GreaterPorpoise's recent activity

  1. Comment on 2022 Primetime Emmy Winners (Updating Live) in ~tv

    GreaterPorpoise
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    Good to see Abbott Elementary get some recognition early into its run, hopefully we won't lose it like we did One Day at a Time.

    Good to see Abbott Elementary get some recognition early into its run, hopefully we won't lose it like we did One Day at a Time.

    2 votes
  2. Comment on What are you reading these days? in ~books

    GreaterPorpoise
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    The series isn't a continuation of the same plot, each book can stand alone, it's just set in the same world! The second book is about a robot who finds work in a cafe and possibly love and the...

    The series isn't a continuation of the same plot, each book can stand alone, it's just set in the same world! The second book is about a robot who finds work in a cafe and possibly love and the third book is my favourite as it follows a human migration fleet and is a lot more thematic (about the cycle of life and death) than the first two books. The fourth is about different aliens getting stranded together following a disaster, which was the perfect pandemic read for me too.

    She also has another new series with a continuing plot (about a monk and a robot navigating a utopia while still feeling lost and disconnected from it) and a standalone novel called To Be Taught, If Fortunate, about a space travel mission being recounted in the hopes that some one back home is listening.

    She's my favourite author just because her queer hopepunk scifi is such a breath of fresh air compared to everything dark and gritty and dramatic these days. It gives me the same pleasure Ted Lasso does (without Ted Lasso's heavier mental health themes). But I understand it's definitely not for everybody or every reading mood. To me, they're progressive, thought-provoking comfort reads when life gets to be all too much.

    4 votes
  3. Comment on TV Tuesdays Free Talk in ~tv

    GreaterPorpoise
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    Hello! Just to clarify that it's from David Jenkins and not Taika Waititi, though he is very much involved and fans should check it out regardless of the names credited. Taika directed the first...

    Hello! Just to clarify that it's from David Jenkins and not Taika Waititi, though he is very much involved and fans should check it out regardless of the names credited. Taika directed the first episode but is only an actor for the rest, and the show's comedic genius and canonically queer heart, while very similar to other Taika-originated shows such as WWDITS, are entirely owed to Jenkins and his writing team (which includes qpoc).

    Edit: I should probably add on my own thoughts because this show has legitimately changed my life, to see queer representation done this way. Without any hint of queerbaiting, btw, I know, very very hard to believe but this is actually the real deal and that's why fandom internet circles are exploding over this show.

    It's comedy with heart, it's tightly-written but doesn't take itself too seriously except where it counts the most (characters and relationships). It's on the opposite end of the spectrum as Black Sails in tone and genre but shares a lot of themes with it. It is Ted Lasso but with pirates and a fair bit more violence. It's a pirate romcom (David Jenkins' words, not mine) but it's also about toxic masculinity and love and guilt and all these amazing themes you can read more deeply into it. But even at the surface level, this show is a joy (but also, there is some angst, to be fair).

    And this matters to very few here except me but it has the fastest growing fandom I've ever seen, going from less than 10 fanfics in the first few weeks to 1500+ fanfics and countless pieces of incredible fanart and other fan creations, which I think has been a very pleasant surprise for the cast and crew and fans too. This labour of love with its unabashed and casually revolutionary queer rep, has drawn so many people, including myself, out of their shells into the community and I just need people to know this is history in the making, for us, anyway.

    Side note, OFMD has yet to be officially renewed for S2 but from how the cast and crew have been tweeting, it's probably just stuck in contract negotiations. It's hard to see them not renewing when it's HBO's number one show atm, having overtaken both Euphoria and Boba Fett in demand.

    1 vote
  4. Comment on Putin is trying to take down the entire world order, the veteran Russia watcher said in an interview in ~misc

    GreaterPorpoise
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    Incidentally, I've just started Fiona Hill's book about Putin and I just wanted to emphasise it does not necessarily discredit her here, in terms of being qualified to contextualise Putin's...

    Incidentally, I've just started Fiona Hill's book about Putin and I just wanted to emphasise it does not necessarily discredit her here, in terms of being qualified to contextualise Putin's actions, past and present. (But I fully agree that factual reporting is more relevant at this time.)

    Disclaimer that I'm only on the second chapter (before I stopped to check tildes) but the first chapter really impressed me. They specifically examine how Putin's actions in 2014 broke pattern with his past behaviour (per analysis at the time), and reference a theory that pattern-breaking can reveal just as much (if not more) about a person's motives.

