mono's recent activity

  1. Comment on What memo did you not get? in ~talk

    mono
    Link
    How to properly use rubber cement. For projects in high school, I'd always slather it on and stick while it was wet. I didn't learn until college that you're supposed to slather it on, let it dry...

    How to properly use rubber cement.

    For projects in high school, I'd always slather it on and stick while it was wet. I didn't learn until college that you're supposed to slather it on, let it dry a bit and get tacky, then stick the pieces together. It makes a huge difference.

    13 votes
  2. Comment on 2020 Election News and Information (Week of October 18th) in ~news

    mono
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    That map is based on flat averages of the latest poll from each polling firm. It's bound to be super sensitive to noise and bad quality/partisan polling. I wouldn't put any stock in any small...

    270 to win Polling map shows both WI and PA flipping between to close to call and slight blue.

    That map is based on flat averages of the latest poll from each polling firm. It's bound to be super sensitive to noise and bad quality/partisan polling. I wouldn't put any stock in any small short-term shifting you see on it.

    • The average includes the most recent poll from each source within the past 30 days, up to a maximum of five. If five polls are found, and there are other qualifying polls on that same calendar date, those will also be included.
    4 votes
  3. Comment on Trump/Biden 2020 Presidential Debate #2 Discussion Thread in ~talk

    mono
    Link
    The first 45 minutes or so, I thought Trump was actually acting like an adult, for once. But he apparently can't keep up the act for much longer than that.

    The first 45 minutes or so, I thought Trump was actually acting like an adult, for once. But he apparently can't keep up the act for much longer than that.

    16 votes
  4. Comment on Trump/Biden 2020 Presidential Debate #2 Discussion Thread in ~talk

    mono
    Link Parent
    I'm pretty confident Biden is going to win, but I'm anxious nonetheless. I also think Dems have a really good shot taking control of the Senate or at least splitting it, but I'm more emotionally...

    I'm pretty confident Biden is going to win, but I'm anxious nonetheless. I also think Dems have a really good shot taking control of the Senate or at least splitting it, but I'm more emotionally prepared to handle that not happening.

    More than anything, I just can't wait for the election to be over and done with, honestly. Biden and Dem control isn't going to be a magic wand or anything, but I just need to return to a world where my head-of-state isn't embarrassingly stupid and pathologically narcissistic.

    14 votes
  5. Comment on In Louisiana, Cajuns are keen to preserve their identity in ~humanities

    mono
    Link Parent
    Hello fellow Acadian! I have a direct paternal line to the Acadians who were exiled from Nova Scotia to Louisiana. Like you, I'm sort of Cajun adjacent though, because my ancestors settled and...

    Hello fellow Acadian! I have a direct paternal line to the Acadians who were exiled from Nova Scotia to Louisiana. Like you, I'm sort of Cajun adjacent though, because my ancestors settled and continued to live just a little bit more eastward, along the Mississippi, and were never really steeped in Cajun culture. I was born and raised in Greater New Orleans, and my mom's side is more Creole so I always identified more with Creole heritage than Cajun.

    3 votes
  6. Comment on Trump & Biden 2020 US Presidential Town Halls Discussion Thread in ~talk

    mono
    Link Parent
    I disagree that Biden's answer was that bad or that the asker was necessarily disappointed with it. Here's a link to it. The question was, The first thing he says is a quote from John Lewis about...

    I disagree that Biden's answer was that bad or that the asker was necessarily disappointed with it. Here's a link to it. The question was,

    Besides 'you ain't black,' what do you have to say to young black voters who see voting for you as further participation in a system that continually fails to protect them.

    The first thing he says is a quote from John Lewis about how much the black vote can determine the election, which is the crux of what the Kerry Washington tweet says. He then explains that, in addition to criminal justice reform, an important aspect of making things more fair is help black Americans build wealth. He elaborates that that entails better education, better mental health care and drug rehabilitation, guaranteeing down payments for first time home buyers, and small business programs. He goes on further to acknowledge systemic racism in things like the real estate market.

    It was a full five minute answer and very dense with substance. Sure, it wasn't a very emotional appeal, but I don't think touchy-feely platitudes about race that black people hear all the time from politicians would've done any good. Biden specifically acknowledged (some of) the problems and laid out solutions.

