NeoTheFox's recent activity

  1. Comment on Which smartphone and carrier are you using? (USA only) in ~tech

    NeoTheFox Link
    Blackberry KEYone and Yota. That was the only keyboard phone on the market, I'm looking to upgrade to F(x)tec 1 when that comes out. Yota offers the best internet plan where I live - unlimited +...

    Blackberry KEYone and Yota.
    That was the only keyboard phone on the market, I'm looking to upgrade to F(x)tec 1 when that comes out. Yota offers the best internet plan where I live - unlimited + 300 mines and really cheap, I love it.

    3 votes
  2. Comment on We are back at square one of personal messaging in ~tech

    NeoTheFox Link Parent
    Yup, only after wide WhatsApp, Telegram and Viber adoption telcos here managed to get unlimited SMS messages to plans, before that it was charged per-SMS, and even now when I have an option to get...

    Yup, only after wide WhatsApp, Telegram and Viber adoption telcos here managed to get unlimited SMS messages to plans, before that it was charged per-SMS, and even now when I have an option to get them there is no reason for me to do so, since it involves paying extra, and even from my included 300 minutes I'm barely using 10 per month, since I often call people via Telegram instead. Not only it is more secure, you also get to call people from your PC or laptop.

    1 vote
  3. Comment on Light themes or Dark themes? in ~tech

    NeoTheFox Link
    One of the reasons I like Tildes is the dark theme. Not just a dark theme, Solarized! All my devices have it installed, and I'm using it everywhere it's available. I really love it.

    One of the reasons I like Tildes is the dark theme. Not just a dark theme, Solarized! All my devices have it installed, and I'm using it everywhere it's available. I really love it.

    5 votes
  4. Comment on New mod for bsnes emulator makes “Mode 7” SNES games look like new in ~games

    NeoTheFox Link
    Now they look like they are made with GZDoom engine, amazing improvement over source material! That makes this emulator better than the official ones like Switch's classics or 3DS virtual console...

    Now they look like they are made with GZDoom engine, amazing improvement over source material! That makes this emulator better than the official ones like Switch's classics or 3DS virtual console or NES/SNES minis.

    6 votes
  5. Comment on We Need to Get Ready for GamerGate Politicians in ~misc

    NeoTheFox (edited ) Link
    I think it's fair to link Carl's response to a very similar article from BuzzFeed, where most of the same bullet points about him is addressed. If you have read the article I suggest you hear his...

    I think it's fair to link Carl's response to a very similar article from BuzzFeed, where most of the same bullet points about him is addressed. If you have read the article I suggest you hear his side of the story.

    2 votes
  6. Comment on We are back at square one of personal messaging in ~tech

    NeoTheFox Link Parent
    Not for Viber, but Telegram is open-source and mtproto documentation is available. It's a part of the reason why I consider Telegram a good compromise, even with its server side closed. But I...

    the real point is that anybody can create a new email or IRC client. That is not true of Telegram or Viber.

    Not for Viber, but Telegram is open-source and mtproto documentation is available. It's a part of the reason why I consider Telegram a good compromise, even with its server side closed. But I agree, federation is a good feature, however here we have a huge gap between the interests of common people and more tech-savy people. The goal of an IM protocol is to keep people connected, and if it fails to attract a critical mass of people it would never take off. Sadly we don't live in a world where people read the EULAs and care about data collection, monetization practices, invasive ads, etc, as long as the service is free. This puts any IM that has transparency, openness and security on a forefront at a disadvantage before IMs that appeal to a more general audience that prefer photo filters, video calls, animated emojiis and so on. At this point we can't even define clearly what is a must have feature for an IM and what isn't. Chinese users of WeChat enjoy instant money transfers and shops via the IM, is it necessary for a protocol to support this? And if not what would happen when WhatsApp introduces its own payment system? And when Telegram's TON comes around?
    Same thing with video calls and audio messages. Are they have to exist in the protocol? Who gets to store them? And so on and so on. And while on one hand it's easy to install an extra app people very much prefer to keep everything within one single app, and it's understandable. I really think we would be forced to go through the multi-client phase again before it gets better.

