Sill's recent activity

  1. Comment on Resources for music composition? in ~music

    Sill
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    I'm not aware of any great interactive music theory software, but it would seem likely that it would be out there. Alternative.to can be a good place to check if you want a better version of...

    I'm not aware of any great interactive music theory software, but it would seem likely that it would be out there. Alternative.to can be a good place to check if you want a better version of something you were able to find in a particular software niche.

    You might be best served by being comfortable with a DAW/composition software, and a book or course on music theory that you experiment with?

    For DAWs, LMMS is free and cross-platform. Popular commercial options are Ableton, Fruity Loops. I think GarageBand might have some theory-in-a-box features, don't know if it's still restricted to Macs though.

    If you want to composition/notation software, you could try out MuseScore.

    Audacity is pretty simple to use if all you want to do is record/mix instruments.

    You may find some decent courses on the various MOOCs out there.

    If you're math-inclined you may enjoy a book like Benson's Music: A Mathematical Offering.

    There's also tons of neural-net/algorithmic music composition stuff out there. MIDI and the structure of things like counter point / classical music rules lend themselves pretty well to that.

    3 votes
  2. Comment on Google tracked his bike ride past a burglarized home. That made him a suspect in ~tech

    Sill
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    If you used AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, or Verizon your location data was being sold with very little oversight.

    If you used AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, or Verizon your location data was being sold with very little oversight.

    4 votes
  3. Comment on Some of my internet radio stations aren't playing on my computer [SOLVED] in ~tech

    Sill
    Link Parent
    If you don't want to use Firefox, you could at least make a shortcut to have VLC directly open a station by: Play the station you want. Media-->Save Playlist to File--> save the shortcut where you...

    If you don't want to use Firefox, you could at least make a shortcut to have VLC directly open a station by:

    • Play the station you want.
    • Media-->Save Playlist to File--> save the shortcut where you want it
    • Open the playlist to start the station.
    2 votes
  4. Comment on Some of my internet radio stations aren't playing on my computer [SOLVED] in ~tech

    Sill
    Link Parent
    F12 takes you to Chrome's JavaScript console. If a script is causing an error this is a good place to check to see if any errors are being output. Ad-blockers will typically need to update either...

    What console? I'm not using a game device. It's a desktop computer.

    F12 takes you to Chrome's JavaScript console. If a script is causing an error this is a good place to check to see if any errors are being output.

    The ad-blocker has been installed for ages. I would be surprised if it suddenly stopped blocking radio signals a couple of days ago.

    Ad-blockers will typically need to update either the list of addresses they block or the method they use to block elements from loading, so this can be a possible culprit without you changing anything. Not that it is, in this case.

    I tried it out (just the joy.org.au one) on Chrome and reproduced your problem. This is the error in Chrome's console.

    A quick guess would be that those stations are using Shoutcast v1 instead of v2, or there's some issue with SSL.

    I couldn't find any quick fixes for Chrome, but you should be able to use Firefox, if you'd like.

    VLC should also work, but make sure you're using Media-->Open Network Stream, and remove the two dashes from the end of your link (use this). Those weren't meant to be part of the URL.

    6 votes
  5. Comment on Some of my internet radio stations aren't playing on my computer [SOLVED] in ~tech

    Sill
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    Have you taken a look at the console to see if there are any errors popping up? F12 should be the shortcut. Have you tried disabling any sort of ad/script blocker that you might have installed? Do...

    Have you taken a look at the console to see if there are any errors popping up? F12 should be the shortcut.

    Have you tried disabling any sort of ad/script blocker that you might have installed? Do you have a hosts file that blocks anything that might be relevant?

    Neither cause an issue with my build of Firefox, though the joy.org.au station has a finnicky volume control that automatically changes on mouseover.

    The stream for that station is http://stream.joy.org.au/proxy/joy949?mp=/live-- you could try going to that directly or through something like VLC-->Open Network Stream to see if that has different results.

