7 votes

As one of the world’s most unequal cities, why aren’t Hong Kong protesters angry at the rich and powerful?

1 comment

  1. Loire
    Link
    This reads very much like subtle government apologia through whataboutism. The overarching cause has been pretty well explained. Totalitarian government overreach into a community outside of the...

    This reads very much like subtle government apologia through whataboutism.

    There have been many explanations for the turmoil in Hong Kong, which is now heading toward its 16th weekend. However, the powerful links between the economic and political elites in the city and the grossly inadequate system of governance they preside over are too often ignored

    The overarching cause has been pretty well explained. Totalitarian government overreach into a community outside of the Chinese tradition, that even while under government control has become used to their special status, restricting party control.

    However, the most likely explanation for the unrest lies not in the education curriculum or Beijing’s influence over the city, but rather the nature of Hong Kong government and society itself.

    Of course. The cause of the protests is not the actual cause. How silly.

    the city has actually been in decay for decades.

    Two decades perhaps? Maybe since 1999 for example?

    And the protesters don’t condemn the government for protecting the elite’s economic interests to the exclusion of many Hong Kongers, but rather for implementing the will of Beijing.

    Perhaps because they are, reasonably focused, in the short term, on the government forces attempting to violently assert dominance over them?

    Crucially, too, little effort has been made to explain why universal suffrage would be so important in Hong Kong beyond thwarting China’s influence.

    Is universal suffrage not good enough reason in itself, especially in a city that has long existed within the traditional of western liberal democracy?

    The fact that young people are grappling with forging a more positive future is to be admired. However, for Hong Kong to have any reasonable future, the city requires nothing short of large-scale economic and political transformation.

    That may be difficult to accomplish when the government works to maintain the status quo of the oligarchs that conform to party policy. You know, the same government being protested?

    10 votes