ThatFanficGuy's recent activity

  1. Comment on Weekly megathread for news/updates/discussion of Russian invasion of Ukraine - July 28 in ~news

    ThatFanficGuy
    Link Parent
    The equation is very simple: You have a thing that symbolizes a Western kind of prosperity. It means maybe Russia has made it to the big leagues. Most of the things Russia makes to "compete" are...

    The equation is very simple:

    You have a thing that symbolizes a Western kind of prosperity. It means maybe Russia has made it to the big leagues.

    Most of the things Russia makes to "compete" are objectively crap by comparison. They're an option if you can't do better.

    Suddenly, that symbol of prosperity is taken away from you. All you're left with is the crap that has no prospect of improving.

    It's that simple.

    No matter how you feel about these people, your dismissal of sodas and brands does nothing to alleviate their concern of being stuck inside a time machine that goes into steadily the past.

    10 votes
  2. Comment on Weekly megathread for news/updates/discussion of Russian invasion of Ukraine - July 28 in ~news

    ThatFanficGuy
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    @NoblePath asked in a previous thread. Posting here for posterity: I'm well. The work permit I'm waiting for is still in progress, hopefully resolved within the next week or two. I don't post on...
    • Exemplary

    @NoblePath asked in a previous thread. Posting here for posterity:

    I'm well. The work permit I'm waiting for is still in progress, hopefully resolved within the next week or two. I don't post on Tildes anymore: just browse for aggregate links every now and again.

    Russia is much the same as it was when I last commented, except now it's becoming difficult to buy Coca-Cola, local fast-food franchises can no longer sell any of the Western sugary drinks, and import replacement is going bananas.

    Supplies of the original Coke are dwindling to a point where smaller stores simply have none, and in larger stores that one shelf is nearly empty every time I visit. (All other shelves, including Pepsi and Russian sodas, are well-stocked.) There's an abundance of sugar-free and "taste" Coke (Vanilla, Lemon etc.). I have a bottle in the fridge, which I intend to open whenever the work permit gets issued. "Taste of the West" and whatnot.

    (Conversation I'd overheard about a month ago, in a hypermarket: mother and her young – 9 years old or thereabouts – daughter. The daughter looks at the nearly-empty Coke shelf, turns to her mom and says: "Mom, our Cola is running out!". Mom, in a typical permanently-tired-of-everything Russian-mom voice, tells her to get a Russian import-replacement cola drink. "And is it the same as our Cola?", asks the girl. "Yes, yes, it's the same", responds the mother. NARRATOR: It very much wasn't.)

    The soda difficulties with fast-food chains here probably amount to complete and utter inability to acquire the syrups. You can still buy it from third parties on Craigslist-like platforms in Russia, but I imagine it's unsustainable for large food chains like Burger King and KFC. Transition to local-drink syrups has only happened within the last few weeks. I imagine this alone would reduce the amount of customers for the franchisees: people will see it as the franchise failing in quality.

    Import replacement is not a solution for Russia, with its regularly-poor food-production sector. These recent soda brands in particular aren't awful – and will be one of the very few options if you're, say, a child with little pocket cash – but the Western options are just better. This extends to many other recreation foods. (Sustainance food has always been okay.)

    I had the pleasure of trying a pack of St. Michel cookies, produced in France and imported here probably well before the war. (Not unpopular, just not a hot product to begin with, for reasons of pricing.) The local pack costs something like 5 USD (using the current propped-up RUB rate), while in Paris it goes for slightly over 2.40 EUR. The quality of these was simply incomparable: the texture was smoother, the taste was richer, the size was bigger, and the whole thing didn't even fall apart inside the packaging. I quipped to my Polish friend that day: "I get now why Western Europe has such high quality of life. If I were to get to eat cookies like that on the [relative] cheap, I'd feel much happier too".

    Some media spin the everyday "normalcy" in Russia as people not caring about what's happening. Take a walk outside, though, and you'll hear people discussing war or some aspect of it now and again. These are people who are scared but aware how far away are they from a position of leverage against a power-hungry lunatic. You can blame this weakness against the ruling apparatus on self-victimization, and you'll have a point. It's a historical trauma Russians will have to overcome eventually.