    7 votes
  6. Comment on Untitled Mental Health I in ~creative

    Sill
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    The castle crumbled under strain and what was left was ruins Slowly washed away by rain, til stone joined dirts' confluence Sun baked down drying depth of sounding, showing stones' privation Dirt...
    The castle crumbled under strain and what was left was ruins
    Slowly washed away by rain, til stone joined dirts' confluence
    
    Sun baked down drying depth of sounding, showing stones' privation
    Dirt turned mud turned dirt again, til seasons restored lake's foundation
    
    Sifting silt from sediment and salt, later plants were sown
    On banks of Nile, struggling hearts kept making fragile homes
    The cradle of civilization made when castle turned to loam
    Be secure, be well, be many things; alone, or not alone
    
    9 votes
  7. Comment on Right-wing populists look poised to keep winning in ~news

    Sill
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    I read a book called The Righteous Mind that argues something similar. The author added on "liberty" to some other proposed moral foundations: Care: cherishing and protecting others; opposite of...

    I read a book called The Righteous Mind that argues something similar.

    The author added on "liberty" to some other proposed moral foundations:

    • Care: cherishing and protecting others; opposite of
    • Fairness or proportionality: rendering justice according to shared rules; opposite of cheating
    • Loyalty or ingroup: standing with your group, family, nation; opposite of betrayal
    • Authority or respect: submitting to tradition and legitimate authority; opposite of subversion
    • Sanctity or purity: abhorrence for disgusting things, foods, actions; opposite of degradation
    • Liberty (opposite of oppression)

    The author claimed (iirc... been a while) that Democrats failed to appeal to more than care and fairness, and were missing out on a large chunk of what the population felt valuable because of that.

    I found the argument interesting, but maybe not super compelling in the form it was presented. Do Republicans value loyalty when they malign McCain, or when Trump calls never-Trumpers human scum in a tweet? Or is the "group" you're supposed to be loyal to so flexible it can change in a year?

    I think the idea that people have different and equally important (not necessarily equally desirable) drivers in terms of what they value important. It reminded me a lot of some of what I've read on Gamification, and how a game like World of Warcraft may have things that appeal to Collectors, Socializers, Explorers, Optimizers, etc.

    5 votes
  8. Comment on What are some non-English words that you believe would be good candidates for inclusion in English dictionaries? in ~humanities

    Sill
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    The positive lexicography project is a collection of words for positive emotions that are hard to translate across languages. I'd be interested in a thread like this for idioms. My idiom white...

    The positive lexicography project is a collection of words for positive emotions that are hard to translate across languages.

    I'd be interested in a thread like this for idioms. My idiom white whale comes from a friend in college learning Russian through a book of English-Russian swears, and there was a way of calling someone lazy that was something like:

    You beat a pear tree with your dick expecting fruit to fall off.

    4 votes
  9. Comment on Adblocking for Android Smart Phone? in ~comp

    Sill
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    Thanks for the correction/added details! My knowledge is pretty out of date, so maybe I shouldn't have tried to give an answer.

    Thanks for the correction/added details! My knowledge is pretty out of date, so maybe I shouldn't have tried to give an answer.

    3 votes
  10. Comment on Adblocking for Android Smart Phone? in ~comp

    Sill
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    If you root your phone you can use a Magisk module called Vanced which acts as an alternative Youtube app. It has a lot of desirable things, including ad blocking and background play. Blockada is...

    If you root your phone you can use a Magisk module called Vanced which acts as an alternative Youtube app. It has a lot of desirable things, including ad blocking and background play.

    Blockada is a system-wide ad-blocker that doesn't require root. Something like AdAway is an easy hosts-based add blocker if you have root.

    Depending on what he wants, a Pi-hole might be a good solution.

    6 votes
  11. Comment on Marauding Cat Destroys Colony Of Threatened Australian Seabirds in ~enviro

    Sill
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    As a fellow USA dweller... y-yeah. I feel you. We still make laws like "at 16/17/18 you are an adult" instead of "the age of consent will be done case-by-case based on the...

    As a fellow USA dweller... y-yeah. I feel you.

    We still make laws like "at 16/17/18 you are an adult" instead of "the age of consent will be done case-by-case based on the emotional/intellectual/physical maturity of the individual" and with good reason.

    Once that idea is in place, nearly anything is easily hand waived away as necessary, profitable, 'not that bad', etc...

