Loire's recent activity

  1. Comment on It's a great time to be an American in ~misc

    Loire
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    I'd like to believe (but who knows) that American democracy isn't yet at Russian levels of complete fraud. If a significant majority shows up to the polls (and some experts were predicting a...

    The beauty of electoral fraud is that it doesn't really matter if people show up to polls en-mass if the results are easily manipulated.

    I'd like to believe (but who knows) that American democracy isn't yet at Russian levels of complete fraud. If a significant majority shows up to the polls (and some experts were predicting a record turnout pre-Corona) the results will be undeniable.

    Generally true for the Senate, but not necessarily for anything else thanks to heavy gerrymandering. My cursory glance through the 2016 results of many states is that while Hillary had a slight dip in turnout relative to 2012 Obama, Trump brought in tons more voters in huge numbers (in the few states that matter).

    The 2012 election year was a bit of a down year for turnout. It's better to compare between 2008 and 2016 where the voting population increased by 21 million Americans and the turnout only increased by 7 million for a decrease of 3%.

    Hillary was an unquestionably bad candidate not only due to her own failures, but due to two decades of consistent character assasination by the Republican party. She encouraged absolutely no one to show up to the polls.Trump on the other hand tapped into the deplorable Republican base in a way an actually respectable candidate like Romney never could.

    In a normal election, I would confidently be predicting a Biden landslide. With Corona virus scaring Democrats more than Republicans, I don't know what to think anymore. Voter suppression certainly isn't good for the Democrats no matter how you look at it.

    4 votes
  2. Comment on It's a great time to be an American in ~misc

    Loire
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    Americans need to show up and vote. Irregardless of the threat of COVID. Irregardless of conservative electoral fraud making the endeavour uncomfortable. The higher the voter turnout the more...

    Americans need to show up and vote. Irregardless of the threat of COVID. Irregardless of conservative electoral fraud making the endeavour uncomfortable. The higher the voter turnout the more inevitable a Democratic win.

    The Republicans will attempt to steal this election. Trump will attempt to steal this election. Certain foreign nations will attempt to steal this election. If Americans don't show up to the polls en masse, then the electoral fraud will likely succeed.

    There are a ton of obstacles on the horizon for just democracy, let alone "progress", even if ignoring the Democrat's inevitable infighting. Everything is stacked against the voters this election.

    6 votes
  3. Comment on Do Americans understand how badly they’re doing? in ~health.coronavirus

    Loire
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    At this point, as worried as I am about it, I do wonder about how likely a full blown depression is. The rest of the developed world has the disease relatively under control and the vast majority...

    At this point, as worried as I am about it, I do wonder about how likely a full blown depression is. The rest of the developed world has the disease relatively under control and the vast majority of the population is asymptomatic. The job numbers, although I am vaguely suspicious of number fudging, are also promising. As important as the US is to the global economy, if everyone else is back to relative business as usual, and with the US ignoring the problem and forcing people in into work anyways, I don't see a full blown depression forming. Especially since the markets have become completely detached from reality. Likewise most of the people that do get seriously ill are unlikely to be employed due to age, nor in important jobs anyways.

    I am by no means an expert in this but the threat of a depression seems to have passed for now.

    4 votes
  4. Comment on Do Americans understand how badly they’re doing? in ~health.coronavirus

    Loire
    (edited )
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    American conservatives have an incredible capacity for not acknowledging anything that doesn't personally and directly affect them. I'd like to think even they might start considering it at some...

    American conservatives have an incredible capacity for not acknowledging anything that doesn't personally and directly affect them.

    I'd like to think even they might start considering it at some major marker like half a million dead but deep down I know even that won't jar them from their stupor. Until every single American gets infected with the resultant symptomatic toll, there will be snapping out of it.

    9 votes
  5. Comment on Black Lives Matter may be the largest movement in US history in ~news

    Loire
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    That first article is particularly bad. The fact that an educated (presumedly from his pen name) Romanophile saw Trump as the least bad option is a testament to American intellectual...