    The state-controlled media in Russia have used this sense of "always someone else's fault" effectively, to subdue the population, to render people complacent, though not obedient. Campaigns to recruit mercenaries within Russia have to promise astronomical wages to the would-be soldiers – money that could clearly have been put into better health care or education before the war – to even have a chance to lure them in. (The unspoken promise of looted stuff, including fuckin' dildoes, add an allure of its own.) The government's trying really hard not to have to resort to general mobilization because that would tank the madman's inflated approval score very quickly. (Just google fire recruitment center russia if you need any proof.)

    Anyway, I talk too much.

    16 votes
  3. Comment on Weekly megathread for news/updates/discussion of Russian invasion of Ukraine - June 16 in ~news

    ThatFanficGuy
    Link Parent
    See, I don't believe you. I think it's very clear what my point is. It's why I mentioned pastor Niemöller. Politicking for the sake of one's image is not helping. You're a head of a Western...

    So I really don’t understand your point here

    See, I don't believe you. I think it's very clear what my point is. It's why I mentioned pastor Niemöller.

    Politicking for the sake of one's image is not helping. You're a head of a Western European state: you have access to some top-notch military intelligence by default. If that isn't enough for you to figure out that shit is on fire and your help, as an economic superior with a stake in the balance of the region, is very much required, you done fucked up.

    Equally, if as a head of state you can't do much to rally your own people to support the fight for democracy through which you were elected, there are not enough genuis-grade photographs of handshaking and standing confidently in suits to do anything. If this is the only thing keeping Ukraine in the news, y'all might as well shut up and do nothing, 'cause in that case, Ukraine is done before it's able to shed its last breath.

    So let me make my point abundantly clear this time:

    What I think these three, and more to their side, need to do is affix their scrotums back to their nethers and make sure the flow of support never stops as long as they're in office. Talking about a sovereign Ukraine is not enough right now, even to the president of it. The attitude of taking things slow and careful needs to die if a lot of innocent and brilliant Ukrainians are to live.

    3 votes
  4. Comment on Weekly megathread for news/updates/discussion of Russian invasion of Ukraine - June 16 in ~news

    ThatFanficGuy
    Link Parent
    A war that threatens Europe is not a good time to find out courtesy pageants are more important than on-the-ground support. It was a German pastor who versed "Then they came for the Jews", so I...

    A war that threatens Europe is not a good time to find out courtesy pageants are more important than on-the-ground support.

    It was a German pastor who versed "Then they came for the Jews", so I can't begin to concern myself with how upset the Germans are about it. Ukraine needs all the fucking support it can get, because people are dying.

    3 votes
  5. Comment on Weekly megathread for news/updates/discussion of Russian invasion of Ukraine - June 16 in ~news

    ThatFanficGuy
    Link Parent
    I think we know why Russians are stealing washing machines now, huh. Aside from your regular looting, that is.

    I think we know why Russians are stealing washing machines now, huh.

    Aside from your regular looting, that is.

    2 votes
  6. Comment on Weekly megathread for news/updates/discussion of Russian invasion of Ukraine - June 16 in ~news

    ThatFanficGuy
    Link Parent
    I wonder what comes of it. Folks in my feeds gave flak to Macron for talking to Putin still, and to Scholz for bullshitting Ukraine about the promised and underdelivered military equipment....

    I wonder what comes of it.

    Folks in my feeds gave flak to Macron for talking to Putin still, and to Scholz for bullshitting Ukraine about the promised and underdelivered military equipment. Haven't even heard Draghi's name between those two.

    I'm all for Ukraine talking with European politicians, but I'm not sure these political stunts are the way to go. The criticisms levied again these heads of state are clear and actionable. Short of seeing Zelensky face to face to tell him "We're working on it, it will be here shortly" as a form of extreme reassurance, I'm not sure what conversations could happen in Kyiv that would make any difference.

    3 votes
  7. Comment on Weekly megathread for news/updates/discussion of Russian invasion of Ukraine - June 16 in ~news

    ThatFanficGuy
    Link Parent
    They were invited. That's the cruel part. Medvedev was hailed as the progressive president. He was supposed to put Russia on the map of technological capitals of the world. When asked how did...

    How did they ever get a seat at the table?

    They were invited. That's the cruel part.

    Medvedev was hailed as the progressive president. He was supposed to put Russia on the map of technological capitals of the world.

    When asked how did Medveded turn out this way today, Toomas Ilves, the former president of Estonia, responded: "He kept drinking".