    I don't think I'm completely confident in my views of animal treatment, and one lingering question I have involves economics so I'll try to share it. I'm fairly brain-dead atm though, so apologies if I don't make sense:

    When horses were used for transportation there were over 20 million of them. Now there are ~9 million. I imagine if (when) there is a tastier, cheaper, healthier, less cruel, lab-grown alternative to beef there is going to be a rapid loss in demand, and a precipitous decline in the number of cows out there.

    Is it better to have a cow not exist entirely than to have it live in the factory farming system?

    What about a more humane system, where it has company, freedom of movement, healthcare, and protection from predators and starvation, with the caveat that when it will eventually be sold and eaten? Sold for an amount that results in another cow being reared.

    You can think of nature as the baseline of a species of animals expected quality of life, and for many species it is one that is absurdly cruel. Animals will suffer from parasites, starve, and be eaten alive. It doesn't seem that hard to argue that no matter what measures you use for quality-of-cow-life there could exist some humane farm / pet owner that provides a better one.

    Is the argument against farming that such a farm can't exist, because of the warping effects of capitalism/the profit incentive? Is it that such a life isn't "dignified" in some way, and that quality of life isn't the right thing to measure to answer the question "what is a cow life worth living?"? Some sort of noblesse oblige of humanity? An argument that humans shouldn't play God and just leave X% of the world to let nature be nature, even if that is cruel, inefficient, or leads to extinction of endangered species?

    If the quality of life provided by humans for animals is above the average life experienced in the wild, and the one the humans provide still doesn't pass the test of a life-worth-living, do you end up arguing for some sort of anti-natalism where animals in the wild simply shouldn't exist?

    2 votes
  12. Comment on Marauding Cat Destroys Colony Of Threatened Australian Seabirds in ~enviro

    Sill
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    I don't disagree. The line of thought was that we don't let the populace own bears or camels (in ecosystems they'd destroy), even though a properly trained person might be able to responsibly own...

    That's a pretty far reaching argument as it's effectively a blanket statement for humanity

    I don't disagree. The line of thought was that we don't let the populace own bears or camels (in ecosystems they'd destroy), even though a properly trained person might be able to responsibly own one. If you do a survey and find X% of your average pet Y owners mistreat it / let it kill hundreds of birds each year, what should you do?

    You can say anything should be case-by-case, but policy and laws are primarily driven by what is likely to be true. Hopefully with ways of elevating cases that need more attention paid to them.

    As in, "90% of amateur Burmese python owners will release them into the wild. 0.1% of professionals will. Therefore we should require an exotic pets license for owning Burmese pythons."

    What do you do if your best evidence suggests your average cat owner will let their cat kill 100 birds per year?

    Absolutely it is, all across the world for a wide variety of purposes, most notably animals labeled as 'food'.

    I'm pretty tired and didn't phrase that very well. There are things that we consider animal abuse (dog fights, starvation, etc.) and other things we probably ought to (isolation in social animals, factory farming/eating meat). The same can be true of lots of other things. Fifty years from now we may look at boxing or football or beauty pageants as forms of abuse.

    I didn't mean to imply we treat animals/pets well, just that we care. That, largely, we have some minimum threshold for how pets should be treated. As a society we don't really care about the suffering of drosophila or mosquitoes, so I wouldn't ask "how much should we care about mosquito suffering".

    2 votes
  13. Comment on Marauding Cat Destroys Colony Of Threatened Australian Seabirds in ~enviro

    Sill
    Link Parent
    For the sake of discussion: Should (ignoring the insurmountable opposition by the cat caucus) cats be treated as a controlled/invasive species? Animal trainers can safely handle dangerous animals...