    As such, it's not really an account of his life (as they detail the many ways that that information on Putin is lacking or unreliable anyway), and more of an analysis of the narratives around Putin. Or to quote the book more precisely:

    Attempting to write about Vladimir Putin is thus a challenge for many reasons. One that we ourselves never imagined until we were well into this venture is that, like it or not, when you delve into his hidden aspects, whether in the past or present, you are playing a game with Putin. It is a game where he is in charge. He controls the facts and the “stories.” For that reason, every apparent fact or story needs to be regarded with suspicion. It has to be traced back to original sources. If that turns out to be impossible, or the source seems unreliable, what does one do with the information? As the reader will soon find out, we too use stories about Putin. But we do so with caution. We have tested the sources. When we were unable to do so to the fullest extent, we make that clear. Most important, we have learned to ask the question, “Why has this story been circulated?”

    They basically propose that Putin's inconsistent characterisations go beyond just wanting to be perceived a certain way: he wants to see how people react to that perception. The first half of the book is organised around the 6 different personas Putin uses to connect to different Russian demographics and achieve his goals.

    Personally, I'd recommend (albeit very prematurely and only for the interested with spoons to spare) reading the book (Mr. Putin: Operative in the Kremlin). It reads a bit academic in content yet so astonishingly clear and readable (my bachelor thesis is jealous).

    I'm very willing to give Fiona Hill (and her co-author) some credit for their field of expertise. I don't think she's claiming to know the future in the linked article, so much as she is emphasising a warning based on years of experience and study. It may not be the "first" warning in the news cycle by far, hence why we may tire of hearing it, but it's still a credible one, imho.

    11 votes
  5. Comment on People are paying millions of dollars for digital pictures of rocks in ~tech

    GreaterPorpoise
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    Not denigrating at all, my initial reaction was only that I wanted to supplement your perspective because I wasn't sure anybody else would've been able to. I was actually very surprised to see...

    Not denigrating at all, my initial reaction was only that I wanted to supplement your perspective because I wasn't sure anybody else would've been able to. I was actually very surprised to see adoptables mentioned as I associate them with a very specific internet demographic I didn't expect to find on Tildes but seeing as we're both here, it's a pleasant surprise.

    This is where I admit the limits of my informed opinion because I didn't actually know adoptables could be resold. So I went to read up what I could about it.

    From what I can tell, common terms for reselling seems to be proper attribution and not selling for a profit (if the adoptable hasn't been changed in a way to add value), which makes me think it's a clause meant to allow people the freedom to "lose interest" in their purchase and recuperate the cost, while allowing some one else to take the creative reins and rights. All again with the assumption that rights are respected.

    Pardon the tangent but it reminds me a little bit of the open source code model, which aims to promote transparency and modification/redistribution, so people can collaborate and improve on the code. The main difference being that artists and resellers seem to prefer being compensated (though if I understand rightly, open source code doesn't automatically mean the end product is free either). And the common thread being that open source developers and artists choose to do this, over keeping their work to themselves or bound to a single fixed private buyer's specifications, because they see the benefits of "passing on the torch" to others in their community. Your code may be suited to you but some one else might use it to meet their own needs. You may not use the adoptable but some one else might do something brilliant with it. So not just assuming the community acknowledges the original rights but giving that good faith back to others.

    And I think that is partially how you maintain the value of the creative rights. If you were stuck with creative rights that you no longer want to exercise, they are then worthless to you and the art itself just sits to "rot" because of the consensus that nobody else will try to claim and modify it when it's still yours. So in that sense, perhaps there is some inherent value speculation there because it's about the added value that a buyer/re-buyer intends to or believes they can achieve when they have the creative rights to the character design. It's a material, an ingredient for non-financial gain (entertainment, roleplay, storytelling, etc), as much as it is a good/commodity to be owned or resold. Once you get or make something from the adoptable, be it a storytelling experience, additional drawings of the same design, a roleplay or social interaction based on your ownership, then you have already gotten additional value from the adoptable, at least in your own eyes.

    Could that be the key difference separating adoptables from NFT art? Or a key similarity? Are bragging rights equivalent to the creative rights of an adoptable?

    I'm not a financial analyst by any means (though I did study it some as part of accounting) but this has been an absolutely fascinating discussion over a comparison I never imagined making before in my life until now. Art and capitalism, always fun to watch when they mix.