    4 votes
  8. Comment on What is the most pedantic, arrogant, obnoxious answer for the sentence "Good morning!" you can think of? in ~creative

    ThatFanficGuy
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    "Don't you have laundry to do?" I think this needs Meryl Streep delivering it to really work.

    "Don't you have laundry to do?"

    I think this needs Meryl Streep delivering it to really work.

    6 votes
  9. Comment on Should superpowers announce? in ~talk

    ThatFanficGuy
    Link Parent
    The original argument was: if you think humanity cannot be trusted to hold the knowledge of this power, so by extension can't you. Anything else would simply prove this same point: fueled...

    Well, the reasoning here is usually that yourself is the only person you can truly know.

    The original argument was: if you think humanity cannot be trusted to hold the knowledge of this power, so by extension can't you. Anything else would simply prove this same point: fueled self-interest is only likely to cause harm.

    It's less about what you as a person are capable of, and more about whether you have enough trust in humanity in general and in any specific group of people in particular. If you have no trust in anyone else, there's hardly any reason to trust yourself with it still, since you too are human and are susceptible to breaks of morality and virtue.

    2 votes
  10. Comment on Should superpowers announce? in ~talk

    ThatFanficGuy
    Link
    I'll start with the basic premise: anything that helps humanity as a whole should be exposed. That is, any thing that has the potential to notably improve quality of life for the majority of...

    I'll start with the basic premise: anything that helps humanity as a whole should be exposed.

    That is, any thing that has the potential to notably improve quality of life for the majority of people, you (the wielder of said thing) have at least some moral impulse to relate it to people. Humans being a pro-social species, I assume this moral impulse applies by default to most people.

    Not "must", not "ought to", not "have to". I'm not a fan of imposed imperatives, because I believe people have the capacity to and should, therefore, have the power to decide for themselves. (Then again, I'm biased by having a strong moral core.)

    Beyond that, one must consider responsibility.

    I don't strictly believe that all consequences of an action is within one's responsibility. That is, you can't possibly predict that the air you blew in your son's face will, 15 years from now, cause the last strong tissues of a tree to break, resulting in the tree falling on a forest worker. There are limits to foresight of any single person: that's the reason we sometimes gather together to think of what may or may not come. There are, indeed, limits to foresight of the whole species: we can only reliably predict what we can meaningfully communicate above the noise across the largest possible informational surface, which is barely anything at all.

    Basically, if you can reliably go beyond first-order consequences of your actions, you should, but you can't be blamed for not having the capacity to do so. So, go as far as you can in predicting the outcomes of your actions, and base your decision on the results.

    These results are likely to change your decision. Governments that value power over the well-being of their citizens would likely abuse this new power when given access; so, don't release it in such a way where such governments can easily access it. Individuals likely to use this new power to only further their own gains would equally likely abuse is; so, make sure there are boundries between such individuals and the source of the power. And so on, and so forth.

    I reckon that if your conclusion here is "no one can be trusted, I must keep it hidden", then you've done a poor job assessing the situation. For one, "no one" means you too, so you should recluse yourself from handling it. (And if you don't, see the "individuals" example above.)

    This is about as far as I'm eager to go here: establish simple heuristics for someone to base their decisions on. Yes, this one has its roots in morality, which is a murky subject at best when it comes to power. But then, we aren't deciding the fate of the world here. :P

    Limited discussion welcome, however.

    2 votes
  11. Comment on We are (almost) halfway through the year. How is 2022 going for you? in ~talk

    ThatFanficGuy
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    I wouldn't ordinarily write anything particularly introspective on Tildes anymore, but this time, I feel like I could use a channel to verbalize my state of being so far. The year started well: I...

    I wouldn't ordinarily write anything particularly introspective on Tildes anymore, but this time, I feel like I could use a channel to verbalize my state of being so far.

    The year started well: I began writing for my own Russian-language magazine about New York, a city I'm deeply, maddeningly in love with. I gave myself a goal and overshot it: "15 minutes of reading time per issue minimum" quickly turned in 25 minutes and above. Turns out, I simply cannot speak concisely about something I'm envisioning so clearly. (Apparently, it's a feature of ADHD.)

    So now, I have a handful of long-reads I'm proud of, that look deep into the history and the present of New York. I plan on going on with it and, perhaps one day, developing it into something bigger than what it is right now: essentially a blog on a social network. I have but a dozen subscribers, and yet one has already decided to support me financially via patronage. This gives me hope about the future of this endeavor.

