CALICO's recent activity

  1. Comment on The War on Consciousness (controversial TEDx talk) in ~misc

    CALICO Link Parent
    I'd suggest further reading, because this has been addressed. A physicist from University of California has a proposal which would avoid that very thing. Yeah, it's controversial. Yeah, it's hard...

    It's highly unlikely that the brain could support the quantum states Penrose requires without extremely rapid decoherence.

    I'd suggest further reading, because this has been addressed. A physicist from University of California has a proposal which would avoid that very thing.

    Yeah, it's controversial. Yeah, it's hard to swallow.
    But I think you'll find upon reading deep into the literature that the Orch OR idea at least justifies its own existence. I don't suggest that anyone and everyone should be so swayed to immediately jump into acceptance.

    2 votes
  2. Comment on Fitness tracker recommendations? in ~health

    CALICO Link Parent
    I've been rocking a Fitbit Versa for about a year. I mostly use it for sleep tracking, unmapped runs, and as a soft alarm (vibrates). Also, it's a watch. Just not just very sexy compared to...

    I've been rocking a Fitbit Versa for about a year. I mostly use it for sleep tracking, unmapped runs, and as a soft alarm (vibrates). Also, it's a watch. Just not just very sexy compared to something steel.

    I was hoping there'd be some more esoteric details

    It's really handy being able to store songs right on the device to sync with bluetooth headphones, and I can put stupid gifs on it as a custom watchface which tickles me endlessly. Battery last me several days still, and I don't really have any complaints.

    It does what I want it to do.
    ★★★★★

    2 votes
  3. Comment on Bernie Sanders Unveils $16 Trillion ‘Green New Deal’ Plan in ~news

  4. Comment on The War on Consciousness (controversial TEDx talk) in ~misc

    CALICO Link Parent
    I don't think we disagree. Whether consciousness is entirely computation, involves quantum mechanics, or is akin to the relationship between my radio and the local station, the brain is...

    I don't think we disagree. Whether consciousness is entirely computation, involves quantum mechanics, or is akin to the relationship between my radio and the local station, the brain is fundamentally involved to a high degree. I doubt many people would disagree with it, even Mr. Hancock—who I enjoy very much, but this is one of the things he talks about that I think he goes too far—although I've had arguments in the past on reddit with people who didn't believe they themselves were conscious.

    The prevailing opinion in science, so far as I can tell, is that consciousness is an emergent phenomenon coming from the sufficiently complex organization of neurons and their computational capacity. That might be true. The problem with that idea, for me, is that the cerebellum is similarly complex and interconnected but appears to be entirely unconscious; it seems to be purely computational in nature. Until neurophysiology advances to a sufficiently more advanced level to explain why parts of the brain are either conscious or unconscious I will have problems with the idea.

    The Orch OR idea does it for me, for now. Until it's falsified, or the more common view is vindicated, or something entirely new comes along which takes the day.

    3 votes
  5. Comment on The War on Consciousness (controversial TEDx talk) in ~misc

    CALICO Link Parent
    We don't have any evidence for where consciousness comes from at all. Our understanding of the brain is at a preschool level, and that might be generous. That isn't to say that's a reason in and...

    If the TV signal paradigm is possible, why don't we have any observable evidence for it?

    We don't have any evidence for where consciousness comes from at all. Our understanding of the brain is at a preschool level, and that might be generous. That isn't to say that's a reason in and of itself to believe in it, but we don't know enough yet to discount it entirely either.

    Mathematical Physicist Sir Roger Penrose & Anesthesiologist Stuart Hameroff champion an idea which is similar in nature, but different from both the consciousness-field idea and the standard idea. Called Orchestrated Objective Reduction (Orch OR), the short version is that consciousness comes from quantum collapse facilitated through micro-tubules within our neurons. Personally I'm a fan of this hypothesis. It proposes an answer to the question of consciousness, it allows for free will (which I haven't given up on), and it's falsifiable. With enough research, we can confirm the idea or throw it away.

    3 votes
  6. Comment on Trump administration 'to announce plan to hold migrant children indefinitely in detention camps' in ~news

    CALICO Link Parent
    I have not. Best I can tell the latest highlights are: FOX polls showing Trump losing to three Dem Candidates Greenland nonsense Recession signals, $22T debt Epstein stuff NSA domestic-ops...

