grungegun's recent activity

  1. Comment on 'Demon Slayer' becomes Japan's highest-grossing film of all time in ~anime

    grungegun
    Link Parent
    up until? The spider forest is easily the best part. I didn't care much about it for the most parts, but ep 18 and 19 are easily the best part of s1. I skipped everything after that, but ep 18 and...

    up until?

    The spider forest is easily the best part. I didn't care much about it for the most parts, but ep 18 and 19 are easily the best part of s1. I skipped everything after that, but ep 18 and 19 are definitely worthwhile.

    2 votes
  2. Comment on Norway has banned hate speech against bisexual and trans people in a landmark change to its penal code in ~lgbt

    grungegun
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    Are LGBT+ the only hate-speech protected categories? Or are there more (racial, ethnic, religious, etc) currently protected in Norway?

    Are LGBT+ the only hate-speech protected categories? Or are there more (racial, ethnic, religious, etc) currently protected in Norway?

    5 votes
  3. Comment on Can lab-grown brains become conscious? in ~science

    grungegun
    Link Parent
    Neither you nor @mrbig have defined what efficiency means yet with relation to God. All current definitions are in relation to finite processes, it's unclear how that definition extends to...

    Neither you nor @mrbig have defined what efficiency means yet with relation to God. All current definitions are in relation to finite processes, it's unclear how that definition extends to something infinite. Things are usually efficient with regards to a goal, so at minimum there has to be a stated goal for God for the word efficient to make sense,

    1 vote
  4. Comment on Teardown preview - A voxel ray-traced game on PC with next-generation destruction and physics in ~games

    grungegun
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    The biggest problem with voxels is that they tend to be 'locked' to the grid of the game world. Teardown allows you to escape that, but basically what it does is it checks to see if a group of...

    The biggest problem with voxels is that they tend to be 'locked' to the grid of the game world. Teardown allows you to escape that, but basically what it does is it checks to see if a group of voxels is separated from the game world, then treats that group separately.

    In my opinion, the real MVP here is implementing physics calculations on the GPU.

    Edit: it allows more interactions than just that, but those tend to be despite voxels, rather than enhanced by them.

    4 votes
  5. Comment on Can lab-grown brains become conscious? in ~science

    grungegun
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    For those who are interested, this view is known as functionalism. One variant of functionalism is that the consciousness is the result of a complicated state machine, which is what I assume bloup...

    For those who are interested, this view is known as functionalism.
    One variant of functionalism is that the consciousness is the result of a complicated state machine, which is what I assume bloup subscribes to given his marble analogy.

    An issue (in my mind) with this, is given anything sufficiently complicated, like a large pile of bricks, you could define states as collections of thermo-dynamic microstates of the bricks. Then, with a good enough definition, you could, for a few seconds, get the appropriate transitions that a conscious minimal state machine would require.

    As a result Boltzman brains are present everywhere. (Just the brains, not the whole thought experiment.) Further, your brain could be composed of multiple consciousnesses at the same time, however only one is causally effective - controlling your limbs.

    This isn't a contradiction, but in my opinion it seems unlikely. One escape is to insist on a causal connection, but that quickly brings you into the realm of panpsychism.

    The issue is not that we want to define what consciousness is. Instead, we should try to define what morally significant consciousness is. With my example of a pile of bricks., kicking it over creates as many conscious entities as it destroys, which isn't very helpful. I tend to agree with Chalmers about the hardness of defining it. I haven't finished his book yet, so, for now, I'm pretty sure I'll disagree with his solution.

    4 votes
  6. Comment on Oregon legalizes psilocybin mushrooms (for therapeutic purposes) and decriminalizes all drugs in ~health

    grungegun
    Link Parent
    The Wire managed to pull me from uncertain -> decriminalize. If you know someone who thinks this is a bad idea, I'd suggest watching that show with them.

    The Wire managed to pull me from uncertain -> decriminalize. If you know someone who thinks this is a bad idea, I'd suggest watching that show with them.

    4 votes
  7. Comment on Did any Tilders vote for Trump? And if so, why? in ~talk

    grungegun
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    I voted for Jo Jorgensen and party line Republican for everything else. But everyone I know voted Trump. (I may regret posting this and delete it later.) I am not a libertarian, but fall into a...