    Then, an elderly maniac attacked Ukraine – and stole their country away from thousands and thousands of intelligent, empathetic Russians... and also from me.

    Out of desperation, I messaged @Adys, whom I worked for briefly a long time ago, asking if he has any sort of prospects of escape for a nobody from a middle of nowhere. He came through for me big time, offering me guidance, insight, and a paved path for me, away from the shitshow happening on this end of the line. @Gaywallet helped me greatly as well: without his help I could not get the initial leg up in my journey.

    Three months of my life disappeared due to stress and worry and anxiety and an indeterminate future. On the positive side, I was able to safely travel and stay away from (what seemed at the time like) possible internal dangers of an aggressive war-in-everything-but-the-name, and I got to see a gorgeous and welcoming city of Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia. Should I ever get a chance to travel back there, I would do so in my own right as a tourist with the means to afford it. It would be a worthwhile trip.

    I wouldn't want to talk about how things are going right now, as it is an ongoing matter, but it does appear as though things are looking up for me. The relief of the news about my chances being good has invigorated my creativity, and so I'm back to writing for the magazine and making notes for other projects.

    I still have reasons to worry and plan for eventualities, but my prospects are much better than they were at the end of February.

    9 votes
  12. Comment on Weekly megathread for news/updates/discussion of Russian invasion of Ukraine - June 3 in ~news

    ThatFanficGuy
    Link
    Russia unexpectedly poor at cyberwar, say European military heads, by The Straits Times (The entire article is only twice as long as the excerpt.)

    Russia unexpectedly poor at cyberwar, say European military heads, by The Straits Times

    "Among cybersecurity experts we were pretty sure that there would be a cyber Pearl Harbour based on past experience of Russian behaviour and capabilities," said General Karol Molenda, head of Poland's National Cyber Security Centre.

    But Ukraine was prepared and "withstood attacks from Russia", Gen Molenda told a meeting of the International Cybersecurity Forum (FIC) held in the northern France city of Lille.

    This showed, he added, that you can prepare for cyber conflict against Russia, which he said was "good at offensive capabilities but not so good at defence".

    He cited multiple cyber attacks which had hit the country, the work mainly of independent hackers.

    (The entire article is only twice as long as the excerpt.)

    4 votes
  13. Comment on Uvalde and police "duty" in ~misc

    ThatFanficGuy
    Link Parent
    That's the episode. I think, then, that the reason I remember it being from 99% Invisible is because they retranslated the Radio Lab episode, as they tend to do every once in a while with similar...

    I believe you are thinking of the Radio Lab episode No Special Duty

    That's the episode. I think, then, that the reason I remember it being from 99% Invisible is because they retranslated the Radio Lab episode, as they tend to do every once in a while with similar educational shows.

    Thank you for linking it.

    2 votes
  14. Comment on Uvalde and police "duty" in ~misc

    ThatFanficGuy
    Link Parent
    I feel like if your action is "let's make the police enforce the law and that's it", it doesn't matter what your word is. You're already telling your citizens "We're not here to take care of you,...

    I feel like if your action is "let's make the police enforce the law and that's it", it doesn't matter what your word is. You're already telling your citizens "We're not here to take care of you, but also, don't you dare take matters into your own hands". Intentional or not, the results matter more than the intent when it comes to anything at the scale of an entire nation.

    So the lack of a vote is not all that absurd. If you want a scared and compliant populace, you give the police all the power and none of the responsibility.

    This may be on the cynical side, but then, nothing I've seen inspires optimism about this.

    What I really want to see is any effort that's been done to curb the overwhelming power of the police. Legislation, campaigning, that sorta stuff. I feel like just seeing effort being made to make a society better would inspire others to join the cause, or at least find their own way to help. Talking about the terrible truths helps, but having it go without also shedding light on the good nature of the people fighting oppression and injustice just makes people fuckin' depressed.

    3 votes
  15. Comment on Uvalde and police "duty" in ~misc

    ThatFanficGuy
    (edited )
    Link
    I know of a related analysis / overview of a similar situation. It's an episode of Radio Lab titled No Special Duty. The story goes: a man uses a New York City subway train. The carriage is (from...