    I have not. Best I can tell the latest highlights are:

    • FOX polls showing Trump losing to three Dem Candidates
    • Greenland nonsense
    • Recession signals, $22T debt
    • Epstein stuff
    • NSA domestic-ops permanent authorization request
    • White Nationalist terror plot stuff
    • Trump threatening journalism
    4 votes
  7. Comment on Why Is Joe Rogan So Popular? He understands men in America better than most people do. The rest of the country should start paying attention. in ~misc

    CALICO Link Parent
    Mmmm, soft-disagree. Joe is a big fan of the ol' THC, but the JRE isn't the kind of 'get-high, ramble' format that Getting Doug With High is. Sure, there's plenty of episodes where Joe and the...

    Mmmm, soft-disagree.

    Joe is a big fan of the ol' THC, but the JRE isn't the kind of 'get-high, ramble' format that Getting Doug With High is. Sure, there's plenty of episodes where Joe and the guest are greener than Mother Earth—#1313 w/Duncan Trussel is a fun example of the very thing. But even that hilarious mess has a depth to it under the giggles.

    Just as well, there's more episodes where the vice is some whiskey, and even more are sober entirely

    Joe isn't exactly a scholar, granted. But I sure hope not very many people were operating under that assumption in the first place. But he does retain some information, which can inspire questions with another guest. I see that mostly with scientific guests.

    Overall, the whole podcast is largely apolitical in conversation. It's relaxed with a variety of guests from all sorts of backgrounds, and I find it difficult to condemn the whole thing just because of some guests like Ben Shapiro or Alex Jones. Most guests aren't them, and I enjoy JRE despite those episodes—although the most recent Alex Jones episode had me rolling along with Joe at some of the shit tumbling from Jones' mouth like pearls of nutcase-ness.

    6 votes
  8. Comment on Why Is Joe Rogan So Popular? He understands men in America better than most people do. The rest of the country should start paying attention. in ~misc

    CALICO (edited ) Link Parent
    I see a man with a thirst for knowing and the platform to quench it. I've watched quite a lot of his podcasts, and I think many people are incorrectly under the assumption that Joe is some...

    just what do people see in JRE?

    I see a man with a thirst for knowing and the platform to quench it.

    I've watched quite a lot of his podcasts, and I think many people are incorrectly under the assumption that Joe is some alt-right kind of figure. Yeah, he's done shows with far-right people, and considers wackos like Alex Jones to be among his friends. He's also expressed quite a lot of sympathy towards Democratic-aligned issues, and is on the record as being left. I could probably find an exact quotation and timestamp for one of his more explicit examples of this.

    My read on his character is that he's an earnest man, with a big-heart, and has a lot of views that shouldn't be all that surprising coming from a GenX'r who clearly isn't balls-deep in politics.

    I love the JRE, but I don't watch every episode. I skip every MMA guest, and most comedians or musicians. I live for the episodes when the guest is a scientist, researcher, or drives the conversation towards philosophy. The fringe ideas are a lot of fun too. Graham Hancock is a blast to listen to, and while he goes quite far in a few places he is being partially vindicated by new evidence. Eric Weinstein thinks he might have a Theory of Everything, feels apprehensive to publish, but plans to. Then there's figures like Aubrey de Grey, Brian Cox, David Sinclair, Rhonda Patrick, Lex Fridman, and others. Joe gets these fascinating people to sit down, for hours, to talk about anything and everything entirely unscripted. Any other interviewer would get maybe an hour, at best, and the conversation would be far more superficial. Joe gets people to open up. He throws them weird questions the type of which that only somebody genuinely fascinated could. He doesn't even really interview people most of time. They're often proper conversations, and they're human. There's not anywhere else that I know of where I can regularly expect that kind of thing.

    12 votes
  9. Comment on Moving out tips in ~life

    CALICO Link
    Make friends. Meet people. Find third-places. Build a social life. For me, the hardest part of living somewhere new is the lack of substantial human contact. If all I have are superficial...