    For the sake of discussion:

    • Should (ignoring the insurmountable opposition by the cat caucus) cats be treated as a controlled/invasive species?
      Animal trainers can safely handle dangerous animals like bears, or animals that are controlled due to being a threat to the ecosystem.
      Afaik, we don't let regular people own these animals as pets because we assume they don't manage them in a responsible way, and the 40+ extinct species of birds suggests people won't handle their cats in a responsible way either.
    • If you can't provide a good quality life to a pet should you be allowed to have it, and does this apply to "responsible" cat ownership?
      We don't tolerate obvious mistreatment of animals, but social animals that are kept alone / locked in an apartment while their owner works has always felt like an uncomfortable exception. Birds will start pecking out their own feathers from the stress.
      Is there any case to be made that a cat can't have a good quality of life if it doesn't get to go outside? Or that some animals (not cats) need to predate to thrive? Feel like I've heard of animals (e.g., snakes) that won't eat unless they hunt and eat something living.
    4 votes
  14. Comment on Rasputina - Willow Tree (Irish) in ~music

    Sill
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    This song is part of a triptych, along with the English and American versions. When I first heard the Irish version I was confused. Was the woman happy to see him? Was it hinting at infidelity, or...

    This song is part of a triptych, along with the English and American versions.

    When I first heard the Irish version I was confused. Was the woman happy to see him? Was it hinting at infidelity, or her father selling her?

    It felt like things clicked when on a later date I heard about takotsubo cardiomyopathy, a.k.a. "broken heart syndrome". A happy emotional event that caused a fatal heart condition sounds like what this song is describing.

    What an awful moment. Three years of separation and struggle, and when you're at your happiest--spotting the person you love and eager to reunite and share your successes-- you see something go wrong. Then a month of declining health, watching a loved one wilt away.

    Since the song comes from 1939 at the latest, it's a little fossil of a condition that wasn't understood yet. In that light, the American version is a serial murder whose m.o. was stripping and drowning.

    Also willow trees are pretty cool. And one of my favorite fan theories is Tom Bombadil = Evil...

    1 vote
  15. Comment on Remove Richard Stallman in ~tech

    Sill
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    Not weighing in on the women in STEM/Stallman stuff (I'm uninformed and it isn't a priority issue for me), but two things on your searching: It's misogyny, as in androgyny or gynecology, but I...

    Not weighing in on the women in STEM/Stallman stuff (I'm uninformed and it isn't a priority issue for me), but two things on your searching:

    • It's misogyny, as in androgyny or gynecology, but I doubt that effected your results.
    • The most recent incident is going to be dominating all search results for Stallman, so adding a "before 2019" clause to the search is a good way to filter that out. Unfortunately I don't think you can do that with DDG.
    6 votes
  16. Comment on The FGC9 is a 3D Printed firearm that is built from unregulated components and costs 100$ to make in ~hobbies

    Sill
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    I agree that treating treating root causes is best (you have a great list below!), and think using political attention & will on gun control in the U.S. isn't very productive for a variety of...

    I agree that treating treating root causes is best (you have a great list below!), and think using political attention & will on gun control in the U.S. isn't very productive for a variety of reasons. That said, I'm pretty uncomfortable with there being a de facto ban on the CDC studying the issue, and that a lot of the rhetoric gets down to "the Founding Fathers in their infinite wisdom knew one day some citizens would need to be able to kill other citizens/the gov't as effectively as possible."

    What are your thoughts on regulating (likely) upcoming technology that is significantly more lethal than guns, such as bioweapons that could be made with increasingly sophisticated and cheap home labs? Or something like the gray goo doomsday scenario, if nano technology develops and such a scenario is even plausible.

    As a thought experiment, what if it turns out there is just a natural asymmetry between offense and defense? What if the same technology that has valid uses (AI, biotech, etc.) enables one crazy person to kill billions, and the only way to prevent that possibility is policy that would be considered tyranny from the viewpoint of today?

    5 votes
  17. Comment on The curious case of a weapon in Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory that sounded so good players thought it was overpowered in ~games.game_design

    Sill
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    Having never really played games like this, I was curious if it was possible that the differences in the models of the guns gave positions away. The example pictures had different shapes and...

    Having never really played games like this, I was curious if it was possible that the differences in the models of the guns gave positions away. The example pictures had different shapes and lengths.

    The impression I was given by the person interviewed about the game was that they only changed the audio, and that the "problem" they were seeing with differences in kill rates on the servers went away after that, implying the audio was the primary contributing factor.

    5 votes
  18. Comment on Has science shown that consciousness is only an illusion? in ~humanities

    Sill
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    Not a fan of the article. This is bad faith argument. It's obvious the person being quoted wasn't saying eukaryota and bacteria are the same domain, but instead pointing out there is a continuum...