    I know of a related analysis / overview of a similar situation. It was told in an episode of the podcast 99% Invisible, though for the life of me I can neither remember its title nor find it via the podcast site's (otherwise sharp) search function. If you know which episode that is, please link it. It's an episode of Radio Lab titled No Special Duty.

    The story goes: a man uses a New York City subway train. The carriage is (from what I remember) mostly empty, safe for a few people. The carriage is also the very first carriage of the train, and from the inside you can see a bit of what's happening inside the driver's room. Inside the room, there are the driver and two police officers.

    The man telling the story describes the train starting to move, but it was moving so slowly as though a single person was pushing the entire train from behind. At some point, another man on the carriage stands up, walks to a woman sitting some distance away from him, and proceeds to stab her viciously, multiple times, with the ferocity of an animal. The police officers in the driver's room stay in, despite seeing clearly what is happening outside the room.

    The stabber may or may not then hurt other people inside the carriage (from which no one can leave, since the train is moving), and then comes up to the man telling the story – and stabs him viciously multiple times.

    The man wakes up at the hospital, with his family around him. The damage from the stabbings is massive, but he survives. His sister, a police officer, balks at hearing police slang (the exact phrase I forget) which means (as she tells her brother) "the victim is unlikely to survive". The man'd heard the slang term from the police officers on the train as he was blacking out from the blood loss.

    As the man later finds out, what happened on the train was: the police knew about a mass murderer on the loose in the vicinity of that particular train station, and have speculated that the murderer might board a train there. So, two officers were dispatched on that train in order to make sure the murderer gets caught. It was not among their goals to protect any possible victims; in fact, it has been speculated that they were using the people on the train to bait the murderer, in other to catch him quicker. The police officers on that train stayed inside the driver's room because they felt they could get hurt.

    It may or may not be the same episode, but 99% Invisible also touches on the two cases Legal Eagle brings up in his video.

    The conclusion of the episode was: while the interviewed police officers say specifically that "[their] duty" is "to protect and serve", the law does not see it that way. The conclusion was that no police officer has any obligation to protect any individual from harm.

    Which was a deeply disheartening thing to hear. From a purely rational standpoint, I understand it: okay, their duty is to enforce the law, and the law does not prevent a person from being harmed: it simply punishes those who harm someone, as a measure of deterrent. But it does feel beyond fucked up that one cannot rely on anyone but themselves in order to protect their life because ultimately, the police is not there to help with that.

    It's also beyond fucked up that they're prevent people from taking matters into their own hands. Imagine firefighters handcuffing volunteers who run into the burning building to safe someone. How cruel would that be? (Granted, firefighters don't fuck around with fire, and if they don't want to go into that building, no unprotected and untrained civilian should. But then, I'd trust the firefighters' judgement and I wouldn't trust the police's. There's a reason there's no rap song called "Fuck the Fire Department", and all that.)

    Then again, the more I hear about the police in the US, the more depressing the thought of living there becomes. It's a nightmare what they can do and what they can get away with scot-free.

    14 votes
  16. Comment on Weekly megathread for news/updates/discussion of Russian invasion of Ukraine - June 3 in ~news

    ThatFanficGuy
    Link Parent
    Everything I've read so far suggests that the economy is propped up, and very much not in recovery. This applies both to the ruble (which has stabilized to levels even better than post-Crimea),...

    I'm surprised how well Russia recovered from its economical wounds

    Everything I've read so far suggests that the economy is propped up, and very much not in recovery. This applies both to the ruble (which has stabilized to levels even better than post-Crimea), and to the economy in general. The government is trying to bandage over intense structural damage that becomes more and more apparent day by day.

    Having no economic education or insight, I can only speculate that what perceived damage Russian economy had suffered at the very start of the war was exaggerated, and that things are getting worse over time. The sudden withdrawal of a lot of USD and EUR in cash, coupled with the brain drain, were two great (and conjunct) events, but not meteoric in consequence. Which is to say: it wouldn't be fair to consider one massive splash a starting point from which all further deterioration is measured. Instead, I would suggest that it'd kickstarted the long progress of unravelling, and it would indeed take time for the economy to collapse.

    I am also surprised how well propaganda is working on the common Russian people right now - you'd think they'd be more cynical.

    They are cynical. They've also been spoon-fed the state-sponsored bullshit at a time where there's a lot of uncertainty and a lot of sudden shifts in one's daily life. All that, after having no interest in looking at things critically for a very long time. Which isn't to say Russia would have been more democratic if only had BBC produced more content for the market. It's to say that existential stress does funny things to people's psyche, especially those to whom it's clear they can't really leave.