    Make friends. Meet people. Find third-places. Build a social life. For me, the hardest part of living somewhere new is the lack of substantial human contact. If all I have are superficial relationships, I go stir-crazy and become some kind of hermit.

    If there is anything about yourself you don't like or want to change, now is the best time to do it. Moving to a new home means a new routine. A new status quo. If there's something you've been meaning to do, starting now and incorporating it into your new normal is the easiest, most painless way to do it.

    If you'll be living alone, get something alive and keep it alive. A pet, a plant, doesn't matter. Having something to take care of, watching it grow, keeping it happy, is extremely beneficial to the mind. And it'll help make home feel a little more like home.

    Learn to cook some basic meals, if you don't know how. It's easy to do, it's theory more than anything. Cheaper than eating out, and easier to make sure you're not eating trash.

    Don't be afraid to decorate. It's your space. It's an expression of yourself and you have an opportunity to explore what that means in a new way. My last place I strung up with Christmas lights, hung hippie-ass artwork, always had incense burning, owned an unreasonable amount of plants that one of my idiot cats insisted on eating, and there were comfy blankets all over the god damn place. It wasn't an organized, orthodox, adult space. It was my space. It was my home and it massaged my brain to be at home. Explore what home means to you. Follow your bliss.

    16 votes
  10. Comment on Does anybody here use a wake up light? in ~health

    CALICO Link
    I've previously been in the position where I did just leave my blinds open, and woke up with the sun. I'd set a backup alarm just so I wasn't ever late if I stayed asleep for cloudy weather or...

    I've previously been in the position where I did just leave my blinds open, and woke up with the sun. I'd set a backup alarm just so I wasn't ever late if I stayed asleep for cloudy weather or otherwise reasons.

    It was really nice. Far preferable to being shocked out of sleep by nightmare sounds. Waking up sucked less, and I felt better throughout the whole morning.

    Presumably a light would work in a similar way. I have a hard time believing the device is worth its $200 though. That's got to be niche-tax tacked on there. It seems easy enough to make with a dimmable light, microcontroller of choice, and handful of spare garbage.

    6 votes
  11. Comment on Trump’s foreign policy crisis arrives in ~news

    CALICO (edited ) Link Parent
    There are four major powers of influence currently in the world. US, EU, Russia, and China. Five, if you count the monetary influence of the GCC. Russia is attacking the US and EU, weakening...

    But why do they need to be competed with, presumably in a struggle for power that it is preferred that China lose?

    There are four major powers of influence currently in the world. US, EU, Russia, and China. Five, if you count the monetary influence of the GCC.

    Russia is attacking the US and EU, weakening Western Democracies while performing aggression on former Soviet States. The government is held by a man who's held power, though not the Presidency, since essentially the Soviet Union's collapse. When Putin's term is up, it's doubtful he'll truly yield power. The Oligarchs that own much of Russia's industry are highly tied to their organized crime, and arguably there isn't much separating the two.

    China is led by an authoritarian President with a lifelong rule. They're unprecedented in their Orwellianism, and their people have little voice. There's ethnic cleansing ongoing, and the government is frighteningly nationalistic. They are investing heavily in African infrastructure, which opens up vast wealth in the form of resources that won't be so accessible to anyone else. Their sphere of influence is wide, and they are expanding it. Especially now that the US is becoming less reliable resisting it under this administration.

    Saudi Arabia funds religious extremism, and their investments into renewables will keep them relevant even in a post-oil world.

    The US and EU are the only powers that are democratic and progressive, however flawed. And both are under attack.

    China needs to be competed with, at least to maintain the balance of influences. If the US and/or EU drop in relevance enough then the world powers will be mostly authoritarian. If one values democratic systems of government, then it would be wise to prevent countries like Russia and China from having too much control and influence over world affairs.

    The West has its share of problems, there's no shortage of sin on its shoulders or blood on its hands. But I value democratic governance over the alternatives.

    edit: bad at grammar

    12 votes
  12. Comment on Facebook is funding brain experiments to create a device that reads your mind in ~tech

    CALICO Link Parent
    Neural interfaces, if sufficiently comprehensive, might have a few interesting uses outside of employment and markets. I'm mostly interested in the technology for what it means to be human, to be...