    To me, the asker didn't seem defeated. He seemed maybe a little overwhelmed, and he was sort of put on the spot by Stephanopoulos to say if he was satisfied or not before he could process everything. And obviously, talking about disaffected black voters deserves way more than a five minute monologue so of course they both probably had more they would've liked to have said.

    7 votes
  7. Comment on Facebook and Twitter take unusual steps to limit spread of New York Post story in ~tech

    mono
    Link
    An interview between a group of reporters and the repair shop owner has been published. It's hard to listen to this and not feel that there's something fishy going on. He won't say exactly how or...

    An interview between a group of reporters and the repair shop owner has been published. It's hard to listen to this and not feel that there's something fishy going on.

    He won't say exactly how or why he became suspicious of the content on the laptop. He won't say whether the emails in question were physically saved to the hard drive or why they would be. He says he was worried about his life "if people knew what [he] knew," but that he sought attention from the authorities because "[he] just wanted it out of his shop." He outright refuses to acknowledge the contradiction.

    He says he asks some unknown person he trusts to bring them to the attention of the FBI and that FBI agents subsequently contacted him at least twice asking for tech help (what power cable to use). He can't confirm whether or not they were real FBI agents. He eventually becomes suspicious that the FBI is covering the whole thing up, and that's he worried they're going to retaliate for speaking about his involvement. He refuses to explicitly say whether he contacted Giuliani or vice versa after he concludes the FBI isn't doing anything, but seems to admit to contacting Giuliani supposedly because he felt unsafe. He refuses to say why he'd go to Giuliani if he felt his life was at risk, but says he has no opinion on Giuliani's lawyer sharing everything with NYP, making his involvement with all of this public.

    He doesn't seem like he's the mastermind behind a disinformation plot, but he's clearly not being forthright.

    10 votes
  8. Comment on Fortnightly Programming Q&A Thread in ~comp

    mono
    Link Parent
    Up for Grabs lists projects which have curated tasks specifically for new contributors. Good First Issue does more or less the same.

    Up for Grabs lists projects which have curated tasks specifically for new contributors. Good First Issue does more or less the same.

    3 votes
  9. Comment on Trump will undergo televised medical evaluation on Friday night, Fox News announces in ~news

    mono
    Link Parent
    Firstly, I don't think it's fair to extrapolate media sentiment to a general consensus, especially not amongst the medical community. Secondly, the quote was from March 6th. China had about 80k...

    Firstly, I don't think it's fair to extrapolate media sentiment to a general consensus, especially not amongst the medical community.

    Secondly, the quote was from March 6th. China had about 80k reported cases. There were already outbreaks in Europe and Iran. The first U.S. death had already occurred, and there was that huge outbreak on a cruise ship. The WHO declared a pandemic only a few days later.

    Lastly, whatever degree COVID-19 was believed to be not as bad as the flu didn't justify dismissing the risk when, unlike the flu, we knew hardly anything about it and there isn't a vaccine.

    13 votes
  10. Comment on Trump will undergo televised medical evaluation on Friday night, Fox News announces in ~news

    mono
    Link Parent
    He's also written a few books: What an odd coincidence!

    He's also written a few books:

    False Alarm: The Truth about the Epidemic of Fear (2005, link)
    Inside flap:
    Life today for citizens of the developed world is far safer, easier, and healthier than for any other people in history. Modern medicine has all but wiped out many diseases that once were common killers. Science and technology have given us countless devices that protect our bodies from injury, secure our property, and warn us of impending disaster. And modern intelligence gathering can pinpoint threats to our domestic security as they arise. So why is an epidemic of fear sweeping America?
    The answer, according to nationally renowned health commentator Dr. Marc Siegel, is that we live in an artificially created culture of fear.From the anthrax panic to the SARS "epidemic," from "official" rumors of bioterror to Orange alerts to West Nile virus-- the media continually bombard us with breaking news of yet another super-bug, terrorist plot, or natural disaster that's about to wreak havoc. Most of the time the disasters never materialize. But even if they did, the odds that any of us would suffer harm from them is infinitesimally small-- especially when compared to the much greater risks of dying in a car accident or from coronary heart disease.