    I voted for Jo Jorgensen and party line Republican for everything else. But everyone I know voted Trump. (I may regret posting this and delete it later.) I am not a libertarian, but fall into a social constructivist conservative category, however, i know theonomists, libertarians, principled conservatives, and pro-Trumpers, as well as a lot of single issue voters.

    4 votes
  8. Comment on A libertarian walks into a bear: The utopian plot to liberate an American town (and some bears) in ~humanities

    grungegun
    Link Parent
    The reason I put as much effort into the argument as I did was not because of the article specifically. Every once in a while, I start a project in-depth argument to see if it's possible to have a...

    The reason I put as much effort into the argument as I did was not because of the article specifically. Every once in a while, I start a project in-depth argument to see if it's possible to have a coherent debate on the internet without it descending into name-calling and lol-ing. I stop when the person stops defending their position or I'm convinced of what they say (which has happened). Most of the time it ends with the other person saying lol and stopping without explanation. Sometimes I concede.

    I find posting online nerve-wracking and exhausting, which is why I do it.

    1 vote
  9. Comment on The 100 best fantasy books of all time in ~books

  10. Comment on New Zealand now has the gayest Parliament in the world in ~lgbt

  11. Comment on What have you been watching / reading this week? (Anime/Manga) in ~anime

    grungegun
    Link Parent
    Neat, I haven't seen that yet. On a scale of powerpoint to OPM/Cowboy Bebop how good is the animation? (artstyle aside)

    Neat, I haven't seen that yet. On a scale of powerpoint to OPM/Cowboy Bebop how good is the animation?
    (artstyle aside)

    2 votes
  12. Comment on Bad arguments against teaching Chinese philosophy in ~humanities

  13. Comment on Bad arguments against teaching Chinese philosophy in ~humanities

    grungegun
    Link Parent
    I take a broad view of what philosophy is, and a large part of Western philosophy is centered around the examined my life. So, where with tennis and squash it's like asking: "Why should I play...

    I take a broad view of what philosophy is, and a large part of Western philosophy is centered around the examined my life. So, where with tennis and squash it's like asking:
    "Why should I play tennis if it won't change how I play squash?" which is basically (looking up what squash is)
    "Why should I play tennis if it won't change how I hit the ball with a net in a four walled court?"
    in contrast, the question:
    "Why shouuld I learn Indian/Dharmic philosophy if it won't change something I believe from Western philosophy?" becomes
    "Why should I learn Indian/Dharmic philosophy if it won't change how I examine my life?"
    I think that this last question is reasonable, I could be mistaken, and if you tell me that Indian/Dharmic philosophies do not help you to examine your life better, I will accept that.

    Also, in the quote you took, I was asking for an idea that you had taken to be true. Are you saying that you don't have any examples of this?

    Thanks!

    3 votes
  14. Comment on A libertarian walks into a bear: The utopian plot to liberate an American town (and some bears) in ~humanities

    grungegun
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    mkay, I'm not a libertarian, but you didn't respond to the content of my post, or (since it is funny) to why it's not deserving of response. I guess this is a good place to stop.

    mkay, I'm not a libertarian, but you didn't respond to the content of my post, or (since it is funny) to why it's not deserving of response. I guess this is a good place to stop.

    1 vote
  15. Comment on A libertarian walks into a bear: The utopian plot to liberate an American town (and some bears) in ~humanities

    grungegun
    Link Parent
    Thanks for the clarification, I realized it was a response to my comment, I'm just emphasizing you intended in sharing the article. It's fine to share an article because it's funny. The form of a...

    Thanks for the clarification, I realized it was a response to my comment, I'm just emphasizing you intended in sharing the article. It's fine to share an article because it's funny.

    The form of a lot of propaganda is a caricaturization of the opponent in an anecdote, true or otherwise, in this case true. The effect of this type of propaganda is to entrench each type further. Take caricatures of Islam after 9/11, true anecdotes about evil muslims abounded in a roughly analogous case. Also, I think we can agree that pastors giving anecdotes in church about the evil relativists trying to get rid of truth qualify as propaganda too. We can list out some of their properties:

    Opposite side: libertarian muslim sermons on evil relativists
    True anecdote? yes yes yes
    Generalizes ideology? yes yes yes
    disaster in the end? yes yes yes
    shows other side wrong? yes yes yes
    Further entrenches? ? yes yes
    Informative of opp side? no no no

    From what we've discussed so far, 1-5 seem to match up pretty well. Additionally, you agreed that the article didn't delineate anarchists and libertarians well, which almost gives 7, there may be some weight associated with the failure being true, but since the article lacked statistical sourcing, which gives 7.