    Neural interfaces, if sufficiently comprehensive, might have a few interesting uses outside of employment and markets. I'm mostly interested in the technology for what it means to be human, to be a human that's more.

    The human thought process is a wild storm of abstraction. Layered. Almost chaotic. And it's a singular experience. The self can only ever be experienced by itself. Language, music, art. They can capture some of what happens in our minds, and allows it to be shared with others. But communication between selves is lossy, inexact, and time consuming. It's low-bandwidth, and often more is lost in the transition than we intend. A technology that could directly interface two or more minds together, that could connect one subjective experience to another, would be a revolution on par with the development of language itself.

    What would it mean for the human experience to remove that barrier between minds?
    Instead of telling you what I think, you could think my thoughts. Feel my feelings. Dream, my dreams.
    What would that mean for interpersonal relationships? Intimacy? Politics?
    How would that change society? How would that change culture? Education? Invention?

    When I look at brain-computer interfaces, I don't see a tool for simple productivity. I see an opportunity to transcend our biological limitations, to improve upon our unguided evolution.

    Outwardly, the human animal hasn't really changed in 200,000 years. Internally, the human mind has been modern for 70,000 years. Are we done? I'd like to see what we can be.

    2 votes
  13. Comment on What are you reading these days? #26 in ~books

    CALICO Link Parent
    A Game of Thrones put a bitter taste in my mouth for epic fantasy adaptations, to be honest. But if this Wheel of Time adaptation goes well, I might have faith that something Cosmere could be done...

    A Game of Thrones put a bitter taste in my mouth for epic fantasy adaptations, to be honest. But if this Wheel of Time adaptation goes well, I might have faith that something Cosmere could be done justice. It would be a tall order, for sure.

    The Wax & Wayne books are... fine? It's difficult to judge them based on their own merit; to divorce them from Era 1 is impossible. They're such a smaller scope compared to the first trilogy that I found reading through them to be rather jarring. I liked them, but I don't really remember all that much about them. They weren't originally planned to be a part of the Mistborn Sequence, and it shows. I like them, but I like them the least of all Cosmere books except for Elantris (which I judge to be the weakest novel of Brando Sando's).

    Bands of Mourning was definitely my favorite installment of Era 2. The scope felt a little wider, and it feels more Cosmere-relevant compared to Alloy of Law, or Shadows of Self. It made me excited for the next one, to be honest.

    2 votes
  14. Comment on What are you reading these days? #26 in ~books

    CALICO (edited ) Link
    I'm currently re-reading all of Brandon Sanderson's published Cosmere novels. I first started reading them at the behest of my partner a few years ago, back before I knew that all of these books...

    I'm currently re-reading all of Brandon Sanderson's published Cosmere novels. I first started reading them at the behest of my partner a few years ago, back before I knew that all of these books were part of a shared universe—or rather, star cluster. Much to my chagrin, after having sworn myself off unfinished series, I've found myself caring too much about a literary project that won't be finished for a few decades.

    God damn it.

    I've recently finished re-reading Era 1 of Mistborn (The Final Empire, The Well of Ascension, & The Hero of Ages).

    Set in a pre-industrial society held static by the one-thousand year old Lord Ruler, our hero discovers her ability to use metal-based magics and attempts to overthrow The Final Empire with a gang of lovable miscreants.

    One of my favorite fantasy series, that I think I appreciate more after reading the second time. I laughed again, I cried again, and it was just as fun reliving the story again.

    Just today I've started to reread Oathbringer, Book 3 of 10, and most recent installment of, The Stormlight Archive. A doorstopper epic fantasy series, each volume is essentially a full trilogy in their own right and I really don't know how to sell it to anyone. It will surely go down in history as a masterwork of fantasy, if the quality persists through to the end.

    It features a brooding slave boy with a magical sidekick, the King's Uncle and his visions granted by a dead God, a wise-ass scholar with a mysterious past and questionable mental stability, a war, an apocalypse, gods and kind-of-gods and almost-like-gods-if-you-squint, disgusting lizard-crab things, glowing marble money, marble people, magic rocks, assassins, secret societies, cults, and the platonic ideal of a DnD Bard.