    Bird Flu: Everything You Need to Know About the Next Pandemic (2006, link)
    Editorial review:
    The most important thing to know about the avian flu pandemic is that it probably ain't coming, argues this brisk debunking of the latest medical scare story. Siegel, an associate professor at the NYU School of Medicine (False Alarm: The Truth About the Epidemic of Fear), cites evidence that the death rate from avian flu could be much lower than the reported estimate of 50% and it will probably not mutate to be readily transmissible between humans. And unlike the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic, Siegel contends, a new bird flu pandemic would face effective public health measures and medical treatments. Revisiting the West Nile virus, anthrax, SARS and bioterrorism panics, Siegel sees bird flu as the latest "bug du jour" hyped by government and media alarmism. Meanwhile, he complains, attention is diverted from far more deadly diseases like AIDS, malaria and regular flu. In his own lapse into medical panic, he insists that stress induced by medical panics is itself a serious medical problem.

    Swine Flu: The New Pandemic (2009, link)
    Without minimizing the risk for current strains of H1N1 to become more dangerous, author and physician Siegel (Bird Flu: Everything You Need to Know About the Next Pandemic) offers a calming dose of reality regarding swine flu; while ""we need to be in awe of the potential for damage,"" Siegel prescribes ""learning to understand why the likelihood of the worst case coming to pass is awfully low."" A practicing internist, associate professor and newspaper columnist (as well as a parent), Siegel addresses many common concerns over the H1N1 pandemic, giving clear explanations about the nature of the virus, historical examples, risk factors, available treatments, and more. He also explains how the 1918 flu pandemic killed as many as 50 million people-the chaotic aftermath of WWI played no small part-and how the present pandemic is simply incomparable. Breaking down the science of virus transmission, Siegel explains the conditions by which H1N1 could mutate into something more dangerous, as well as the anti-viral drug, Tamiflu, and the swine flu vaccine (and how the vaccine's safety is being assured).Taking a balanced approach, Siegel offers a realistic and concise guide for any concerned citizen.

    What an odd coincidence!

    15 votes
  11. Comment on Trump will undergo televised medical evaluation on Friday night, Fox News announces in ~news

    mono
    Link
    Dr. Marc Siegel, MD, the doctor who will be performing the evaluation, is a practicing internist boarded in Internal Medicine, based in New York City. He's the Clinical Professor, Department of...
    • Exemplary

    Dr. Marc Siegel, MD, the doctor who will be performing the evaluation, is a practicing internist boarded in Internal Medicine, based in New York City. He's the Clinical Professor, Department of Medicine at NYU Grossman School of Medicine, and Clinical Professional Coordinator, NYU Langone Medical Center on the Sirius Radio Project.

    He's also been a FOX News medical contributor since 2008, often appearing on Tucker Carlson's show, and has also contributed to the Wall Street Journal and National Review.

    In March, he said, "there's no reason to believe [COVID-19 is] actually more problematic or deadly than influenza," and he has strongly advocated for hydroxychloroquine.

    In July, in an interview on Tucker Carlson's show, Trump said to Siegal, "I watch you all the time. You're almost like my guide to this, 'cause frankly you really have a good take on it."

    So, clearly, he's totally independent and unbiased, and we can trust everything he says.

    32 votes
  12. Comment on What social norm(s) you would like to see changed? in ~talk

    mono
    Link Parent
    Out of context, those are inherently accusatory questions, and once again, they're not the sort of thing people are advocating for. You may experience it, and that's sad, but if you believe that...

    Out of context, those are inherently accusatory questions, and once again, they're not the sort of thing people are advocating for. You may experience it, and that's sad, but if you believe that there is a push to encourage that, you are mistaken.

    That said, there is nothing wrong with giving boys the opportunity to express their feelings and taking an interest in them. A parent asking their son, "Would you like to talk about your grandmother dying?" or "You don't seem as happy now as you were as a child. Are you okay? Would you like to talk about it?" would make a world of difference in people's relationships with their parents.

    Also, why didn't you lead with those examples instead of "masturbating to teletubbies?"

    2 votes
  13. Comment on What social norm(s) you would like to see changed? in ~talk

    mono
    Link Parent
    Masturbation isn't implicitly synonymous with love. Maybe try doing a better job making your point.

    Masturbation isn't implicitly synonymous with love. Maybe try doing a better job making your point.

    4 votes
  14. Comment on What social norm(s) you would like to see changed? in ~talk

    mono
    Link Parent
    I'm not sure boys' masturbation habits are what most people would normally refer to as an emotion. At the very least, no one is saying they should be forced to talk about them.

