes
    1. [2]
      Spel
      (edited )
      Link Parent
      It’s the people with the cameras that share it. The people being watched have no say in it.

      It’s the people with the cameras that share it. The people being watched have no say in it.

      7 votes
      1. Lawrencium265
        Link Parent
        This right here, yes, you don't have a 'reasonable expectation of privacy' when you walk up to someone else's door, but that doesn't give them the right to use or share your likeness to promote...

        This right here, yes, you don't have a 'reasonable expectation of privacy' when you walk up to someone else's door, but that doesn't give them the right to use or share your likeness to promote their product.

        7 votes
    2. The_Thurmanator
      Link Parent
      Because things are always what they appear to be?

      Because things are always what they appear to be?

  3. ggfurasta
    Link
    Honest headline: Ring posted funny and cheerful trick or treating videos that owners shared online This is how to make a news story from literally nothing.

    Honest headline: Ring posted funny and cheerful trick or treating videos that owners shared online

    This is how to make a news story from literally nothing.