CALICO's recent activity

  1. Comment on Finland and Sweden's path to potential NATO membership – updating thread for news and opinion pieces [2022-05-24] in ~news

    CALICO
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    18 May BRUSSELS (AP) — NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said Wednesday that Finland, Sweden have officially applied to join the world’s biggest military alliance, a move driven by security...

    18 May
    BRUSSELS (AP) — NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said Wednesday that Finland, Sweden have officially applied to join the world’s biggest military alliance, a move driven by security concerns over Russia’s war in Ukraine.

    “I warmly welcome the requests by Finland and Sweden to join NATO. You are our closest partners,” Stoltenberg told reporters after a receiving their application letters from the two Nordic countries’ ambassadors. “This is a good day at a critical moment for our security.”

    Finland, Sweden submit NATO membership application - AP

    2 votes
  2. Comment on Meteorites could have brought all five genetic 'letters' of DNA to early Earth in ~space

    CALICO
    Link
    This is more of a tangential thought, (and I may well go off track, sorry) but this topic has brought it back to the front of my brain—and perhaps it'll yield some interesting discussion here: the...

    This is more of a tangential thought, (and I may well go off track, sorry) but this topic has brought it back to the front of my brain—and perhaps it'll yield some interesting discussion here: the focus on panspermia over abiogenesis in some circles always seemed a little odd to me.

    As I understand it, our current understanding of the early ocean, deep sea thermal vents, and chemistry, allow for abiogenesis to work without any major complications. Those same understandings could easily apply to other celestial bodies, given similar conditions, which allows for the possibility of extraterrestrial life to similarly arise from the nonliving-matter of their "host" "body".

    Why is so much intellectual labor being put into panspermia-related research, when (correct me if I'm wrong) there's nothing wrong with our current theories surrounding abiogenesis?

    The concept of life on, Earth, for example, arising from specific molecules or sometimes simple organisms present on a space rock/dust, colliding with the atmosphere and seeding the planet.. that always seemed to me like kicking the can. One would then have to explain where that stuff had come from.

    This article does provide me with a satisfying explanation for that, however. So now I can see some more merit.

    But, now I have more thoughts. If life were seeded on Earth from space, then for it to be a successful seeding the environment the compounds arrive at would have to have the appropriate prebiotic conditions & raw materials available to allow for the chemical reproduction of these compounds to occur, and thus allow for our understanding of early evolution to then take place. Does this now over-complicate things in contrast to our current theories regarding abiogenesis? Deep sea thermal vents are already heated chemical factories in an aquatic environment.

    My understanding is that we currently believe that life only began once on Earth (or at least, any other potential life seems to have died out & we haven't found evidence to suggest its existence). Is it not more likely it began around a thermal vent in the ocean, or some similar environment of early Earth, than it is to suggest meteorites or their debris ended up in a part of the Earth with the appropriate chemicals and conditions to then self replicate?

    It would also seem to make the successful seeding of other celestial bodies similarly more problematic, if they then as well must have these same prebiotic conditions and the statistical chance of the appropriate space debris making it to the appropriate location. Wouldn't that lower the overall probability of life (as we understand it) on other worlds, compared to if these worlds were "permitted" to have their own abiogenesis in their own thermal vents (or whatever)?

    I suppose there's validity in putting energy into this if we're thinking about the forms life can take, and if life NEEDS to be built from A/T/C/G/U, or if a hypothetical extraterrestrial life-form could use different chemicals, arranged in something unlike the DNA or RNA molecules. I understand that carbon based life is the only form of complex life that is theoretically stable, or likely. So I guess it would be natural to then ask if the form that carbon based life has taken on Earth, is the only way life can work.

    Finding all the nucleotides in space is interesting, but doesn't seem to answer anything on its own, right? Not for my questions anyway.

    I guess then abiogenesis and panspermia are both firmly on the table, but the body of evidence & the logic behind abiogenesis still far outweighs panspermia to me. Absent of any examples of extraterrestrial life that we could examine on a molecule level, we can't know for sure if life needs to be DNA & RNA made of A/T/C/G/U or not.