    Not a fan of the article.

    No evolutionary biologist thinks that humans “evolved from” bacteria either; we belong to a quite different kingdom of life from bacteria. And whether or not our genius is God-given is certainly a matter of opinion.

    This is bad faith argument. It's obvious the person being quoted wasn't saying eukaryota and bacteria are the same domain, but instead pointing out there is a continuum from the Earth being a swirl of space dust to mankind, and at some point along the way we say consciousness comes in.

    And then, with no expansion on it, suggesting a metaphysical explanation is a worthwhile explanation, and conflating that "genius" is what is being talked about when we discuss consciousness?

    It's weird that evidence suggests if you get a lot of dense hydrogen and wait a few billion years, parts of it starts thinking about where it came from and why it exists. Somewhere along our evolution from repeating chemical chain reaction-->single-celled organism-->mudskipper-->man, most of us agree consciousness comes in.

    Is it a switch that is toggled? Granular or continuous? Just like the different domains of human life are there divergent types of consciousness and qualia, things that are--at present-- uniquely "bat" or "ant-colony" qualia?

    If you take religious explanations seriously (while believing in evolution) then it seems to follow that there was a generation of mindless, soul-less human ancestors who had a child who had consciousness. That must've been really awkward, having dominion over your parents and not getting to hang out in the afterlife. And if that proto-human had offspring with someone else who hadn't crossed that threshold of "sufficiently evolved" would some of his children have souls/consciousness and some not?

    I know I've heard wasps talked about as a candidate for being zombies (p-zombie). They carry on their tasks, oblivious even if the back half of them is in the process of being eaten. A quick search didn't get anything, but I remember it being brought up that there was reason to believe wasps evolved this sort of body awareness (not that that means there was qualia) and then it was too metabolically expensive so they lost it.

    I'd guess most people would feel that consciousness isn't an on-off switch. A chimpanzee can feel pain and not just reflex / nociception. Maybe a fish can. Maybe bacteria or Google can, but it's too hard to live life while thinking that way.

    Thinking of consciousness as existing on a continuum naturally leads to thinking about what the building blocks of consciousness are, and then Ship of Theseus replacements with identical/functionally identical parts. Neurons seem like a good candidate. At least since Julien Offray de La Mettrie people have realized there is a connection between brain and conscious experience.

    An illusion is a false perception. Our thoughts are imperfect representations of our brain/minds and of the world, but that doesn’t make them necessarily false.

    Sometimes these discussions feel like nothing more than wordplay, that would go away if everyone agreed to precise definitions. I think I've gotten a lot more out of neurology/psychology than I have philosophy.

    In V.S. Ramachandran's "Phantoms in the Brain" (alternate proposed title: "The Man Who Mistook His Foot for His Penis") he mentions an experiment that can be done in which ~50% of people feel that their nose has grown to over a foot in length.

    If I remember correctly, a blindfolded person sits behind another and extends their arm to tap on the nose of the person in front of them. At the same frequency, a 3rd person taps the nose of the blindfolded person. The blindfolded person's brain resolves the texture on their finger, the position of their arm, and the sensation on their nose as "well, I guess my nose must actually be the one being tapped, and that means it's a foot away".

    Is that sensation an illusion? Or the brain-generated percepts in all sorts of optical illusions, where you see something that is missing in the picture, but which ought to be there? In a study I've seen, those "brain-generated" percepts are reported to be more "real" than reality.

    Are chimeric images where you have parts of your brain arguing "that picture is a crone!" - "no, it's a young woman!" evidence that you have more than one consciousness in your head? Are split brain studies where a person with a severed corpus callosum will say they want to do entirely different things for a career depending on whether they're asked or read the question? What consciousness does a drunk Mel Gibson and a sober Mel Gibson share?

    Sometimes I wonder if the "hard problem of consciousness" isn't the same as saying "the hard problem of gravity". Is it possible there is a physical limitation (e.g., Planck constant) on the instruments we can make to try to dig deeper into what is going on with gravity or other bits of physics, in the same way that maybe we can't really disprove strong solipsism? Definitely.