    I'm not sure boys' masturbation habits are what most people would normally refer to as an emotion. At the very least, no one is saying they should be forced to talk about them.

    6 votes
  15. Comment on Trump abruptly scraps stimulus talks, punting on economic relief until after Election Day in ~news

    mono
    Link Parent
    He tweeted this literally three days ago:

    He tweeted this literally three days ago:

    OUR GREAT USA WANTS & NEEDS STIMULUS. WORK TOGETHER AND GET IT DONE. Thank you!

    6 votes
  16. Comment on Joe Biden can end the drama on election night. All he has to do is win Texas. in ~news

    mono
    Link Parent
    I wonder if there's a point where excessive advertising actively hurts campaigns. I live in a solid red state so there's never much for presidential races here, but some state elections, we'll get...

    I wonder if there's a point where excessive advertising actively hurts campaigns. I live in a solid red state so there's never much for presidential races here, but some state elections, we'll get a candidate who just barrages the airwaves and mailboxes with spam. It's so f'ing annoying, I love seeing them lose almost just for the sake of shutting them up, but maybe that's just me.

    Even for those that support them, though, I wouldn't be surprised if it exhausts many to the point political apathy.

    3 votes
  17. Comment on What are some good recommendations for ambient background music? in ~music

    mono
    (edited )
    Link
    Hiroshi Yoshimura. Pretty ambient and spacey. I would definitely consider this pleasant. Steve Roach. Super "ethereal," but maybe more neutral than you're looking for. Brian Eno, of course. Edit:...

    Hiroshi Yoshimura. Pretty ambient and spacey. I would definitely consider this pleasant.

    Steve Roach. Super "ethereal," but maybe more neutral than you're looking for.

    Brian Eno, of course.

    Edit: Also, if you'd be interested in creating some of your own ambient music, you should know about a program known as Paulstretch. It allows you to stretch audio to an extreme degree, producing really high quality ambient textures. If you pick the right audio source, you can get some downright heavenly stuff. Check out an Imogen Heap song paulstretched. Clair de Lune. Pyramid Song by Radiohead.

    4 votes
  18. Comment on Tracker for coronavirus test results from officials in the US government and presidential campaigns in ~news

    mono
    Link
    The New York Times also has a good contact tracer and timeline.

    The New York Times also has a good contact tracer and timeline.

    3 votes
  19. Comment on The non-voter in ~humanities

    mono
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    It's kind of a self-fulfilling prophecy though. Elected officials cater most to people that can potentially elect them. Demographics that don't show up to the polls are ignored because they offer...

    It's kind of a self-fulfilling prophecy though. Elected officials cater most to people that can potentially elect them. Demographics that don't show up to the polls are ignored because they offer no electoral advantage. Not voting doesn't work as a protest against the status quo because it's practically indistinguishable from apathy.

    ‘We had a black president and I still working for eight dollars per hour and nothing has changed. Nothing. Ain’t nothing changed.

    Obama didn't accomplish a lot because he was obstructed by a Republican Congress for all but his first two years, and the GOP dominated state and local elections. Electing the president of your choice isn't going to solve a damned thing if the rest of the government is controlled by his or her opponents because their constituencies actually vote and not just for president.

    10 votes
  20. Comment on Trump/Biden 2020 Presidential Debate #1 Discussion Thread in ~talk

    mono
    Link
    538/Ipsos has some post-debate polling and analysis. Unsurprisingly, it doesn't look like it changed very many people's minds. Biden might have had a very slight uptick, and respondents'...

    538/Ipsos has some post-debate polling and analysis.

    Unsurprisingly, it doesn't look like it changed very many people's minds. Biden might have had a very slight uptick, and respondents' confidence in Biden's chances of winning went up a bit.

    Biden was rated higher in terms of performance and policy by a large margin.

    Only about one-third said Trump’s performance was “somewhat good” or “very good,” and 50 percent said it was “very poor.” Biden’s performance was more positively received, with around 60 percent saying they thought he performed well. Respondents gave more mixed grades on how they thought the candidates outlined their policies, but Biden received better marks here, too: Almost 60 percent said they thought his policies were “somewhat good” or “very good,” compared to about 40 percent who said the same for Trump.

    Supporters' of both candidates likelihood of voting are roughly equal and did not change much after the debate.

    Finally, Trump's net favorability dropped 3 points while Biden's grew by 5.

    6 votes