    Personally, I take the fringe position that life must be carbon-based; use DNA/RNA; be built on nucleotides generally, if not A/T/C/G/U specifically; that life might have originated on Earth multiple times & we would be hard-pressed to tell through genetic analysis, because life can only be built this way, the conditions of Earth are the conditions of Earth, and the results between an evolutionary tree with one trunk, or several, would appear (and may actually be) nearly identical; and that we can use life on Earth as an excellent model of what to both look for and expect in any potential extraterrestrial life. That is, not that aliens would be like Star Trek—basically human with latex forehead prosthetics. (although I can make an argument for the selective pressures for intelligent bipedal "humanoids"), but that extraterrestrial life would be identifiable to us as life. We would recognize it for life, and unless it evolved in an environment very different from conditions we find on Earth (from the mundane, to the extreme), then it would appear no stranger than a virus, a unicellular organism, or a fungi, mammal, reptile, etc. and no more bizarre than what we see in the midnight zone of our oceans, or anywhere throughout the evolutionary record.
    There's an asterisk in here somewhere, regarding mitochondria, and the probability of that happening *at all *, here, regardless of the potential for something similar to happen elsewhere, but I'm already brain-dumping a wall of text, so.

    So from that standpoint, this article is interesting to me because it shows some level of prevalence towards nucleotides existing outside of the Earth. Specifically having a celestial origin implies some lack of rarity in the nucleotides existing, just generally. That raises the likelihood of them existing on say, a stable enough body, for long enough, to be allowed the potential to undergo evolution in some form. I find it suggestive (w/r/t my above position) that we're finding these bases, but not much more there.

    I don't really know where to go from here, this was entirely stream of consciousness.

    Thoughts?

    4 votes
  3. Comment on I finally understand why evangelicals support Trump, and it's not just hypocrisy, mindless anti-gay, or stupdity in ~talk

    CALICO
    Link Parent
    "Reject Modernity, Embrace Tradition"

    "Reject Modernity, Embrace Tradition"

  4. Who's releasing comfy, casual, interesting, and/or educational, long-form video content regularly?

    It's time to find new creators to follow—ideally folks who upload often enough that I probably won't forget they exist, and whose videos are long enough to enjoy. A few of my top, still-active...

    It's time to find new creators to follow—ideally folks who upload often enough that I probably won't forget they exist, and whose videos are long enough to enjoy.

    A few of my top, still-active creators:

    While their topics aren't related (and don't limit yourself to them), they all upload relatively long-form content on a pretty regular basis. They all fill a niche comfortably, and uniquely—with their own personality. There's usually something to learn, and something to chew on, and something to laugh at.
    And they're not all so big that we've all heard of them before (except, perhaps RLM)


    Who do you actively follow?

    What niches do they fill?

    22 votes
  5. The Reuters livestream of Kyiv is peak surrealism

    I'm in a weird space right now. There's been some reports in the media that there were indications Russia may move to invade Ukraine by as early as.. right about the time of my posting this. I...

    I'm in a weird space right now.

    There's been some reports in the media that there were indications Russia may move to invade Ukraine by as early as.. right about the time of my posting this.

    I fancy myself informed, so I find a Reuters livestream of Maidan Square, Kyiv, Ukraine on YouTube to put on in the background. Expecting I might need to move it to the foreground at some point tonight, unless Russia doesn't make that particular move, but really hoping for just boring traffic sounds.

    Soon there's some loudspeaker playing the Soviet Nation Anthem, some RuneScape music, at approx. 0100 Kyiv time (2300 UTC) it starts playing Komm, süßer Tod—the track from the apocalypse in End of Evangelion, Caramelldansen, the Space Jam theme song..

    I'm sitting here expecting to hear just traffic sounds, hoping not to hear the sounds of war, and I'm listening to THIS?

    These are all meme songs. 4chan memes.

    At 0138L a voice yelled "Fuck Jannies", more 4chan culture

    What is life, anymore?

    Someone physically there is doing some kind of bit to troll whoever can hear them, or this is reflections of the alleged cyber attacks from a few hours ago..and it's old 4chan memes from ages ago.

    Can I just take a moment, and highlight how absurd this is? Life has become art, and its genre is surrealism. Or something close to it, I wasn't an Art Major. If I hear war sounds later tonight on this same stream I'm gonna shit.

    I've lived through some stuff, but nothing has ever felt this strange.

    Reuters, LIVE: View of Kyiv's Maidan Square amid Russia-Ukraine crisis

    What's up with y'all?

    23 votes
  6. Comment on Hi, how are you? Mental health support and discussion thread (February 2022) in ~talk

    CALICO
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    I'm going through some kind of character arc, I think. I've always been, pretty militantly, anti-label—for myself. I'm me. Fuck you. But getting these ADHD, and ASD labels, and learning my gender...

    I'm going through some kind of character arc, I think.

    I've always been, pretty militantly, anti-label—for myself. I'm me. Fuck you.

    But getting these ADHD, and ASD labels, and learning my gender stuff is uhhhhh statistically co-morbid to both of those?
    How much of me, is me?

    That painful memory? Turns out, that was an autism.
    That one, worst struggle? That's an ADHD.
    This gender thing? Tons of ADHD/ASD folks also got that.