    Russians are a nation of survivors. Enduring centuries of bullshit from their governments does that to a people. This may look like laziness or complacency to the Western, politically-engaged observer. To me, it looks more like the psyche of a broken, abused nation that has not had time to heal in any meaningful way yet.

    I could be wrong. I guess I just don't want to imagine the entire nation being embodied by a psychopath with an AK-74 in a Soviet-era helmet who came into Ukraine to loot, torture, maim, rape, and murder.

    11 votes
  17. Comment on Mass shooters overwhelmingly fit a certain profile in ~life

    ThatFanficGuy
    Link Parent
    Existential pessimism is hardly a path worth taking. Compassion is a scarce resource when you have to worry about losing a job, worry about finding a job, worry about having somewhere to stay to...

    Existential pessimism is hardly a path worth taking.

    Compassion is a scarce resource when you have to worry about losing a job, worry about finding a job, worry about having somewhere to stay to keep the job, worry about having something to eat, worry about paying off a degree you may not want or need, worry about paying off staggering medical debts that few other countries even see, worry about (perceptions of) crime, worry about having clean water...

    A lot of these worries – and many more yet to be listed – arise from a skewed set of incentives in politics. Those in power are not strongly incentivized to maintain the wellbeing of those who elected them. They are, however, strongly incentivized to pave way for large, semi-independent corporations after accepting money that are bribes in anything but the name.

    Nation-level effects are systemic, and must be addressed by addressing the system that enables them. Easing up social tensions would provide a lot of room for expression, and something tells me compassion would be high on the list of things that fill it.

    11 votes
  18. Comment on What is the Cyrillic alphabet? in ~humanities

    ThatFanficGuy
    Link Parent
    Which is how all Russians would approximate it. Despite the Greek origins of Cyrillic (and the presence of a theta derivative as a letter of the alphabet up to a certain point), there's no close...

    Which is how all Russians would approximate it.

    Despite the Greek origins of Cyrillic (and the presence of a theta derivative as a letter of the alphabet up to a certain point), there's no close approximation of the voiceless dental fricative [θ]. The closest we get is the letter Ф, also of Greek origin, representing the [f] sound, which is a voiceless labiodental fricative, and it's not close enough to replace [θ] in a Russian native speaker's English pronunciation.

    2 votes
  19. Comment on What is the Cyrillic alphabet? in ~humanities

    ThatFanficGuy
    Link Parent
    The Russian language has a long tradition of adapting foreign languages to the Russian speaker's tongue during translation. For a native Russian speaker, it would be easier to comprehend and say...

    The Russian language has a long tradition of adapting foreign languages to the Russian speaker's tongue during translation. For a native Russian speaker, it would be easier to comprehend and say "вокзал" than "воксхол" (which is how you would transcribe Vauxhall in Russian).

    It would be a straightforward affair to simply transliterate a foreign personal name. It is, however, not how languages work, at least up until fairly recently. Bear in mind that a particular tsar of Russia was not named Nicholas II from birth: his name was Nikolai II, yet his name was "adapted" to the English audience to make it seem that much less intimidating. (Human history is really that of conquering the unknown.) The same applies to the Russian language.

    In Russian, the last name of the famous German physicist is pronounced /ein-SHTEIN/, while in English it's /AIN-stain/. In German, it's /AIN-shtain/.

    For what it's worth, I find it easier to pronounce "гамбургер" than I do "хамбургер". It feels like that much more effort. So my guess is: the translators figured the same went along the path of least resistance. (Which was likely there because the the city from which the dish get its name is also called Гамбург in Russian, even though the German pronunciation of Hamburg clearly favors the [h] sound.)

    4 votes
  20. Comment on What is the Cyrillic alphabet? in ~humanities

    ThatFanficGuy
    Link Parent
    sir you are upstaging me right now Funny enough, Russian also refers to the letter Y (the Latin one, as used in e.g. mathematics) as "игрек", which I suspect is pronounced quite like its French...

    sir you are upstaging me right now

    In french, we call that letter "I-grec", or "Greek 'I'".

    Funny enough, Russian also refers to the letter Y (the Latin one, as used in e.g. mathematics) as "игрек", which I suspect is pronounced quite like its French equivalent.

    6 votes