    5 votes
  6. Comment on People are paying millions of dollars for digital pictures of rocks in ~tech

    GreaterPorpoise
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    Hi, just to chime here with some belated context (or more like a really deep dive tangent) as a former tween who did dabble in adoptables in the 2010s: The price paid for ownership of an adoptable...
    • Exemplary

    Hi, just to chime here with some belated context (or more like a really deep dive tangent) as a former tween who did dabble in adoptables in the 2010s:

    The price paid for ownership of an adoptable is a form of commission! People paid for an existing or custom character design and the original artist is appropriately compensated and credited for their design work. The roleplaying and whatnot may seem like weird "rights" to sell when it's all virtual but the commission establishes the credit and value from the start while allowing the buyer to continue the chain of creativity freely with whomever they want.

    And yea, it's an honour system. Nothing will actually stop people from reuploading or copying the design closely. And people did exactly that, a LOT and still do because the impact on the original artist is invisible and if the artist even finds out, their options are limited, reliant on the poster or site admin's empathy. (The artist will almost never take any legal copyright action either, unlike Disney or other media companies through Youtube.) It's an unfortunate side effect of technology, a prevailing belief that a downloadable jpg is probably public domain made by Anonymous.

    And it's impactful because in these communities, uncredited art and art labour being massively undervalued (especially by the artists themselves) were and still are huge problems. Firstly, proper attribution means that audiences can find the artist. Audience matters to gaining fans and gaining paying fans matters to paying bills and landing steady gigs with benefits.

    Secondly, when I was in the scene, a lot of amateur (edit: actually, amateur art becomes professional when people pay for it but anyway) art was priced in essentially cents, if it wasn't free. Dollars if you were confident and popular enough. People did it for fun and for the exposure. Maybe that's fine when you're a kid with free time and MS Paint and you're just drawing for your internet friends for shits and giggles. But then you the kid artist, grow up believing that art is supposed to be cheap, even after 10-20 years of drawing experience. I saw an advice post just the other day, from older creatives to younger ones with a pricing formula:

    cost of materials/tools + [hours of labour x minimum wage, at least].

    Minimum wage, because so many are charging less and they're afraid to challenge it. Compare that to what Photoshop costs now, a standard professional artist's tool (albeit now with many free or cheap alternatives). Because Adobe has the opposite problem in pricing themselves.

    I don't know about adoptables specifically anymore but character art and design commissions are an ongoing practice and livelihood, for many freelance and part-time digital artists. Even full-time professional animators, designers and digital artists in established media or gaming companies will struggle with the crunch of deadlines and projects, not only or directly because of this but I think at least in a small part because the time/labour that goes into their work is culturally undervalued. Not to mention carpal tunnel in a field where your hands are your career.

    Now, I understand OP's comparison wasn't implying this at all and I'm super digressing a lot around the topic but I just want this clear in good faith for a publicly viewable discussion: outside of the context of NFTs, paying artists for their digital work, even a purple sparkledog drawn up by a 13-year-old on MS Paint without anybody asking them to, is not in itself a scam if the buyer or market values the art and the labour and experience that went into it.

    For the NFTs, I suspect it's not so much the subjective "art" part as it is the rampant speculation part. Do they actually value what they are receiving or are they paying for hope? And what happens if they run out of hope? I don't know enough to comment beyond that.

    I'll disclose that I have no crypto investments at all but I did once have a deviantArt account and still have a drawing tablet. Thanks for bearing through my impassioned rant.

    10 votes
  7. Comment on What's hard about being non-binary? in ~talk

    GreaterPorpoise
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    edit: I'm so sorry I never noticed for over a year because I just post thoughts into the abyss sometimes but to whoever tagged this as exemplary, thank you for the response, sending you a <3 right...
    • Exemplary

    edit: I'm so sorry I never noticed for over a year because I just post thoughts into the abyss sometimes but to whoever tagged this as exemplary, thank you for the response, sending you a <3 right back and I wish you well.

    update edit: as it turns out, my friend is supportive! We work together and I pointed out the pronouns feature that could be added to our corporate email signatures (at which point she actually acknowledged my pronouns without me having to say anything). We discussed the viability of showing pronouns publicly in our country and culture and initially, we figured it would likely cause confusion and I personally decided against it. But I noticed recently that she's added her own pronouns to her signatures. I'm not sure I could do the same myself but it's a good example of using her cis privilege to be an ally. Feeling very lucky and seen.


    Having to be the one to educate and explain my identity to others. I've been lucky to have close online/long-distance friends who are somewhat attuned to LGBT identities so I can come out and that's that.