    That doesn't mean that we can't make drugs and predict what sort of altered mind state they'll result in. Or induce near-death-experience states with hypoxia. Or use transcranial magnetic stimulation or some sort of neural prosthetic to cause targeted changes, and see if you can understand how brain maps to mind. Or the (at least last time I looked) exponentially improving spatial/temporal resolution of brain imaging.

    15 votes
  19. Comment on Conversion therapy group founder comes out as gay, apologizes in ~lgbt

    Sill
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    I think there are two topics that are being touched upon: What is the appropriate use of empathy. What are the responsibilities of authority. On the first point, I think you're getting pushback...

    I think there are two topics that are being touched upon:

    • What is the appropriate use of empathy.
    • What are the responsibilities of authority.

    On the first point, I think you're getting pushback because some people feel empathy has been weaponized to some extent, allowing the more compassionate members to seek to understand the problems of abusers to the neglect or detriment of the abused.

    Not to jump to Godwin's law, but as a reductio ad absurdum, what would your reaction be if someone started humanizing Hitler?

    "He suffered from PTSD from his experiences with trench war, in one of the ugliest conflicts of human history. He knew the Truth of the loss of the war: betrayal by the Jewish Bolsheviks. What could have been a glorious empire was undermined by the untermenschen, and the countless horrifying deaths of his countrymen were repaid with shame and catastrophic reparations. The Catholic Church and much of Europe understood the problem and tacitly approved of his eugenics. American thinkers inspired them with works like the president of Stanford's "The Blood of the Nation", along with the implementation of forced sterilization--existing to this day-- of undesirables and miscegenation....."

    Is that a worthwhile use of empathy? What is a worthwhile use of empathy? Something that brings comfort to the victims? Rehabilitation to abusers? Are there problems with it, like fostering appeasement, dividing/misdirecting the compassionate, or weakening the deterrence of public judgment?

    I've heard this topic brought up in the news coverage of the regret of a racist cop who framed (40+?) black men and ruined their lives, but was only mentioned in the context of "he learned his lesson and is now friends with one of the people he framed", to the neglect of story of his victims. Or in the coverage of how incels get to be incels through sad and understandable paths, to the neglect of women they've stalked or threatened.

    Or a conflict of view between Daryl Davis (befriended and defrocked many (older) members of the KKK) and a young, less tolerant, activist. Paraphrased I think it was something like "this 5% conversion rate of retired KKK members is great on the micro, but on the macro it isn't helping to stop the repeal of the voting rights act".

    Have you given due consideration to the person you've replied to, or due diligence to understand their background?

    I've had two housemates that were homeless for years because of their families reaction to them coming out. We can see the stats on the number of suicides of worsening of mental health in the wake of conversion camps.

    Not all conversion therapy includes torture.

    Proof? Is it possible to change someones sexual orientation without causing them harm? Are there any faith-based conversion camps that don't promote the idea that an omni-benevolent God made you broken (and may burn you for eternity (but necrophiliac gangrape-to-death gay ducks are cool))?

    You can always request more research of someone else (was there electroconvulsive therapy? Is ECT actually bad or an efficacious treatment of... Did you read the meta-analysis and have the right background in science/stats to understand it? By what ethical framework is eugenics wrong?). I think it's important to appreciate how much of a psychological blindspot our own heuristics are, though.

    Conversion camp = bad/abusive, is a heuristic that is probably mostly right, and it's effortful or even impossible to get a more accurate view, sometimes. "The person I'm talking to didn't have the love of their life kidnapped and tormented into suicide, and is open to being open-minded about my take on compassion" is a heuristic that is also going to almost always be right.

    These are both assumptions:

    "you're not giving him any sympathy for having been brainwashed into religion as a child"

    "But, no. You just ignore all the shades of grey and all the nuances of the situation."

    ...and they seem to be at least partly at odds with what was said:

    "Oh no I see his reasoning, but claiming "god said so" doesn't excuse morally bankrupt behavior."

    You can understand someone is an abuser because of brain chemistry or environment, while arguably still not being in a place you want/ought to excuse them or overly empathize.


    The other point I'm not going to get into because I don't have much time and it isn't relevant to what you said, even if I think it is to the topic.

    15 votes