    That first article is particularly bad. The fact that an educated (presumedly from his pen name) Romanophile saw Trump as the least bad option is a testament to American intellectual pigheadedness. There are so many examples of Trump-like figures tied to the decline of the Roman Republic and the empire. He is the perfect image of every reactionary populist in human history.

    There is literally no excuse, looking at Clinton vs Trump, and coming away thinking Donald is the better option but for having your mind drenched in the American conservative miasma

    6 votes
  6. Comment on Researchers at Cornell University concluded that an online semester would result in more COVID-19 in ~health.coronavirus

    Loire
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    That's... Not how any of this works. You can't read a little bit of a research paper and come to a conclusion, especially not starting at the start when papers don't reach the actual valuable...

    I haven't read all 54 pages of this paper, but I've read enough to convince me that the conclusion this article tries to draw from it is horseshit.

    That's... Not how any of this works. You can't read a little bit of a research paper and come to a conclusion, especially not starting at the start when papers don't reach the actual valuable information until at least half way through. The guts of this paper don't even start until page 31. You can read over half of this work and not even touch the actual research.

    That's not critical thinking, that's your biases making decisions for you.

    I too am only about 19 pages in, and personally disagree with the concept of in person class this fall, but I am not going to come onto the internet and decry the whole thing as foul without having even tagged up with the On Going Work Section.

    That is academically dishonest.

    There are 5 PhD students and 3 faculty members listed as authors.

    I'm not sure what your implication is here. That's really about average for University level research. In six months I put together 67 pages developing a new petrophysical technique, using nothing but an unrelated equation from Marie Currie, by myself, with one supervisor. While, yes the importance was significantly lower, that doesn't change that "x amount of graduates and y amount of Proffessors" is not a criticism.

    Aww, that's cute. They think a bunch of 18-22 year olds, after spending an entire summer under quarantine, will head off to college and maintain perfect discipline.

    Literally all hypotheses comprise of a number of pre-determined suppositions. We can't control every single variable in the system. This is perfectly normal for research.

    "Flatten the curve" was dependant on people universally not simply getting bored of the lockdowns and risking their own lives to go to the gym. Mask wearing was dependant on masks not becoming somehow politicized. Neither of those presumptions worked out for us huh? But they are still valuable hypotheses.

    I find it interesting, although unsurprising, that the typically "trust the science" tildes doesn't even attempt to trust the science when it opposes their general beliefs and biases. I understand we aren't all former graduates but there should be the expectation of at least making it through the actual paper.

    13 votes
  7. Comment on Reclaiming Indian food from the white gaze in ~food

    Loire
    (edited )
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    You don't see how this absolutist statement can easily be turned around? It's intellectually dishonest to equate the content with this article to the current ongoing battle against institutional...

    Some people will interpret any criticism as an attack because they're so accustomed to living in a world that caters to them that any pushback feels like hostility.

    You don't see how this absolutist statement can easily be turned around?

    It's intellectually dishonest to equate the content with this article to the current ongoing battle against institutional racism or to assume anyone who calls out the article yearns to maintain the world of white privilege.


    Coming through highschool and college in Canada I had numerous good Nigerian and one Ethiopian friends. They were ecstatic to share their meals and culture with me, to run interpretation duty on African menus, to invite me to their cultural events and parties. Perhaps that was partly some cultural obligation, but they seemed genuinely excited about it. I learned from them, happily about their culture, and they seemed more than excited to pass that information along. I was never criticized because I prefered this dish over that one. I was never criticized for mispronouncing something from their cultural heritage. They were genuinely over joyed to share it with me. And I was happy to share with them what meagre culture Canadianshave, ceasers, hockey and maple syrup. You know what? I learnt a fucking lot that way.