    But in real life, being from and living in a conservative country, I have heard nonbinary identities mentioned exactly twice:

    • Local reddit forum where the commenter opined that all nonbinary people appeared to be privileged white women with too little [i.e. too few "real problems"] to worry about.
    • I was discussing Billions (tv show with explicitly nonbinary character who immediately explains their pronouns) with a new friend, the only other LGBTQ person I've ever met, who proceeded to deliberately misgender the character to "keep things simple", moments before I was planning to come out to her. The shock of the misgendering shook my confidence and she didn't hear me in the end.

    Gender identity here is a fringe hot topic, things are still not very open. We don't have any LGBTQ rights or openly activist movements. Being gay/lesbian is socially accepted in a your-business-is-your-own kind of way amongst younger people but it's still illegal (and transgender identities have it far worse, socially). With the older/religious majority, being gay is taboo to the point that politicians actually use sodomy accusations (with alleged video evidence...) to "take down" more liberal opponents.

    My point being, we're still some decades of progress behind more liberal countries. And I don't know if that kind of environment has lowered my expectations and led to my own gender identity being entirely "internal": I present as my assigned gender, I accept all pronouns (though nobody uses anything but she/her) and I'll cringe but identify as a woman in my paperwork.

    It's very very easy to just never come out and I constantly ask myself if I'm presenting as feminine most of the time because that actually suits me or because it gives me less to hide? If I accept all pronouns, does that stop me from being misgendered? (edit: this is pretty similar to what cfabbro said, actually)

    Anyway, I'm going to try coming out to my friend again at some point, this time loudly and explicitly. And I'm worried about how I'll explain being me, with reference to the nonbinary tv character she's been misgendering. I'm worried that she'll misgender me somehow... even though I do accept all pronouns and would ask to keep using she/her around others I'm not out to. I'm worried that she'll think I'm overcomplicating my life, instead of "keeping things simple". I'm worried that because I express my identity differently from the character, that she'll devalidate myself or the character. Or that she'll see us as the same and that the impression and explanation I give will influence her view of all nonbinary identities from here onwards.

    I might not be sure about my identity but I don't want other people to use my uncertainty against me and my journey, or against anybody else.

    So it's just hard to be the one who has to explain it, to be the first nonbinary person that some one meets. Not the worst problem to have, no, but it's my problem all the same.

    20 votes
  8. Comment on Ask Tildes: How do you organize the files on your computer? in ~comp

    GreaterPorpoise
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    I'd be interested to see what people think of my directory structure. It comes as the result of many years of re-organising, never fully satisfactory but I can maintain it, which is the most...

    I'd be interested to see what people think of my directory structure. It comes as the result of many years of re-organising, never fully satisfactory but I can maintain it, which is the most important thing.


    /inbox: the approved mess zone i.e. unsorted downloads and resources. Temporary folders of low importance that I need but will eventually move or delete when done. Contains sync folders, namely megasync and syncthing which I use for:

    • Phone transfer (including selection of books, photos I want to keep on my phone)
    • Phone camera roll
    • Whatsapp

    /codex: also synced to my phone with a ton of ignore patterns and folder exclusions to reduce the size down to primarily plaintext.

    • blog: hosts my wip private blog that I go back to when I feel the urge to code and customise.
    • journal: contains everything I need to function, from to do lists, shopping lists, calendars, password manager database, finance records, health tracking. Almost everything here is in a format I can read and edit on both my PC and phone.
    • projects:
      • art catch-all folder: sorted by topic/subject matter, each piece has a wip folder and reference folder with final versions kept in the project root.
      • writing subfolders: for each titled project, with subsubfolders for notes on characters, setting, plot, research, etc. My personal haven.
    • work: like projects but specific to professional or educational obligations IE boring shit. Actual work happens on a secured work laptop, in a folder structure that suits the people I work for.
    • notes: knowledge base of various topics, most notably my accounting notes and my linux documentation and cheatsheets. Everything else is a scanned image (e.g. cookbook recipes) or in old evernote databases, maybe someday I'll get around to converting them all into neat markdown but it's an ambitious undertaking I've been putting off for years.

    /media: music collection and other fun things. I run a local media server (minidlna) to stream to our phones or tv, samba share to handle books.


    /data: Not synced and never will be, ideally. Photo albums, backups, mailboxes, and softcopy of important records and documents. Thinking about it now, perhaps photo albums should be moved to media as a samba share...


    /home: I keep my personal data (above) in a big separate partition, and reserve /home for program installations, namely games and some scripts. Learnt to do this back on Windows, because C: drive is a mess, but it makes sense on Linux too.

    3 votes
  9. Comment on What's the longest running quandary/debate you've had with yourself? in ~talk

    GreaterPorpoise
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    I hope coming out at work goes well for you! Unfortunately, the work culture (or culture, fullstop) here isn't so developed so I don't expect to come out publicly, just to people I'm close to,...

