CALICO's recent activity

  1. Comment on Share a link to good singing in a language that you don't understand in ~music

  2. Comment on Tilderinoo Gamers and Game Night in ~games

    CALICO
    Link
    I like the idea of it, though my schedule & geographic location make it difficult. My availability is no sooner than 1800 GMT (1300 EST), and (ideally) no later than 2300 GMT (1800 EST). Anything...

    I like the idea of it, though my schedule & geographic location make it difficult.

    My availability is no sooner than 1800 GMT (1300 EST), and (ideally) no later than 2300 GMT (1800 EST).
    Anything where latency becomes an issue, I'm restricted to any of y'all in Central Asia, the Middle East, or very-Eastern Europe. I once made it through a game of Among Us with some folks speaking Czech without disconnecting, but that was a rare happening; most of my games are with folks from around Central Asia.

    5 votes
  3. Comment on Timasomo 2020 Thread #2: Update Thread 1 in ~creative

    CALICO
    Link
    I conceptualized an idea, and wrote down the bones, so I've got something to work off now. I've written very little since, but we're moving. As well, the US Election has finally been called so my...

    I conceptualized an idea, and wrote down the bones, so I've got something to work off now. I've written very little since, but we're moving.
    As well, the US Election has finally been called so my brain has now regained the ability to focus.

    Nice to see y'all are making progress!

    8 votes
  4. Comment on What movie (or series) really speaks to you, but which most people don't seem to "get" in ~movies

    CALICO
    Link Parent
    Aight, so here's where I meme less/hedge more; it's been probably two years since my last watch (going off memory), and I am not a physicist (formally educated in chemistry, self-taught in...

    Aight, so here's where I meme less/hedge more; it's been probably two years since my last watch (going off memory), and I am not a physicist (formally educated in chemistry, self-taught in greater-physics & philosophy). Below is my subjective interpretation of a piece of art.


    Re: The Power of Love,
    This is where the popular interpretation and my own, disagree. The line Brand (Anne Hathaway) that people focus on is:

    "Love is the one thing we're capable of perceiving that transcends dimensions of time and space. Maybe we should trust that, even if we can't understand it."

    It seems that a good amount of the audience has taken this to mean that love is objective, tangible, or measurable force in the Universe. My own interpretation is much opposite. In a story with a concern for physical laws, calling out love as important should be noteworthy; everyone in this story looks at the world through a very Reductive Materialist lens. Everything in this story is based on cause/effect, how Einstein's Relativity is a pain in the ass, the dangerously high costs of playing with the workings of the world. Love (from a more philosophical perspective) isn't anything so concrete. It's subjective, it's special, and unlike physical reactions & causal relationships it doesn't give a fuck about time or space (relativity; i.e. one of the antagonists of the story).

    This line should have stuck out to people. It's purposefully highlighted in the writing. Our heroes are in conflict with Relativity. Love is contrasted against Relativity. The writing says, "hey, more than cold, dead, unfeeling physics is important".

    Cooper succeeds in his mission because of his love for his daughter. It's not that he tapped into some hokey, hippie, spiritualist energy.
    His love for his daughter simply kept him going against all odds, against the Universe. His love enabled him to keep from giving up in the face of the impossible. His love enabled him to look the inevitable in the face and say, "fuck you, I'm going to try anyway".

    Re: The Ending,
    In short, there are probably three main concepts on the ontological nature of time: Presentism, Growing Block, and Eternalism.

    • Presentism: the Present exists, the Past & Future do not.
    • Growing Block: the Past & Present exists, the Future does not.
    • Eternalism: the Past, Present, & Future all exist at the "same time". We just experience time is casual-sequence because that's what we're limited to by existing within the dimension of time.

    Interstellar seems to side with Eternalism. The future-humans exist within higher dimensions than present-humans. This allows them to view & interact with the dimension of time, because they exist "above" or "outside" of it, unlike us.
    The Past, Present, and Future all already exist. The future-humans exist. The future-humans exist because Cooper succeeded. Cooper succeeded because the future-humans gave him the tools to succeed.
    This is a causal loop, or retrocausality, or something to do with closed timelike curves. This is where things get rapidly outside my level of proficiency in maths & physics, but as far as I understand the idea is sound—at least on an abstract level.

    The future-humans were responsible for the wormhole the Endurance travels through in the first act. The future-humans were responsible for the black hole Gargantua, or at least everything within the Even Horizon. The environment within Gargantua was artificially constructed by the future-humans. The artificial environment is a tesseract, that allows Cooper to interact with a space across different points in time. He interacts with the past (this whole thing was foreshadowed in the beginning of the film with the weird shit happening with that bookcase) to pass the quantum information TARS collected to Murph, and allows her to solve the problem of gravity. Then the future-humans yeet Cooper out into space (through the wormhole, right outside Saturn IIRC [there are ideas in physics that postulate that the interior of a black hole could function as a wormhole]) where he can be picked up & reunite with his daughter before her death.