    However, the most important point is 6. If the article succeeds in helping to detrench one viewpoint, then it's working towards something, which wouldn't be propaganda.

    The reason I enumerated the groups of readers was to establish 6 matched, which in my mind would check al the boxes. I tried to outline some broad groups of readers and establish what the reactions of those groups (libertarians angry, others more dismissive of libertarians). You appear to agree with me on that.

    So, with 6 parallels between this article and instances of propaganda, I'm inclined to classify it as just that. This doesn't mean the article is bad, I go to church and have listened to litanies against relativism, so I would be hypocritical in uniformly denouncing propaganda. It doesn't mean it's wrong. It's also still funny, it just happens to also be propaganda.

  16. Comment on Bad arguments against teaching Chinese philosophy in ~humanities

    grungegun
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    ok, the order I'll do this is: introduce bare bones definition of value -> introduce expected value -> introduce value of objects relative to a person -> use this to analyze my position -> use...

    ok, the order I'll do this is: introduce bare bones definition of value -> introduce expected value -> introduce value of objects relative to a person -> use this to analyze my position -> use this to analyze how your arguments affect my definition. -> conclusion. Note that your arguments still apply to generic definitions, I will admit that. However, my point of argument is over the following definition.

    Prioritization in time implies an implicit assignment of value (the definition I've been working with). So, if two events are ordered A <_t B, then I say their value is A >_v B. I'm taking value as an undefined term and assigning it a new meaning value'. I'm still going to refer to it as value, since I typed it up that way, but please have value' or expected value' in mind in everything I said previously and what i am about to say.

    Using my definition of value, things which you do sooner are more valuable, this makes sense linguistically since both value and prioritization constitute total orderings. Now, the extension of this is expected value which comes from expected prioritization. Expected prioritization is the expectation of ordering what you are about to do.

    Note that this is dependent on time and the person. Groups of things - reading book1 and reading book2 can not generally be ordered. Consider interleaving sessions of book1 and book2. However, if all sessions of reading book1 are expected to be sooner than all sessions of book2, then we can write reading book1 <_t book2 which is to say book1 >_v book2. That's with respect to a single person, in a specific moment of time, but it allows us to correlate types over our partial ordering.

    Note that the domain of this ordering is everything you intend to do and that value is well defined on that.

    Then, is is definitionally true that I assign some value to books I have not read, but intend to. In the same way, you assign value to African philosophy since you intend to do it. Further, you assign value to it relative to other things. Now, I want to emphasize here that this statement is true by definition, based on the my stated definition of value

    Now, note that your objection from assigning value to an unknown unknown fails against this definition.

    With this clarified definition in mind, by putting off studying African philosophy, you are valuing it less than whatever you do sooner than it. Similarly, I definitionally expect a certain value for African philosophy, and I believe that value is justified to be lower than Aristotle (this is not definitionally true). However, if I consider studying Aristotle separately from African philosophy, I implicitly expect different values from each one (definitionally true).

    Suppose I take an unknown unknown as having greater expected value than a known over some afore specified domain. Since this argument is agnostic to the content of either activity, it generalizes to all activities, this implies that, using value*, I should never do anything in the specified domain that I have experience with, which would imply that I never build on knowledge. So, in value*, this leads to something rather ridiculous. Determining information about something ahead of time is however reasonable.

    Notes:
    Rereading books causes some issues, so I'm going to leave that out for now, unless you want clarification on that.
    You may comment that my evaluation of your argument does not use your definition. That is true, I freely admit that, as long as your definition of value is not the same as my definition of value as value*, your argument that assigning value is nonsense holds. If you intend to critique my definition of value however, you have to critique value*.

    Thanks for coming to my TedTalk :) again, no avarice. I tend to have different understanding of terms though due to my background. If you want to revise your argument to address what I gave, I'd be happy to respond. Just, as stated what you said doesn't address what I was thinking in my head on writing my post.

    4 votes
  17. Comment on Bad arguments against teaching Chinese philosophy in ~humanities

    grungegun
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    I would characterize it as efficient, rather than close minded. I have close to 150 books sitting next to me on my shelf. I have another 300 on my kindle. As I read, I will accumulate more books...