    But ever since I have moved to America, and I admit this is partially about the recent timing, it's a whole other world. A not insignificant number of black people see me as their oppressor. Everything seems mentally segregated. The one black friend I have been able to make outright tells me that she "doesn't usually like white people". Thats the type of thing I have never in my life heard from any minority prior to moving here. Many black friendships I attempt to make are apparently unviable. It's like there is two different worlds. You do your thing and we'll do ours. Do I understand what causes these problems? For sure.

    To swing this anecdote into a an actual point:

    Had I not grown up with the exposure I did how would I ever have learnt a fucking thing? If I had grown up in this shithole of a country would I have had the shared cultural experiences I recieved? I doubt it. America apparently doesn't do that.

    Your "white discomfort" might feel right but it drives a wedge and further divides the population. This hard knocks education of actively attacking normal white people (I'm not going to pretend like we don't have an active racist population that deserves violent reprisal) from every direction (edit: Especially for things that you turn around and say it's perfectly okay for minorities to do) isn't going to garner the results you want.

    I'm sorry but it just won't.

    /u/JackA is mostly right (not everyone deserves good treatment): When you attack people for something as trivial as trying to share and partake in your culture you will push them away and harden them against what they really need to hear about structural racism in this nation.

    1 vote
  8. Comment on Introducing Worms Rumble - A real-time, 32-player Worms game with deathmatch, last worm standing, and battle royale modes in ~games

    Loire
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    The holy hand grenade is shown at the end of the trailer.

    The holy hand grenade is shown at the end of the trailer.

    2 votes
  9. Comment on Reclaiming Indian food from the white gaze in ~food

    Loire
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    Thank rhetorical god for that. Although, with how little I consume dairy I might just trade lactose tolerance for some Laal Maas or ordering off the "Non-white person" spice scale at my local...

    Thank rhetorical god for that.

    Although, with how little I consume dairy I might just trade lactose tolerance for some Laal Maas or ordering off the "Non-white person" spice scale at my local Korean restaurant.

    1 vote
  10. Comment on Reclaiming Indian food from the white gaze in ~food

    Loire
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    Even for those of us who grew up eating non-bland foods age can cause a turn for the worst. I have eaten heavy amounts of spices, and was accustomed to high levels of capsaicin, my entire life....

    Even for those of us who grew up eating non-bland foods age can cause a turn for the worst. I have eaten heavy amounts of spices, and was accustomed to high levels of capsaicin, my entire life. Then, somewhere around 29-30, I just couldn't take it anymore. Now everytime I get heavily spiced food I am paying for it the next morning. European genetics are absolutely ruining my ability to enjoy good foods.

    2 votes
  11. Comment on Reclaiming Indian food from the white gaze in ~food

  12. Comment on Reclaiming Indian food from the white gaze in ~food

    Loire
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    The author spends significantly more time writing about her white, or non-south Asian acquaintances, and various imperceptible cultural slights while enjoying her culture's food than she does...

    The author spends significantly more time writing about her white, or non-south Asian acquaintances, and various imperceptible cultural slights while enjoying her culture's food than she does about white restaraunters cooking Indian dishes.

    2 votes
  13. Comment on Reclaiming Indian food from the white gaze in ~food

    Loire
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    I'm not sure where you are discerning offense taken, but I assure you that's really not the case. It's vaguely dishonest (or as tildes prefers "in bad faith") to imply that because I (and numerous...

    I'm not sure where you are discerning offense taken, but I assure you that's really not the case.

    It's vaguely dishonest (or as tildes prefers "in bad faith") to imply that because I (and numerous other posters in this thread) find the author's opinion to be needlessly divisive, and maybe a little gatekeep-y, that I am taking offense.

    If this was an opinion piece members of tildes generally disagree with, say a right wing think piece of some sort, would you be implying their criticism is invalid because they seem to be taking offense?

    4 votes
  14. Comment on Reclaiming Indian food from the white gaze in ~food

    Loire
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    It was in reply to the parent level comment semi implying Anthony Bourdain made eating good food cool for white people. It can't "stop being self-deprecating" simple through repetition especially...