    I used to just be me, but now I'm—at least significantly part—this neurodivergent triad that made much of my life events and interests and struggles this kind of predetermined horseshit?

    Eat my ass. I'll rage against Determinism until I die.

    As it turns out, most of my close social group is neurodivergent—I guess we all subconsciously just found each other and vibed through that commonality—so I have a wealth of perspectives to mine for their wisdom. I'm doing alright.

    But it's still a lot, ya know?
    Woulda been nice to have know this twenty years ago.

    I've been spending a great deal of time inside my head going over everything, processing it all. I have my sad moments, my regrets, my pains, my frustrations, the works. But I'm reading the literature, talking to my psych, and my friends have been there before me. I already feel myself changing as I understand myself on this deeper level. I'm gonna come out of this a different person. I don't know what that person looks like yet; I can only hope they're cool


    Also I'm down nearly 55lb/25kg, and a four-pack is starting to poke out for the first time in my life. So, it's not all complicated feelings lmao

    7 votes
  7. Comment on Is there any evidence that military hazing (shouting, abuse, etc) is conducive to better soldiers? in ~talk

    CALICO
    (edited )
    Link
    Only my personal, anecdotal evidence; US, enlisted during the Obama years. Basic Training "hazing" felt mostly productive, IMO. It wasn't the point where I'd classify it as hazing, or abuse. Not...
    • Exemplary

    Only my personal, anecdotal evidence; US, enlisted during the Obama years.

    Basic Training "hazing" felt mostly productive, IMO. It wasn't the point where I'd classify it as hazing, or abuse. Not Full Metal Jacket, by any means.
    And for what it's worth, I'm under the understanding that Basic has chilled out quite a lot since the beginning, and the old guys all think Basic is too soft for the new recruits. (shit happens, it's not perfect, but in the US it's not as intense as Hollywood has made it look) I understand it's chilled out more, since my time there, too.

    The strict constraints, and the punishments (mostly push-ups, flutter kicks, jumping jacks, etc) weren't overly prescribed (by my own judgement), or given out for nonsense reasons. (they sometimes felt like nonsense in the moment, but in retrospect I can see the objective of Basic was to take many dozens of strangers with many dozens of backstories, and give them a new foundation that military training can build upon).

    That's really my big take-away from Basic. I learned very little about what it was to be a service-member there; that came mostly from my job training, and working my job over the course of my enlistment) For the most part, it served largely an "administrative" kind of role that was just the set-up beginning to my military career. I left Basic with the ability to work with groups of strangers towards a common objective under the direction of an authority I didn't have the freedom to openly question. I picked up some history knowledge, and some of the cultural vibe of my particular branch too, but largely the exercise felt mostly structured to get random folks:

    • some level of basic fitness
    • able to work in teams
    • listen to your NCO/CO
    • follow instructions

    There was a surprisingly amount of time spent in a classroom environment as well. Most of the waking day, it felt like. General military education stuff (the laws we're bound by, regulations we're subject to, first aid, combat aid, how to put on a chemical suit and get gassed with something unpleasant)

    Very little of the experience was the popular image of Basic Training, and what there was felt appropriate (to me).

    After Basic, I never saw that shit again. They don't need that stuff anymore, and you can go on to your next training location to learn your specific job in a more chill environment (still military though, so not 100% chill). Once you're out of training, and doing your job, it's just like a normal work dynamic 95% of the time. Most service members never see combat, or deal with tangentially related, stressful positions. So, no? I'm making an assumption here (because I was not combat personnel) that those jobs touch on that kind of stress in their own way in their individual training pipelines.

    My N=1 evidence, may not be reflective of the general experience, your mileage may vary, some terms & conditions may apply


    The experiences will vary quite a lot—I imagine—by year of enlistment, country of service, and branch of service (Army, Navy, etc.)
    All the hazing, abuse, sexual assault, etc. that I have personal awareness of would be incidents resulting from shitty individuals, not an expression of a systematic issue (not in military, I could blame some other systems for those particular incidents however).

    Which isn't to say the US Military Training system isn't broken or flawed, only rather, I think the general population has an incorrect and imprecise understanding of how mundane most of the military experience is, and how low-intensity those dramatic Hollywood moments can look in real life.

    I didn't feel that Basic gave me any tools for dealing with the high stress situations I did find myself in (I learned those later), but that isn't to say the other recruits I served with didn't learn anything then.

    31 votes
  8. Comment on Give me your instant pot recipes! in ~food

    CALICO
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    Not so much a recipe, but a tip: If you're making plain, white rice, toss in a couple of smashed garlic cloves & a star anise; it'll make your rice a little more worth a damn. If you're a...

