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Apple's M1: Cinebench scores released

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  1. tindall
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    The M1 places between the 45W i7-10850H and the 65W i7-10400 on the blue team, both capable of hyperthreading, providing 16 PCI-e lanes, and controlling a comparatively vast 128GB of DDR4. It...

    The M1 places between the 45W i7-10850H and the 65W i7-10400 on the blue team, both capable of hyperthreading, providing 16 PCI-e lanes, and controlling a comparatively vast 128GB of DDR4. It should also be noted that in single core performance, the M1 is beaten by the i7-1165G7, a 15W laptop part with, again, vastly more memory control capability and more PCI-e lanes, and that, especially for laptop parts, thermal design power is not the same as power draw - Intel's aggressive P-states in the 10 series are very effective in reducing power usage.

    On the AMD side, the part places between the Ryzen 2 2600 and 2600X - however, I think this is not the time to evaluate the M1's performance against Ryzen, since new Ryzen CPUs with dramatically improved silicon are just now coming onto the market, making this a somewhat apples-to-oranges (ha ha) comparison.

    This is quite interesting to me in terms of the evolution of Apple processors, and CPUs in general.
    They've clearly built a great 15W CPU with acceptable performance per dollar and excellent performance per Watt, but some of the details make me think they'll have issues scaling up.

    For one, while I don't expect their thermal overhead to more than double in this generation, they support only 16GB of memory and no hardware encoding for a number of codecs. This makes the part a non-starter for a lot of users in 3D animation, video editing, software development, CAD, etc, even forgetting the overhead from using proprietary x86 software under Rosetta 2. Of course, it's a low-end part, but if omitting lots of silicon - including high-power silicon in the memory controller - is how they hit such a low TDP, they're going to have a hell of a time scaling up to a professional-grade part. Indeed, there are even AMD laptops out there with a heck of a lot more "oomph per Watt", not to mention per dollar, for some users, especially those doing video encoding or running VMs on the daily, and that will only become more true as the new Ryzen parts make their way into the laptop market.

    In a certain sense, of course, none of this matters, because the part is Apple-only and nobody will ever get the opportunity to run anything but Mac OS on it in a serious capacity, and soon nobody running modern Mac OS will have the opportunity to use the competition's chips.

    7 votes