    It's A Game of Thrones crossed with Dragonball Z.

    It's The Prince of Persia crossed with Avatar: The Last Airbender.

    It's a real good time crossed with a delight.

    Read it, you fucks.

    6 votes
  15. Comment on The Guardian newspaper has lost two trans employees over its reporting on trans issues in ~lgbt

    CALICO Link Parent
    Perhaps a more visual indication would be beneficial when viewing one's own comments. Currently if a comment has reached a noise threshold then it should appear auto-collapsed, and at the bottom...

    Perhaps a more visual indication would be beneficial when viewing one's own comments. Currently if a comment has reached a noise threshold then it should appear auto-collapsed, and at the bottom of a comment thread. Not easy to verify from just looking at our user page, granted.

    1 vote
  16. Comment on What are your long term savings goals? Are you saving towards a purchase of anything in particular? in ~life

    CALICO Link
    Short Term (3–12 months) Become debt free. Build a 6-month buffer. Enough to cover expenses, and social life stuff. Sometimes time between contracts can go on longer than expected, and I really...

    Short Term (3–12 months)

    • Become debt free.
    • Build a 6-month buffer. Enough to cover expenses, and social life stuff. Sometimes time between contracts can go on longer than expected, and I really don't want to go back to eating spaghetti every day for months.
    • Save enough to pay an entire year of rent upfront. My credit score is less than ideal, and I figure this will help avoid any issues when I decide to get another job stateside.
    • Alt: if the economy implodes in the next year, and housing costs plummet, poise myself to have a very reasonable down payment to snatch up a house while prices are low. Again, with a credit score like mine I'd like to have as much as possible upfront to assuage the hesitations of lenders.

    Tall Term (1–5 years)

    • If we weren't in Recession territory before, we are now. Save to secure a house on the cheap. It might be my only chance to become a homeowner in the kind of area I'm likely to find employment in my career-field. I know more than few people 20+ years my senior, still caught in the rent trap.
    • If housing has been secured, save to install upgrades for self-sufficiency: solar, power storage, water, etc. as allowed by local ordinances.
    • Purchase an electric vehicle, ideally in cash. The tech should be much improved, and my plebeian petromobile is a source of personal shame.

    Grande Term (5–15 years)

    • If we haven't had a President who's achieved tuition-free/affordable-tuition by now, save to pay for university. As much as I can upfront so I don't get loan-trapped.
    • Upgrade housing if possible. Either way, save for luxury and homesteading shit such as: giant fuck-off bathtub. Sauna. Isolation tank. Greenhouses (plural). Pigs, ducks, chickens. Land.

    Venti Term (15–80 years)
    Assuming all of the above is secured:

    • Mostly just invest and save for in-case I'm lucky enough to become old.
    • Cool cybernetics I guess. If they become possible.
    • Starline Ticket to Mars or the Moon or some dope-ass space habitat. If this isn't possible in my lifetime I'll be disappointed in you, your family, everyone you know and don't know. If we don't have a sci-fi future then my 8yo inner-self is gonna be mad as all hell.
    • Cryogenics maybe. I'm not convinced on the scientific or philosophical success of it, but fuck it. If it works I get to see what humanity becomes capable of in the future. If it doesn't, I'll be dead and probably won't be capable of being disappointed.

    Trenta Term (80–1,000 years)

    • Our civilization hasn't gone tits-up? Nice. Gotta say, y'all had me worried in the first half of the 21st century.
    • Are we still doing money?
    • How much to turn myself into an immortal spaceship?
    • Jesus Christ what am I still doing around.
    • GeForce RTX 2080 Ti, x2 SLI
    4 votes
  17. Comment on Yield Curves Invert in U.S., U.K. as ‘Doom and Gloom’ Spreads in ~news

    CALICO Link Parent
    The Unemployment Rate also doesn't count those who have stopped looking for a job entirely. Combine that with underemployment, and reality begins to look not as great as 3.7% sounds.

    The Unemployment Rate also doesn't count those who have stopped looking for a job entirely. Combine that with underemployment, and reality begins to look not as great as 3.7% sounds.

    6 votes