    Not so much a recipe, but a tip:

    If you're making plain, white rice, toss in a couple of smashed garlic cloves & a star anise; it'll make your rice a little more worth a damn.

    If you're a licorice-adverse, I can't help you. Nobody can.

    I'm sorry.

    2 votes
  9. Comment on Hi, how are you? Mental health support and discussion thread (December 2021) in ~talk

    CALICO
    Link
    In a very short time I've gone from: more than three decades on this Earth thinking I was a bit odd, but mostly "normal"; to finding out not only do I have ADHD pretty hardcore, but I score pretty...

    In a very short time I've gone from: more than three decades on this Earth thinking I was a bit odd, but mostly "normal"; to finding out not only do I have ADHD pretty hardcore, but I score pretty high on the RAADS-R. Not "the" high score, but a high score (this is a WIP with my doc). Probable Asperger's.
    Six months ago, I'd never even suspected.

    I'm having a lot of emotions about it. None of them are despair or anything, and a lot of myself suddenly makes a lot of sense. Doing a lot of reading right now.
    But I'm very frustrated I'm only finding out now. Just having this language and context has given me so many new tools to modify how I interact with the world.

    I could have avoided hurting some people I love very deeply if I had these tools years ago.

    Communication is hard; hearts are fragile.


    It's just weird nobody in my life noticed before. Apparently I've got an aptitude for masks (learned that term just the other day). Like, outside of an Adderall script, what do I do with this information? I've managed to forge myself into a useful person already, so I guess it's more about personal understanding and interpersonal interactions.

    Curious road ahead 🚶

    4 votes
  10. Comment on What did you do this weekend? in ~talk

    CALICO
    Link
    I got my septum pierced, after several years of waffling. Glad I went through with it! Pain level was on par with plucking a stubborn nose hair, and lasted about as long. I look awesome 🌟 A good...

    I got my septum pierced, after several years of waffling.
    Glad I went through with it! Pain level was on par with plucking a stubborn nose hair, and lasted about as long.

    I look awesome 🌟


    A good bit of my hesitation was linked to social perception of facial piercings, and working in a professional environment doesn't help.

    Thankfully I got a horseshoe in, so I can easily hide it around the office. But there's a couple others I'd like someday, and there's no hiding those. It's kind of shit that folks care enough about this sort of thing that it can negatively impact your career.

    2 votes
  11. Comment on Angus & Julia Stone - Nothing Else (2017) [Paste Magazine] in ~music

  12. Comment on What are you reading these days? in ~books

    CALICO
    Link Parent
    Fans differ on their thoughts. Personally I love all of the ones that Frank wrote, and didn't care as much for the ending his son wrote. Just had a different feel, y'know? But others love the...

    Fans differ on their thoughts. Personally I love all of the ones that Frank wrote, and didn't care as much for the ending his son wrote. Just had a different feel, y'know? But others love the ending; it's individual. But I also thought the fourth book was the peak, and thematically it's the end of an arc, so. But ALSO the last book Frank wrote is really good, I just can't abide cliffhangers!

    But I'm just one internet voice among many.

    2 votes
  13. Comment on What are you reading these days? in ~books

    CALICO
    Link Parent
    Re: Dune So, it seems Frank Herbert felt similarly. The next book—Dune Messiah—makes a time-jump but deals with the repercussions of Paul usurping the Emperor and embracing the Fremen messianic...
    Re: Dune

    the conclusion felt overly simple

    So, it seems Frank Herbert felt similarly. The next book—Dune Messiah—makes a time-jump but deals with the repercussions of Paul usurping the Emperor and embracing the Fremen messianic figure. It's very good. It also leans towards the psychic element that Herbert was fascinated by, and introduces some very important concepts that get explored deeper in the further novels.

    Would recommend.

    3 votes
  14. Comment on Squidward Alone (1440x3200) in ~creative

    CALICO
    (edited )
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    Background: I just got myself a new phone, needed a wallpaper, didn't have anything on hand in the appropriate resolution. Been on a nostalgia trip lately, watched this classic OG SpongeBob...

    Background: I just got myself a new phone, needed a wallpaper, didn't have anything on hand in the appropriate resolution. Been on a nostalgia trip lately, watched this classic OG SpongeBob episode recently.

    Took a bit and put this together.

    Cinema 4D, Photoshop


    Edit: this should have been posted in ~creative, if any of y'all have that superpower to move posts, if you could kindly move this I'd appreciate it.

    6 votes
  15. Comment on MIT scientists report 'major advance' in fusion energy in ~science