    I would characterize it as efficient, rather than close minded. I have close to 150 books sitting next to me on my shelf. I have another 300 on my kindle. As I read, I will accumulate more books to read from the ones I'm already reading. If I was immortal, I wouldn't be asking these questions, but I'm going to die, so I need to prioritize.

    lack of knowledge or appreciation about something doesn't make said thing inherently new, or un-valuable

    No, but it does make its value uncertain. I'm interested in mathematical philosophy (not philosophy of mathematics) It's unclear to me whether African philsophy will significantly impact my thinking in this area.

    To change the nature of the question somewhat, should I approach every reddit post with open-mindedness? That is, I should assume every single one has something potentially valuable in it. No, that would take me forever. Another example, should I read Lenin's books (if he wrote any)? No, they don't pertain to my particular situation. These are examples or what we might call useful close-mindedness.

    Your characterization of open-mindedness is to assign equal value based on hearsay. I need to prioritize, and currently I have strong evidence of worth through a short reading (Aristotle) and weak evidence of worth through hearsay, and people rattling off lists of names.

    Aristotle didn't suddenly come up with something of worth when you discovered him.

    I agree. The Expectation of value from my perspective increased. And without me being shown that specific instance of quality, my exception would have remained low. I think my opinion before that was rational and well-motivated based on current evidence, since almost everyone I had talked to considered Aristotle interesting in a historical sense, which was not a fit for me. I also choose books based on their cover, because in my experience, classic works have better illustrations, while books with shirtless men on their covers are generally poorly written.

    Edit: also, this is not intended to be snipey. I know that some people are concerned about hostility, but this is just my writing style.

    2 votes
  18. Comment on Bad arguments against teaching Chinese philosophy in ~humanities

    grungegun
    Link Parent
    The people being interviewed might voice that, but that's not what I'm doing. I'm asking for a specific example of something great from <example foreign philosophical tradition> If they discuss...

    The people being interviewed might voice that, but that's not what I'm doing. I'm asking for a specific example of something great from <example foreign philosophical tradition>

    If they discuss the same issues, the author just has to bring up some line where a departure occurs, which is unexpected and surprising. (I assume that the two traditions didn't emerge in lockstep fashion.)

    If they discuss different issues. Then the author simply has to note how this different issue conflicts with a Western issue on a standard problem of the human experience. (morality is a great example here.)

    New things need starters. I ignored anime until OPM+Cowboy Bebop. Convincing me to watch anime based on generic statements about unique plot and visuals didn't work, an actual instance of something thrilling did. I believe that if the author came up with a starter, (Western Philosophy at least has tons of interesting thought cases to pull people in.) then people would have an easier time of caring.

    Like why read Aristotle? No clue, then our teacher made us read a section with the advert - Aristotle shows every major argument for and against private property that you've ever heard and better in two pages. It took one period, but at the end, I thought - I didn't care for Aristotle before, because there was nothing evidently of worth that he proposed and most people just rag on him as a historical artifact, but that was the best analysis of private property I've ever read.

    I am now interested in Aristotle.

    5 votes
  19. Comment on The dangerous rise of military AI: Autonomous machines capable of deadly force are increasingly prevalent in modern warfare, despite numerous ethical concerns in ~tech

    grungegun
    (edited )
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    Chamayou seems to know where it's at. Eventually, there may not be solders. Then the two options are targeting civilians or industrial societies paying to test which of their tech toys can outdo...

    Chamayou seems to know where it's at. Eventually, there may not be solders. Then the two options are targeting civilians or industrial societies paying to test which of their tech toys can outdo the other.

    As far as getting at the programmers, I imagine that the corporation behind the glitch would be held responsible, but no specific person would be charged with the glitch that caused the drone to malfunction and kill dozens.

    Drone warfare is eventually a guaranteed occurrence. Once it becomes cheap and efficient enough, it can be argued for on the grounds of murder. You are sentencing your own soldiers to die for the same outcome as if you had used robots.

    A commenter on reddit also noted that this makes escalations harder and colder, since sniping down a drone doesn't cause any human death, and is harder to rile people up with.

    2 votes
  20. Comment on Bad arguments against teaching Chinese philosophy in ~humanities

    grungegun
    Link Parent
    OK, I'm willing. Sell me. Give a specific idea in African philosophy, not found in Western philosophy, that you have come to accept as true. Also, what did that idea replace?

    OK, I'm willing. Sell me.

    Give a specific idea in African philosophy, not found in Western philosophy, that you have come to accept as true. Also, what did that idea replace?

    4 votes