    I'm not sure where the parent comment or the source article made this assumption -- as a white American from the rural South I did not read that assumption in either text, but I might've missed something.

    It was in reply to the parent level comment semi implying Anthony Bourdain made eating good food cool for white people.

    I think the problem with this kind of "relating" is that, when someone hears it all the time, it stops being funny or self-deprecating pretty quickly.

    It can't "stop being self-deprecating" simple through repetition especially when that repetition is through multiple different people. If it's intended to mock one self that is exactly what it is, irregardless of how tired the joke is. We have a responsibility to not find harm where it is not intended.

    It's also difficult to take as a joke when the same people who make this kind of self-deprecating humor also make fun of, or belittle, mock, jeer at, or even physically harm you just for aspects of yourself you can't change, like skin color or cultural background.

    There is no indication the older women in question did this. Indeed, with the exception of the very off handed mention of childhood bullying there is no indication anywhere in the article that this woman has had this occur to her.

    I've heard some about Viet-Cajun food, though I haven't had any; I think that the outrage is missing because there is no attempt to erase the Cajun-ness of the food. It is a pure sharing expression of cultural melding, and that is beautiful.

    With all due respect you are literally just justifying it because it isn't being done by white people. Viet-Cajun food isn't Cajun food. It's a fusion that takes elements of Cajun cuisine and hybridizes it with Vietnamese because of the similiarities. Part of it is literally Vietnamese people saying crawfish are better cooked in Vietnamese style than New Orleans style. It is literally one culture taking another culture's cuisine and adapting it to their own preferences. It is the exact same as the author's complaints of white chefs cooking Indian cuisine.

    But you are right. It is beautiful. Because this is what food is supposed to be.

    The problem that I think the author is coming up against is how white people, because of the background of colonialism and neocolonialism that we*'re barely conscious of much of the time, because we're steeped in it and it benefits us, do tend to erase people of color's contributions to our own cuisine.

    While I'm sure examples of this have occurred, we really don't. When it comes to cuisine people by-and-large prefer "authentic" foreign cuisine (it's usually not actually authentic, but that's beyond the point), and that fully extends to the race of the kitchen staff. Nobody says "Hey let's go to that Sichuan Chinese restaurant run by a white guy". Nobody prefers halal served up by an Irishman. Nobody goes to an Indian restaurant, sees the white chef and thinks "yes this is exactly what I want". Cuisine is possibly the last place minority erasure occurs, it is the one place where nearly every culture worldwide is celebrated, and where, as I said, "authenticity" is prized.

    I took the piece as one of frustration, that the author has felt this way for much of her life, through no fault of her own; and as a way to write about reclaiming heritage through cooking by embracing her own cuisine and showing it to others without apology.

    I got a strong sense that her parents explicitly failed to share their cultural heritage with her (especially concerning food). There may be a better argument their about the harm caused by colonialism, concerning why they knowingly or unknowingly didn't want to impart that culture.

    4 votes
  15. Comment on Reclaiming Indian food from the white gaze in ~food

    Loire
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    It's just such incredibly divisive rheyoric over something that is meant to be shared.

    It's just such incredibly divisive rheyoric over something that is meant to be shared.

    8 votes
  16. Comment on Reclaiming Indian food from the white gaze in ~food

    Loire
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    I really wish "whiteness" wasn't automatically associated with rural and/or ignorant white Americans. Most of us growing up in an urban center didn't suddenly turn on to something other than...

    I really wish "whiteness" wasn't automatically associated with rural and/or ignorant white Americans. Most of us growing up in an urban center didn't suddenly turn on to something other than salted roast beef and mashed potatoes because Anthony Bourdain told us it was cool.

