12 votes

Confessions of a Trump troll - A Georgia lawyer describes how he used twenty fake Twitter accounts to disseminate political disinformation

2 comments

  1. dubteedub
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    I think the New Yorker is doing an incredible disservice by framing this as just simple trolling rather than a concerted push to spread misinformation, sow chaos, and interfere with our elections...

    I think the New Yorker is doing an incredible disservice by framing this as just simple trolling rather than a concerted push to spread misinformation, sow chaos, and interfere with our elections process.

    Out of curiosity, he attended a far-right gathering, where he found the younger attendees to be “maybe a little misguided, but well intended.” He began creating fake Twitter accounts, he said, to see “whether I could get more interactions, more retweets, by being a little more radical.” The Confederate flag was often his avatar, or the Bonnie Blue, a lesser-known Confederate banner. For his handles, he made up acronyms with a nationalistic tinge, such as FFK: Faith Folk and Kin. He fashioned the accounts’ ersatz users as boomers or gun-rights activists. The latter, he said, were easy: “Just follow Dana Loesch and interact with those crazy girls who stay up all night tweeting Second Amendment stuff.” He added, “I’d get them to retweet me and then my following would blow up.” By the time the 2016 race was under way, he had about twenty accounts, each with a few thousand followers. His fake alt-right accounts amplified Trump’s messaging and distorted Hillary Clinton’s. (“Something about her makes me nervous,” he said.) His fake Antifa ones spread what he called “disinformation and false stories” to benefit Trump.

    It seems pretty clear to me that this guy is not just LARPing as a white nationalist on Twitter, but sincerely believes in the cause. I am really disappointed that the New Yorker let this guy be anonymous and didn't out him for the racist chaos agent that he gleefully expresses that he is.

    20 votes
  2. dblohm7
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    Sadly some of my old high school pals are into this stuff. They just see it as one big joke. The stakes are irrelevant to them. From that friend group, those of us who have actually grown up have...

    Sadly some of my old high school pals are into this stuff. They just see it as one big joke. The stakes are irrelevant to them.

    From that friend group, those of us who have actually grown up have tried to talk some sense into them without success.

    9 votes