    I hope coming out at work goes well for you! Unfortunately, the work culture (or culture, fullstop) here isn't so developed so I don't expect to come out publicly, just to people I'm close to, which is enough for my own sense of self and happiness. I'm happy to move on if I don't have a friend's acceptance, but it's harder if moving on is less feasible, like with SOs or family whose lives are tangled up in yours. If you don't mind my asking, how is your relationship with your parents and brother now?

    What you said does ring true though, it takes less for tension to escalate into outright conflict between myself and my parents. I think keeping such big secrets stirs up resentment and bitterness because it's so one-sided. Not to mention hinder the natural development/maturation? of relationships because you're actively working to keep your side of it the same. Being closeted always exacts a higher cost than it seems. I don't know that this has given me an answer to my dilemma but I've got a lot to think about, thank you for listening and sharing.

    3 votes
  10. Comment on What's the longest running quandary/debate you've had with yourself? in ~talk

    GreaterPorpoise
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    Thank you for listening and for making this thread! I wasn't expecting a definitive answer to my quandary, but I think writing and laying it all out helped put some things in perspective.

    Thank you for listening and for making this thread! I wasn't expecting a definitive answer to my quandary, but I think writing and laying it all out helped put some things in perspective.

    3 votes
  11. Comment on What's the longest running quandary/debate you've had with yourself? in ~talk

    GreaterPorpoise
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    As non-binary, not at all. But I hate the prospect of lying about my church attendance and non-heterosexual relationships for the rest of my parents' lifetimes. I want to give myself a chance of...

    As non-binary, not at all. But I hate the prospect of lying about my church attendance and non-heterosexual relationships for the rest of my parents' lifetimes. I want to give myself a chance of acceptance, give them a chance to prove their love is the unconditional kind.

    The thing stopping me is the non-zero chance that there's no acceptance at all, waiting on the other side of coming out and ensuing adjustment period. It's worth it if there is, but if not, the relationship will be worse off with nothing gained for anybody.

    Some one described being closeted as having Schödinger's parental love, and that's true here for the whole relationship. I'd describe it as having great potential to be healthy and wholesome, and equally great potential to be unhealthy and toxic.

    It used to be abusive, so some days, I feel like a victim who needs to cut them off so I can start healing. Other days, I am too full of love and affection to even imagine not having them in my life. I don't really know what option is healthiest for me.

    (As some added context, I am an only child in a culture where it is customary to look after your parents in their old age, at least financially. I know they're not entitled to it, but I plan to do this no matter what. It feels irresponsible and unnecessary to leave them in poverty, if I have the means to look after them, even at a distance).

    7 votes
  12. Comment on What's the longest running quandary/debate you've had with yourself? in ~talk

    GreaterPorpoise
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    None of this will be new to anybody else who's had to come out, but I've been debating whether to tell my parents (in order of acceptability) that I'm bi/pansexual, non-binary and an atheist. If I...

    None of this will be new to anybody else who's had to come out, but I've been debating whether to tell my parents (in order of acceptability) that I'm bi/pansexual, non-binary and an atheist.

    If I do, how much do I tell, how do I explain it and when? Or if I don't, how can I keep hiding it, permanently or just until I change my mind? It's a question that I can only escape by coming out, but I can't take anything back once I do.

    Pros of coming out:

    • closure in knowing where I stand and that I did all I could
    • confrontation opens the path for resolution and reconciliation if any
    • able to rebuild and move onto whatever's next
    • a potentially stronger, healthier, positive relationship built on truth and acceptance, or failing that, on honesty and boundaries at least
    • can live my life more freely without secrets from them, either with acceptance or with distance

    Cons:

    • the emotional fallout and relationship strain is a (temporary but intense) burden for everybody
    • the possibility that the relationship may never be positive again or that past (forgiven-ish) abuses and attempts to control me may resurface
    • the reputation damage and possible alienation for myself and my family due to:
    • widespread lack of support in this non-western culture
    • they might forgive my sexuality and gender, but the atheism may disrupt their own faith and sense of purpose in life, with the possibility they may never bounce back

    I've been caught in this loop for a few years now. I love them so much even if they drive me up the wall. i've been leaning towards telling them when I've established my own separate household, but sometimes, I feel the impulse to tell them everything in moments of frustration or sometimes, the urge to just escape to a new life and never tell them anything but the bare minimum to spare all of us some heartache.

    Maybe there's something about the situation that I'm missing.

    10 votes