    Love gave Cooper the will and the drive to ignore that his task was impossible; without love he might have accepted that the numbers and the situation was telling him that he & the humanity at large was fucked, and give up instead. That's all.

    Clear as mud?

    3 votes
  5. Comment on Joe Biden elected president in ~news

    CALICO
    Link
    frodo_its_done.gif ...but not really. The next 74 days are likely to be a shit-show. Buckle up, y'all. And outside of incarceration, he's unlikely to be disappearing from the public eye until his...

    frodo_its_done.gif


    ...but not really. The next 74 days are likely to be a shit-show. Buckle up, y'all. And outside of incarceration, he's unlikely to be disappearing from the public eye until his last day on this Earth.

    And yet, I couldn't help but to let go of more tension than I knew I was holding.

    43 votes
  6. Comment on What movie (or series) really speaks to you, but which most people don't seem to "get" in ~movies

    CALICO
    Link
    It's not that I think most people don't get it, but I think it doesn't speak to them on as a personal level it does to me. Or, that's the sense I get anyway. Interstellar (minor spoilers) is my...
    • Exemplary

    It's not that I think most people don't get it, but I think it doesn't speak to them on as a personal level it does to me. Or, that's the sense I get anyway.

    Interstellar (minor spoilers) is my favorite movie. It's not a perfect film, but it perfectly captures the despair I feel for the future in my darker moods—and the hope I grasp towards to get out.

    Donald (John Lithgow) is a elderly millennial whose life is the future I—an irl millennial—will live to experience (inshallah). His son-in-law, Cooper, (Matthew McConaughey) is a former NASA pilot, current farmer. During the later half of the 21st century, blights on crops & dust storms are driving humanity to the brink of extinction.

    Donald: I hear your meeting at the school didn’t go so well.
    Cooper: You heard? You know, it’s like we’ve forgotten who we are, Donald. Explorers, pioneers, not caretakers.
    Donald: When I was a kid, it felt like they made something new every day. Some gadget or idea. Like every day was Christmas. But six billion people, just try to imagine that. And every last one of them trying to have it all. This world isn’t so bad. And Tom will do just fine. You’re the one who doesn’t belong. Born forty years too late or forty years too early. My daughter knew it, God bless her. And your kids know it, especially Murph.
    Cooper: We used to look up at the sky and wonder at our place in the stars. Now we just look down and worry about our place in the dirt.
    Donald: Cooper, you were good at something and you never got a chance to do anything with it. I’m sorry.

    A lot of this movie makes me ugly-cry, and this exchange gets a choke. It also sets up the emotional stakes for the rest of the film; Cooper is fighting against a future that is quickly becoming inevitable. From being a farmer on a dying Earth, to fate itself getting in the way as he works to find a new home—a new future—for humankind. The film is about fighting an impossible fight. That's just what we humans do. The human tendency to reject reality, and substitute our own, through sheer willpower & drive to survive.

    That's where the poetic motif fits in:

    Do not go gentle into that good night,
    Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

    When I talk about Interstellar among friends, or casually on the internet, this aspect of the film doesn't get the attention I feel it deserves. To me, it looks to be the entire theme of the thing. And its setup-setting is a believable future that may someday exist (the decline of humanity as the Earth we've abused can't handle us anymore) that I may live to see. Most of these folks want to talk about the visuals (which are gorgeous), or rip on Anne Hathaway's character (you're missing the point), or complain that the ending doesn't make sense (you're objectively wrong).

    Cooper is a character who is fighting for a future worth living in, when everything around him signifies what a stupid & futile goal that is. He does it anyway. He risks his life, his relationship with his daughter, everything. Because there's a chance it's all worth it.
    I love his character, and sometimes I see a little of myself in how he was written.

    This movie is brilliant and it speaks to me and I love it and it makes me cry, and if you disagree then you're wrong and have bad opinions. Fight me IRL💪😤💪

    20 votes
  7. Comment on Cantonese Swiss Chicken Wings (瑞士鸡翼) in ~food

    CALICO
    Link Parent
    If you do, please drop a review somewhere I can find it!

    If you do, please drop a review somewhere I can find it!

    1 vote
  8. Comment on Silphium: The lost aphrodisiac of ancient Rome in ~food

    CALICO
    Link Parent
    While focused more on the recipes than the history, Historical Italian Cooking is a pretty neat channel as well. There's plenty of things here I'd love to make sometime.