  7. Comment on We are back at square one of personal messaging in ~tech

    NeoTheFox Link Parent
    Sounds like you are 5-6 years younger than me then, but memories-wise I had a similar experience to you - just replace all the US locations with Eastern Europe ones and outlet with a place where...

    Sounds like you are 5-6 years younger than me then, but memories-wise I had a similar experience to you - just replace all the US locations with Eastern Europe ones and outlet with a place where bloody GPRS would let you log into Jimm. I still am in touch with some of the people from my original contact list, some on Steam, some on Telegram, some via Jabber. It's really interesting how something that seems like minor protocol/pricing differences may shape the whole way of communication for people.

    2 votes
  8. Comment on We are back at square one of personal messaging in ~tech

    NeoTheFox Link Parent
    Well modern IMs like Telegram or Viber have a lot of features that are quite server-heavy. Compared to Email or IRC one Telegram message could waste as much bandwidth as a whole IRC chatroom would...

    Well modern IMs like Telegram or Viber have a lot of features that are quite server-heavy. Compared to Email or IRC one Telegram message could waste as much bandwidth as a whole IRC chatroom would in a day - take video message for example. To support such infrastructure you have to spend a lot of money, and we have to figure out where that money would come if we'll go into federated mode for example. Jabber servers were numerous and free because they never took any noticeable resources and could be run from somebody's basement, but if tomorrow Telegram opens the server side you wouldn't be able to host even 10 people comfortably on a personal server. IMO sooner or later when all these chats would grow to a point where they have nowhere to grow they would be force to cooperate somehow. In a federated network we would much more likely have to deal with ads or paid membership. Mastodon is a good example - even now some servers are on a pay-per-registration basis, and it would only get further from there. Email is good, but nothing about it is instant. DeltaChat is a good idea, but I'm yet to see it in action sadly.

    2 votes
  9. Comment on We are back at square one of personal messaging in ~tech

    NeoTheFox Link Parent
    Oh yea, our perspectives differ that much because of regional difference, we had a GSM network here in eastern Europe, and the cellular phones were adopted very fast, with GSM network came...

    Oh yea, our perspectives differ that much because of regional difference, we had a GSM network here in eastern Europe, and the cellular phones were adopted very fast, with GSM network came GPRS/WAP internet access, and most providers would have you pay per 1MB of data. The j2me phones came before the QWERTY phones, but maybe they weren't as popular where you lived, since the idea that a laptop would be more accessible to someone than a j2me phone sounds pretty wild to me. Probably because wide adoption of cellphones came a bit late, and people were buying j2me capable phones as their first phones, my first phone lasted me more than 6 years. Also I think that 5CAD/month is a factor, since subscription based service was not common at all here back then, and that meant everyone had internet on a phone by default, you would get charged for it after you'll use it, not before. To put it into perspective, ICQ was text-only, with added emojis if your client supported them. This meant that with a very heavy chatting you'll get to 1, maybe 1.5MB per day, and that was super-affordable. Basically you could chat for a week non-stop for a price of 1-2 SMS messages. Skype, on the other hand, came much later, and it was much, much more internet-hungry. And this is what pushed even regular people to seek help setting up Jimm on their phones, some cellphone stores had it as a paid service.
    Also I have to mention that j2me phones were not smartphones, and they mostly were single-task devices, meaning that you had to keep Jimm open. Some high-end phones could allow j2me apps to run in the background, usually one at a time, and unlike smartphones they wouldn't randomly kill it. Jimm evolved pretty heavily, in order to help people who had to log out of it every time they wanted to make a call or listen to music Jimm got in-app phone capabilities, allowing you to make calls from Jimm itself. MSN never took off here for whatever reason, most likely because it wasn't pre-installed.

    2 votes
  10. Comment on We are back at square one of personal messaging in ~tech

    NeoTheFox Link Parent
    Not to mention that people who used Nokia phones before Microsoft took over were using libpurpble-based messenger, that used to be the only one IM available to them (with exception of Skype on...

    Not to mention that people who used Nokia phones before Microsoft took over were using libpurpble-based messenger, that used to be the only one IM available to them (with exception of Skype on later models), and thanks to this you can use these phones with modern IMs supported by libpurple to this day.

