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  • Showing only topics with the tag "reddit". Back to normal view
    1. Reddit custom logos nostalgia

      Right now there's a little doodle for the reddit logo to congratulate UVA on winning the NCAA tournament last night and it really brought me back to the days when this was common. Fun times. Of...

      Right now there's a little doodle for the reddit logo to congratulate UVA on winning the NCAA tournament last night and it really brought me back to the days when this was common. Fun times. Of course you can't see it from the redesign, fittingly.

      You can see a catalog of every one there's been at r/logo.

      11 votes
    2. What are your thoughts on Reddit's r/movies subreddit ?

      Personally, I strongly dislike it. Every aspect of every film is way overblown there. If there's a funny scene in a movie, they LITERALLY die laughing and wake their whole neighbourhood up. If...

      Personally, I strongly dislike it. Every aspect of every film is way overblown there.

      If there's a funny scene in a movie, they LITERALLY die laughing and wake their whole neighbourhood up.

      If there's a scene that is in the slightest bit sad, they're going to cry their eyes out for months.

      If there's a movie that's decently good, then it's an absolute masterpiece and the best movie of the decade.

      And so on... Everything is always really exaggerated.

      On top of that, there's always the circlejerk hivemind aspect. Threads are closed after 6 months, so the whole discussion about the film is divided between many threads, but because every thread is small and new, you often get the same fluff comments.

      For more popular flims, it is the absolute worst. With half the thread being just funny quotes from the movie with no additional commentary or anything valuable, yet having thousands upon thousands of upvotes. It's kind of sad.

      I used to go to IMDb boards, –which, admittedly, had their own issues– but they were still pretty useful for discussion. And shutting people up wasn't as easy as it is on Reddit, so the opinions there were much more varied. However, since they shut them down, Reddit is the closest thing I've found. Moviechat.org is supposed to be a replacement to the IMDb boards, but it's pretty inactive.

      So, even though I kind of despise r/movies, I'm sort of forced to use them. But reading it makes me somewhat bitter.

      What about you?

      13 votes
    3. There's now a "News" section on new.reddit.com

      Link: https://new.reddit.com/news (only available on redesign). I quickly searched for anything announcing this on Reddit, but didn't find anything. Seems there was an iOS beta a few months back...

      Link: https://new.reddit.com/news (only available on redesign).

      I quickly searched for anything announcing this on Reddit, but didn't find anything. Seems there was an iOS beta a few months back and I guess now they've fully rolled it out. Thoughts? Personally I can't see myself using it.

      22 votes
    4. The Rise of Reddit's Megathreads

      I originally posted this as a comment here but thought it might deserve it's own discussion. I think that the rise of megathreads/ultrathreads/collections of threads on reddit has been a large...

      I originally posted this as a comment here but thought it might deserve it's own discussion.

      I think that the rise of megathreads/ultrathreads/collections of threads on reddit has been a large detriment to the site.

      I'm a mod for a few large subreddits that utilizes them (and I know a good portion of people reading Tildes right now are as well), and as time goes on I've started to dislike them more and more.

      At first they were great - they seemed to silo off all the posts and noise that happened around an event, and made the lives of mods easier. Posts that should've been comments could now be removed, and the user could be pointed towards the megathread. Users could go back to the post and sort by new to see new posts, and know that they'd all have to do with that one topic.

      I believe that this silo actually hurts the community, and especially the discussion around that original megathread, more than it helps. As modteams I think we underestimate the resilience of our communities, and their ability to put up with "noise" around an event.

      The fact that we are in a subreddit dedicated to that cause should be silo enough - each post in that subreddit should be treated as an "atomic" piece of information, with the comments being branches. By relegating all conversation to a megathread we turn top level comments into that atomic piece of information, and subcomments into the branches.

      But that's just a poor implementation of the original! There are some edge cases where this might make sense (take /r/politics, it wouldn't make sense to have 9 of the top 10 posts just be slightly reworded posts on the same issues), but I think this can be remedied by better duplication rules (consider all posts on a certain topic to be a repost, unless the new post has new or different information).

      There is something to be said about the ability to generate a new, blank sheet of conversation with a post, that is not marred with previous information or anecdotes. New comments on a megathread post don't have that luxury, but new posts do.

      Additionally, I feel like the way reddit originally conditioned us to view posts is to view them then not check them again (unless we interacted with someone in it or got a notification). This prevents potentially great (but late) content from gaining visibility, as a non-negligible portion of the population will still be browsing the subreddit, but will never click the post again.

      24 votes
    5. A quick look at reddit load times on my (crappy) home internet connection.

      I decided to take a second look at the reddit redesign out of curiosity, and the lack of responsiveness was jarring. I found myself waiting several seconds just for a click to properly register....

      I decided to take a second look at the reddit redesign out of curiosity, and the lack of responsiveness was jarring. I found myself waiting several seconds just for a click to properly register. So I decided to take a look at the actual numbers for a bit of fun. Here are the results as reported by the Firefox network tab:

      Redesign

      13.88 MB / 7.23 MB transferred
      Finish: 57.46 s
      DOMContentLoaded: 1.92 s
      load: 25.67 s
      

      Old

      1.91 MB / 631.45 KB transferred
      Finish: 1.06 min
      DOMContentLoaded: 3.23 s
      load: 3.97 s
      

      And just for the sake of comparison:

      ~

      358.34 KB / 110.39 KB transferred
      Finish: 1.48 s
      DOMContentLoaded: 1.34 s
      load: 1.51 s
      
      28 votes