13 votes

No engineer has ever sued a company because of constructive post-interview feedback. So why don’t employers do it?

8 comments

  1. [4]
    ffmike
    Link
    I went through a job hunt (software developer/manager) last year, and this isn't unique (in my experience) to post-interview feedback. At every step of the way, starting with first applications,...

    I went through a job hunt (software developer/manager) last year, and this isn't unique (in my experience) to post-interview feedback. At every step of the way, starting with first applications, at least 50% of companies don't bother to respond at all.

    Now, this could be that I'm a poor candidate (I'm already getting hit with age discrimination, but that's another story), but I suspect more likely it just reflects the fact that high-tech hiring is a buyer's market. There are fewer good jobs out there than there are people hunting them. With an increase in "bootcamp" training, and an increasing number of failed IPOs and VC-backed implosions, that's going to get worse, not better.

    7 votes
    1. [2]
      Omnicrola
      Link Parent
      Come on out here to Michigan, you'll have a developer job so fast it'll make your head spin. Especially if you've got some years of experience. Ford, for example, cannot hire people fast enough....

      There are fewer good jobs out there than there are people hunting them.

      Come on out here to Michigan, you'll have a developer job so fast it'll make your head spin. Especially if you've got some years of experience. Ford, for example, cannot hire people fast enough. Several other places around that are all growing fast and are competing for people.

      5 votes
      1. joplin
        Link Parent
        Some additional anecdata - A friend of mine in Detroit just left one tech job and got another one within a few months. He took some time to visit with friends and family and take some classes...

        Some additional anecdata - A friend of mine in Detroit just left one tech job and got another one within a few months. He took some time to visit with friends and family and take some classes during his downtime. He probably could have found one faster if he had needed to.

        2 votes
    2. Micycle_the_Bichael
      Link Parent
      I think this really has more to do with where you live. I know parts of the midwest are begging for tech people to come fill positions. Not that that's very helpful information if you don't live...

      I think this really has more to do with where you live. I know parts of the midwest are begging for tech people to come fill positions. Not that that's very helpful information if you don't live there or aren't looking to move.

      3 votes
  2. [4]
    ffmike
    Link
    Actually, I'm in the Midwest (Evansville). But (a) I am only interested in full-remote positions and (b) I won't work for industries I disapprove of. So that limits my choices a bit. Still, my...

    Actually, I'm in the Midwest (Evansville). But (a) I am only interested in full-remote positions and (b) I won't work for industries I disapprove of. So that limits my choices a bit.

    Still, my experience is consistent with that of quite a number of other fairly senior developers I've worked with at midsize (100-500 people) companies: finding that next job is tough, and getting tougher.

    I do bear in mind that there is a difference between "anecdote" and "data" though. YMMV.

    1 vote
    1. [3]
      teaearlgraycold
      Link Parent
      Just curious, why are you only interested in remote positions? I can understand being open to them as it gives you more options while not requiring a move. But you wouldn't take a good opportunity...

      Just curious, why are you only interested in remote positions? I can understand being open to them as it gives you more options while not requiring a move. But you wouldn't take a good opportunity if it was in commuting distance?

      2 votes
      1. reese
        Link Parent
        I live somewhere with a population roughly an order of magnitude greater than that of Evansville, and there are dismally few good opportunities here. As in, like, a couple I could maybe tolerate....

        I live somewhere with a population roughly an order of magnitude greater than that of Evansville, and there are dismally few good opportunities here.

        As in, like, a couple I could maybe tolerate. I'd rather not do twenty-year-old Java for the crumbling rail company. The major health insurance companies here pay well and have okay tech stacks, but 1) they shouldn't exist, 2) everyone has already established their esoteric and impenetrable ivory towers of financial security, and 3) their insurance benefits are notoriously bad, lol. And nope, also not interested in that consulting company where people get sexually harassed all the time either.

        And "good" is relative to everything else available here, by the way. Now, I like this area, and I could give a shit less about local "opportunities" since I work from home, but my wife, on the other hand, will likely need us to move for a job change soon. We're talking several hours of a drive away, at least. Super excited to move all of our cats and furniture.... but being able to move at all is a privilege I recognize and cherish.

        As far as Evansville goes (and I used to live near there for a long time), the closest metropolitan areas are Louisville and Nashville, which are over a couple hours away. So basically, as far as the person you were responding to goes, Evansville is probably it for the foreseeable future. The alternative is moving, which is always complicated for us all. I eventually escaped the Midwest with a tremendous amount of luck and effort, but abandoning all my friends and family has taken its toll.

        Point being, truly good local opportunities are probably pretty sparse for most people.

        6 votes
      2. ffmike
        Link Parent
        I've been working entirely remote for over 20 years now. I've become quite comfortable with the lifestyle that enables - among other things it's let me homeschool my kids while holding down...

        I've been working entirely remote for over 20 years now. I've become quite comfortable with the lifestyle that enables - among other things it's let me homeschool my kids while holding down full-time jobs. So no, I don't really see any circumstance that would get me to take an office job at this point, commuting distance or not.

        3 votes