    1 vote
  11. Comment on We are back at square one of personal messaging in ~tech

    NeoTheFox (edited ) Link Parent
    It's different all around the world, sure, but here is what happened where I live - SMS were expensive, and a lot of people used ICQ to chat with each other on PCs. However ICQ themselves had the...

    The way the OP is written makes it seem like bridge clients became the defacto standard when for me that wasn't the case at all.

    It's different all around the world, sure, but here is what happened where I live - SMS were expensive, and a lot of people used ICQ to chat with each other on PCs. However ICQ themselves had the worst client imaginable - laggy, infested with ads and resource-heavy. But there were a lot of custom ICQ clients, most popular of them being QiP, and that's what a lot of people used. When everyone got phones capable of having j2me apps installed, an app called "Jimm" came around, another unofficial ICQ client that took it by storm - now you could just have it on your phone and be in touch with people on ICQ, without having to pay for SMS messages. So people who had never used ICQ started installing Jimm on their phones, just to get that "better SMS experience", and all these new Jimm users were installing QiP on their PCs, since nobody in their mind on Jimm would not recommend an official ICQ client. QiP quickly got a wind of what's going on and introduced a new version with a "QiP" account, that would create a "multi-account" for people on first log in into ICQ, and that multi-account was a custom XMPP server with an ability to find your ICQ contacts and add them to your friendlist in QiP. This allowed them to extend the functionality of QiP client with things that ICQ couldn't do, between people on a new QiP client a chat would open via XMPP without them being completely aware that they aren't using ICQ anymore, and with a QiP account came their email, cloud and all other things. So their strategy worked - they got a lot of people that started out with mobile to use their platform, and they carried over some existing users as well. Later they launched their own mobile client "QiP Mobile", capable of communicating with multi-account QiP users and based on Jimm source code. That's where smartphone revolution happened, and people buying smartphones found themselves without any good means to use ICQ or QiP accounts anymore, since new operating systems Android and iOS would put your phone into a sleep mode a background application would not be able to stay connected. Both XMPP (which QiP was based on) and ICQ rewired constant connection to the server to stay online, else the messages would not get delivered unless you open the app and connect to the network again. That left every smartphone user with two options - either use GTalk, that also was XMPP based and an ICQ transport with your GTalk account to stay in touch with ICQ people, or get a half-working ICQ/XMPP client to constantly deal with frustration of randomly dropping offline and battery drain due to inability to sleep. It took too long for these protocols to catch on and deal with these flaws so they got replaced with social networks rather quickly, but for some time XMPP was king. These days QiP is basically dead, both the client and the portal, ICQ changed hands who knows how many times, and now it has a decent mobile client, but it lost most of its userbase.

    6 votes
  12. Comment on We are back at square one of personal messaging in ~tech

    NeoTheFox Link Parent
    I prefer Telegram, because while it's not perfect and has a closed-source server side it's the best IM feature-wise, and the client is open. It's also easy for me to put some trust into Durov, and...

    I prefer Telegram, because while it's not perfect and has a closed-source server side it's the best IM feature-wise, and the client is open. It's also easy for me to put some trust into Durov, and I like the whole user-oriented feel of it. All these things are making people register and use Telegram themselves, without me, "the geek guy" having to constantly pedal my "geeky" apps to people that nobody uses. In an ideal world Matrix would be more widespread, but since without anyone to talk to IMs are pointless it's the best compromise I have.

    2 votes
  13. Comment on We are back at square one of personal messaging in ~tech

    NeoTheFox Link Parent
    Lucky you, here where I live SMS are not free, and to get unlimited play I have to pay a noticeable premium over my current plan that has unlimited internet and 300 minutes of voice. And I can't...

    Lucky you, here where I live SMS are not free, and to get unlimited play I have to pay a noticeable premium over my current plan that has unlimited internet and 300 minutes of voice. And I can't assume people who I am in touch with are available via SMS either, because most plans are paid on a subscription basis, and if you have your credit card linked to your provider it would only credit you with a monthly fee, so often I end up with a 0 phone balance without an option to send a paid SMS.

