10 votes

Nearly two years after Europe's GDPR privacy law came into effect, supporters are frustrated by lack of enforcement, poor funding, limited staff resources and stalling tactics by the tech companies

2 comments

  1. ThatFanficGuy
    Link
    Nevermind the GIGANTIC, ENORMOUS banners asking you to agree to the very same terms you've been unwittingly subject to before, most often without the ability to opt out or manage which cookies...

    Nevermind the GIGANTIC, ENORMOUS banners asking you to agree to the very same terms you've been unwittingly subject to before, most often without the ability to opt out or manage which cookies you're allowing in...

    4 votes
  2. ohyran
    Link
    I mean I know what the GDPR is, but like most here (in the tinier EU countries who just gets to watch what the Europeans do in the EU) its sort of confusing why its there? It seems technically...

    I mean I know what the GDPR is, but like most here (in the tinier EU countries who just gets to watch what the Europeans do in the EU) its sort of confusing why its there? It seems technically complex, strangely or overly defined and without much support.

    I just did an interview at our city library and even that ment I had to sign a GDPR waiver as it was recorded and uploaded (or would be). Just like we all online (click accept as fast as possible) everyone involved just sighed and signed.
    Wish it would just go away, what was before was in practice more private even if it wasn't legally.