    While focused more on the recipes than the history, Historical Italian Cooking is a pretty neat channel as well. There's plenty of things here I'd love to make sometime.

    1 vote
  9. Comment on Did any Tilders vote for Trump? And if so, why? in ~talk

    CALICO
    Link Parent
    He was banned (our first ban?). Got a little aggressive in commenting, if I remember right.

    He was banned (our first ban?). Got a little aggressive in commenting, if I remember right.

    4 votes
  10. Comment on 2020 US Presidential Election Day - Discussion Thread in ~talk

    CALICO
    Link
    Is anyone else trying to cope with the stress of today, through disassociating expectations v. hopes by playing the odds?

    Is anyone else trying to cope with the stress of today, through disassociating expectations v. hopes by playing the odds?

    6 votes
  11. Comment on Timasomo 2020 Thread #1: Roll Call and Beginning! in ~creative

    CALICO
    (edited )
    Link
    This month I commit to, writing a thing. A complete thing. Something I've learned about myself through prior experience, is that being real specific about a creative goal activates my neurological...

    This month I commit to, writing a thing. A complete thing.

    Something I've learned about myself through prior experience, is that being real specific about a creative goal activates my neurological reward system; it gives me the satisfaction of having done something, while removing all motivation to actually do it.

    So, I'll write a thing. A fictional thing. There will a plot, some themes, a cast of characters, a few arcs, and a conclusion. The length will be whatever it will be.

    If I can keep up this, my updates will be vague.
    If I finish, I'll let y'all know.
    If it's in a state to show off* in December, you'll see it.

    *no embarrassing typos; a comprehensible structure, plot, arcs; etc

    At the time of writing this post, I have no idea or plan. Another thing I do is get obsessive over ideas, and nothing gets done.

    This is mostly an experiment in non-commitment.

    Best of luck to you all in your projects 🤗

    9 votes
  12. Comment on TV Tuesdays Free Talk in ~tv

    CALICO
    Link
    I am: Sad, because I finished my rewatch of Star Trek: The Next Generation. If felt like, meeting up with old friend after years apart, and the feeling of reliving the good old days—knowing...

    I am:

    Sad, because I finished my rewatch of Star Trek: The Next Generation. If felt like, meeting up with old friend after years apart, and the feeling of reliving the good old days—knowing they're in the past, and that any new good days won't be like the old ones. Also, All Good Things... is such a well made series finale.

    Pissed, because I recently found out GLOW got cancelled, even though Netflix had previously greenlit its fourth and final season. COVID, I guess. But plenty of other shit is still gonna happen under Netflix. I cancelled my subscription. I've been hurt too many times by Netflix, and I can't just keep financially supporting a platform that keeps letting me down. That's just an abusive relationship brah. And leaving things on such an emotional cliffhanger? That's fucked up.

    Jazzed, because thanks to COVID and losing my whole perception of time's passage, the second season of The Mandalorian begins just a few days from now. It's exactly on time, but the time since the end of season one is a blur. It feels early.

    5 votes
  13. Comment on NASA's SOFIA has detected water molecules in the Moon's Clavius Crater, the first time water has been discovered on the sunlit surface in ~space

    CALICO
    Link Parent
    Not without it being a gigantic pain in the ass. The press release cites "100 to 412 parts per million" H2O per cubic meter. A 12oz bottle of water is on the more optimistic side of that range at...
    • Exemplary

    So... does that mean a potential moon mission could extract significant amounts of water from the moons surface somehow?

    Not without it being a gigantic pain in the ass.

    The press release cites "100 to 412 parts per million" H2O per cubic meter. A 12oz bottle of water is on the more optimistic side of that range at about 355 parts per million.

    12oz ≈ 355ml, and a cubic meter = 1,000L
    One 355ml bottle of water fills 0.0355% the volume of this cubic meter. It would take just short of 2,817 bottles of water to make a cubic meter's worth, to put the volume into a context. Another context, standard dirt here on Earth with standard gravity is roughly 1,300kg/m3 (at standard hydration).

    That's a lot of moon dirt to process for just one smallish bottle of water, and that's at the upper side of their ppm range.

    Advice varies on how much an adult human ought to drink per day, but it's a few liters generally. That works ought to an absurd amount of moon dirt to process for just one person. For any sizable population, or adding in agriculture, and we begin to look at a herculean task (even after considering the recyclability of water)

    It's not impossible. And if we're already farming a shitload of moon dirt for its water, we're probably also going to try and extract cool stuff like Helium-3 and elements-of-interest along the way. But I'm not sure I would call the amount of water extracted 'significant' unless mining the dirt for its metals and such is our main objective and collecting water is just a side project. The amount of dirt to process for a significant amount of water isn't likely to be worth it, unless we're looking to multitask.