    I think what is different here about modern IMs is the update frequency. Old multi-protocol messengers relied on a notion that any given protocol had to be set in stone because not everyone would be able to upgrade right away if the company wants to change something, but now all it takes is a push to Play Store/App Store for the app to update almost instantly for most users. So if you are going to make a multi-protocol client you would have to deal with constant breakage of your software due to back-end changes.

    8 votes
  14. I can't shake the dejavu feeling I'm getting using any kind of messaging these days. Today we have an awful lot of messaging apps, that are all roughly the same, with similar features - Signal,...

    I can't shake the dejavu feeling I'm getting using any kind of messaging these days. Today we have an awful lot of messaging apps, that are all roughly the same, with similar features - Signal, Telegram, WhatsApp, Riot, etc. This happened once already, at the dawn of 200X IM revolution that deprecated SMS for good we also had MSN, ICQ, GTalk, Jabber, etc. This also was a set of very similar personal messaging clients and protocols, similar in any way to each other. It all changed when the multi-protocol messaging apps came out - Pidgin, QiP, Miranda and others made it easy to gather all your contacts from various protocols in one place and to keep in touch with everyone. Shortly after Jabber transports were made so you could congregate all other accounts into one single XMPP account. Even N900 that came out in 2009 had the ability to gather various accounts into one single contact list.
    I feel like right now with all the segmented IM apps it's a good time for something like this to happen again, and Telegram already has wat-bridge.
    What are your thoughts on that topic? Do you think the history will repeat itself? Would a new federated formate like XMPP rise up?

    26 votes
  15. Comment on Former Mozilla exec: Google has sabotaged Firefox for years in ~tech

    NeoTheFox Link Parent
    While a redesign can take a lot of time and effort it doesn't absolve it from quality control. The API got deprecated by the time they rolled it out, and if you are right in your suggestion that...

    While a redesign can take a lot of time and effort it doesn't absolve it from quality control. The API got deprecated by the time they rolled it out, and if you are right in your suggestion that it just took long they could've delayed it to replace this API with something else. Since they didn't it implies one of two things, either:

    1. They decided to only test their designs against Chrome internally or/and base their judgment on if something is ready solely on Chrome, or
    2. They are deliberately picking out the worst possible cases for other browser to make Chrome look better

    While both options are possible, neither of them is good for the web as a whole, a critical infrastructure that Google represents right now on the web means that the neglect of standards and favoritism on their part gives them power over w3c, mozilla and any other player. One can even say that the biggest web company controlling the biggest web browser is a clear case for antitrust investigation, specifically because of these cases.

    7 votes
  16. Comment on Former Mozilla exec: Google has sabotaged Firefox for years in ~tech

    NeoTheFox Link Parent
    Take the YouTube case, for example - the redesign used a deprecated DOM API. Now, if you ever had any experience doing websites one of the first things you do when you test stuff is cross-browser...

    Take the YouTube case, for example - the redesign used a deprecated DOM API. Now, if you ever had any experience doing websites one of the first things you do when you test stuff is cross-browser testing, to make sure that everything works the same across at least Chrome, Firefox, IE and Safari. So, it just so happened that the biggest web corporation in existence somehow decided to use a deprecated API in it's new design for one of the most critical websites it has, and it also just so happens that Chrome is the only browser that has that one deprecated API?

    9 votes
  17. Comment on I might switch my PC media player from VLC to something else due to potential data leaks. What other media player should I choose if I do so? in ~tech

    NeoTheFox Link
    I can suggest MPV or any libmpv based player, like mochi-player.

    I can suggest MPV or any libmpv based player, like mochi-player.

    10 votes
  18. Comment on Hear what a genderless AI voice sounds like—and consider why it matters in ~tech

    NeoTheFox Link Parent
    And I answered you that it sounds servile because it's made to sound servile. The original comment I responded to: So I've said that I prefer female voices sounding servile and nice. I never...

    And I answered you that it sounds servile because it's made to sound servile.
    The original comment I responded to:

    Default female-voiced virtual assistants always sound uncomfortably servile, with intonations meant to be as unthreatening and "nice" as possible.

    So I've said that I prefer female voices sounding servile and nice. I never implied that female voices are inherently servile.

    4 votes