    To be honest with you, I've read this article a few times now and I must be missing the point. To be frank this assertion that an innocuous comment by a white lady about her indigestion othered the author is frankly ridiculous and the some of the worst excess of victimization culture imaginable. The joke is, and has always been on white people and our lack of culinary adventurism for as long as I have been alive. It's almost instictual self deprecation at this point. The woman was trying to relate to the author through her culture. Does the author think she is the only one to have stained her own braces or set off her apartment's fire alarm? To attach cultural stigma to all these benign, fairly common place issues is asinine.

    To assert that only white restaraunters are allowed to dabble in other cultures might have some credence if the author lived in Madison, but to claim from Manhattan that only white chefs are working with alternative and hybrid cuisines? And to assert that white New Yorkers prefer to eat at white owned, foreign cuisine? Absolutely absurd.

    Gee, how terrible for the Indian culture that Ghee has become popular.

    Even in Houston I have never had Indian food that wasn't prepared by an Indian (or possibly Bengali or Pakistani). Do you think my local taco truck is run by a white person? Where is the outrage that Vietnamese immigrants have absolutely dominated and perfected Cajun cuisine in this region?

    There is no complaint because food, more than any other cultural item, is meant to be shared. It's how we gather, a centerpiece for socialization, and to bring people together. It's how we sustain eachother and make others happy. Food is an ambassador for cultures, and frankly I thought it was the one thing we could all agree to leave untouched from the gaze of cultural appropriation.

    Ask any (authentic or otherwise) non-white chef if they want to cook exclusively for their own racial sub-group, what do you think their answer will be? Do you think they care as long as their food is apreciated, and brings happiness? Do you think they feel othered by white people eating their traditional meals?

    Seriously what are we supposed to take away from this piece? That some people are so ready to be victimized that they allow the thought of other races enjoying their food to other them and alienate them from their culture?

    11 votes
  17. Comment on After previously announcing they would drop two of the game's three modes, Amazon's free-to-play shooter Crucible is now "un-launching" and going back to closed beta in ~games

    Loire
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    Game design is hard. AAA-Game design especially so. Amazon has the resources to push and pull this game out of release as many times as it so chooses, and if it's committed to entering the gaming...

    Game design is hard. AAA-Game design especially so. Amazon has the resources to push and pull this game out of release as many times as it so chooses, and if it's committed to entering the gaming market (since what industry is Amazon willing to leave untouched at this point), then scrapping Crucible is not an ideal direction to take. This is valuable experience for the company.

    Not to mention reversing a games release has worked spectacularely in the past..

    7 votes
  18. Comment on McGrath wins close Kentucky Senate primary in ~news

    Loire
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    Remember they are moving into the general in Kentucky. There's a huge difference in how progressive values appeal to Democrats and how they will appeal to the average Kentuckian (read:...

    Remember they are moving into the general in Kentucky. There's a huge difference in how progressive values appeal to Democrats and how they will appeal to the average Kentuckian (read: conservative).

    Common sense would say "no" McGrath does not take a more progressive stance but I'm sure her team have a better pulse on what will work in Kentucky then either of us.

    11 votes
  19. Comment on [WARNING - transphobia] Gender critical has been banned - here are some links I’ve collected in ~test

    Loire
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    What on the hell is going on with tildes lately? I go into self exile and it's predominantly socialists and I come back a month later to find terfs and some unusually right slanted opinions all...

    What on the hell is going on with tildes lately? I go into self exile and it's predominantly socialists and I come back a month later to find terfs and some unusually right slanted opinions all over the place?

    Is there some sort of campaign in process?

    3 votes
  20. Comment on I cannot recommend The Newsroom enough. in ~tv

    Loire
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    After the first season aired Sorkin was criticized relentlessly for being biased and preachy. Although I don't think it's been confirmed, I always assumed that was the cause for the writing gap...

    After the first season aired Sorkin was criticized relentlessly for being biased and preachy. Although I don't think it's been confirmed, I always assumed that was the cause for the writing gap between season 1 and season 2.

    Go back and watch that first season, compare the overarching message vis-a-vis the direction of the Republican party and tell me it was too preachy.

    2 votes