    If we want to dream of a sci-fi future, it'll probably start with us bringing our water with us as we build an outpost near a source of water ice. Then from there build something to process that water ice to ensure a surplus, to allow for agriculture and a higher residential population. From there, begin mining the regolith for useful elements, water, and Helium-3 (if we want to pursue that as a fusion fuel, and think the juice is worth the squeeze).

    Starting out mining moon dirt might not be smart, but if it's there then it could be a valuable resource to harvest if our presence ever becomes large enough to need it.

    4 votes
  14. Comment on Borat 2 exposes a racist, sexist, but still ultimately inspiring America in ~movies

    CALICO
    Link Parent
    This seems to be the case. The first definition of satire that a quick google pulled for me was: The character Borat utilizes exaggeration of a Regional Stereotype, to the point of becoming...

    This seems to be the case.

    The first definition of satire that a quick google pulled for me was:

    the use of humor, irony, exaggeration, or ridicule to expose and criticize people's stupidity or vices, particularly in the context of contemporary politics and other topical issues.

    The character Borat utilizes exaggeration of a Regional Stereotype, to the point of becoming caricature, to appeal to the prejudices of a sub-section of the American populace, to expose those prejudices for ridicule.
    The subject of ridicule is that sub-section, not the Borat character. The whole premise of the character relies on the viewer to understand Borat is an unrealistic absurdity, that only a bigot or a moron could take as anything other than a mirror being held up against that sub-section of the population.

    There's certainly an argument that can be made, and a conversation to be had, on at what point a thing becomes racist. But I don't think Zeynep is going about making it in a productive way. Their two responses to another user pointing out the satire,

    If that were the case, he would have chosen his character to be an American or a Brit. Blackface minstrel shows aren't satirizing racism, and neither is Cohen.

    &

    Unsurprisingly, this is what many alt-right say when people object to naked racism in their humor. So it spreads across the political spectrum to patrol acceptable racism? I agree humor often flirts with cruelty & there are gray zones. But Cohen is over the cliff by a long mile.

    , feel dismissive and... fallacious? I'm not super well-versed on argumentative fallacies, but the first feels like shaky logic and the seconds seems to say: if you don't agree with me then you're much the same as being alt-right.

    The disinterest for nuance rubs me in an unpleasant way.

    9 votes
  15. Comment on What are you reading these days? in ~books

    CALICO
    Link
    I caved and read the sixteen pre-released chapters for Brandon Sanderson's Rhythm of War, because I'm impatient and can't wait the three weeks until full release. Haven't yet decided if that was a...

    I caved and read the sixteen pre-released chapters for Brandon Sanderson's Rhythm of War, because I'm impatient and can't wait the three weeks until full release. Haven't yet decided if that was a mistake or not, but I'm only more hyped for release-day.

    On top of that, I'm currently reading Kurt Vonnegut's Galápagos. I've enjoyed what I've read from him prior, but I don't know how I feel about this one yet. I'm only about a quarter through. We'll see.

    7 votes
  16. Comment on Proving the Earth is round at home in ~science

    CALICO
    Link
    I think the easiest way doesn't need math at all, but it does require access to the ocean. A small telescope, or some binoculars helps. But the ocean is key. If you have access to the ocean,...

    I think the easiest way doesn't need math at all, but it does require access to the ocean. A small telescope, or some binoculars helps. But the ocean is key.

    If you have access to the ocean, simply make yourself comfortable and wait for a ship in the area to head towards the horizon. In time, you can watch it disappear as it travels over the curve of the Earth. Sailboats are the best target for this, but any boat works just fine.

    4 votes
  17. Comment on New Zealand now has the gayest Parliament in the world in ~lgbt

    CALICO
    Link Parent
    Here's where I realize I've never read a formal study on the prevalence of queer folk among the general population, and have just been carrying a mental note of "3–5%-ish" around without much...

    Here's where I realize I've never read a formal study on the prevalence of queer folk among the general population, and have just been carrying a mental note of "3–5%-ish" around without much question.
    Got one in particular?

    2 votes
  18. Comment on New Zealand now has the gayest Parliament in the world in ~lgbt

    CALICO
    Link Parent
    There's surely studies regarding this, but here's my gut-feeling conjecture: People who know what oppression* feels like, are more likely to be active sociopolitically, compared to people who do...

    There's surely studies regarding this, but here's my gut-feeling conjecture:

    People who know what oppression* feels like, are more likely to be active sociopolitically, compared to people who do not.
    *sexual, racial, economic, etc.

    2 votes