mundane_and_naive's recent activity

  1. Comment on What are your unpopular movie opinions? in ~movies

    mundane_and_naive
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    Reminds me of the hate against CG in anime, that it's cheap, lazy, and ugly. For the most part of the medium's history that seems true. Until recently there's this one anime (Land of the...

    Reminds me of the hate against CG in anime, that it's cheap, lazy, and ugly. For the most part of the medium's history that seems true. Until recently there's this one anime (Land of the Lustruous) that not only use CG exclusively but to great stylistic effect. Now people are warming up to the idea.

    Maybe what we need is one good film with excellent use of HFR and people would be fine with it over time.

    3 votes
  2. Comment on Vektroid - Yr Heart in ~music

    mundane_and_naive
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    I think this youtube comment best describes the song, "like falling in love and flying on a rocket ship at the same time". If anyone got any more of those techno-romantic type music, please let me...

    I think this youtube comment best describes the song, "like falling in love and flying on a rocket ship at the same time".

    If anyone got any more of those techno-romantic type music, please let me know!

    1 vote
  3. Comment on Not every movie must be a melodrama in ~movies

    mundane_and_naive
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    In general, I would agree with you that melodrama is not necessary in sci-fi, or movies in general. However, I have to disagree with your choice of examples here. In Arrival, her marriage with the...

    In general, I would agree with you that melodrama is not necessary in sci-fi, or movies in general. However, I have to disagree with your choice of examples here.

    In Arrival, her marriage with the physicist and the subsequent relationship between her and her daughter is the point. The sci-fi plot introduces us to the concept of non-linear time perception and the family drama is it being applied in a familiar human scenario, putting the theory to the test so to speak. If you can see the future and know what tragedy is waiting ahead, would you still make the decisions that will inevitably lead to said future? The movie argues that you still would. The family drama is necessary to illustrate the serious implication of an otherwise dry and arbitrary concept.

    As for Interstellar, its message is that love transcend space and time. So to illustrate this idea, the movie put the main character in situations where he continuously get separated from humanity and any people he knows, both across vast distance and astronomical stretch of time. Yet in the end, he chooses to make a decision based on the love for his daughter, not knowing if it will amount to anything; and his daughter chooses to follow her hunch that her father communicates with her, despite all logic. You may disagree with the message that the film tries to say, but as far as the message is concerned, the family relationship is what drives the point home and so very much necessary.

    Personally, I'm fine with human dramas in my sci-fi, as long as they're in service of the sci-fi concepts being explored.

    6 votes
  4. Comment on YouTube star PewDiePie has announced he is taking a break from the platform, saying he is "feeling very tired" in ~tech

    mundane_and_naive
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    As a person who is on his way to become one of the old people, I think I can at least sympathize with your concern. I would definitely frown if my little brother start shouting racial slurs in...

    As a person who is on his way to become one of the old people, I think I can at least sympathize with your concern. I would definitely frown if my little brother start shouting racial slurs in order to fit in with his group of friends. You're a teacher, so I understand that you need to uphold a higher standards, and I wouldn't ever tell you to do anything differently. Making fun of people for their races (or gender or any reasons at all for that matter) are wrong, doing whatever a celebrity tells you to do just because it's funny is wrong. I absolutely agree that we all have responsibility to teach this to our children.

    That said, I also think that we really don't need to pay too much attention to Pewdiepie or any other edgy online personalities out there. It used to be that violence in films was the top social concern, then violence in video games. There was a time when a 'Fuck-da-police' attitude was hip and cool. Looking back they're really just fads. I don't think they matters too much. Instead, I think we should focus our attention on the kids around us, make sure they understand that such behaviors are wrong, and trust that they will grow out of it just like we did.

    Both now and then, there are always those who commit acts of extreme violence, seemingly under the influence of these media. However, whenever we look into it, they're never the root cause. Kids turn to violence due to troubled family circumstances, bullying or lack of proper role models in their lives. Adults commit crimes because of distressing social and economical situations. If not Pewdiepie it'd be somthing else. Hate speech is just its expression. Trying to curb the spread of hateful language is treating the symptoms, not the disease. It's worth pursuing but should not be our top priority.

    In a sense, I guess my position is: instead of wasting effort to try and force assholes to stop saying hurtful things in front of our kids, it's more productive to just make sure our kids don't listen to them.

    6 votes
  5. Comment on YouTube star PewDiePie has announced he is taking a break from the platform, saying he is "feeling very tired" in ~tech

    mundane_and_naive
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    Isn't that just a standard diss track, which is like a basic form of rap battle? I'm sorry but this whole thread feels like the classic "old people complaining about how new media are ruining the...

    Isn't that just a standard diss track, which is like a basic form of rap battle? I'm sorry but this whole thread feels like the classic "old people complaining about how new media are ruining the youth". It's a common complaint since forever and never turned out to be the actual cause for any problems ever.

    4 votes
  6. Comment on The Last of Us — The Art of Video Game Storytelling in ~games

    mundane_and_naive
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    This channel usually analyzes film screenplays and here he applied the same treatment for the script of The Last of Us, highlighting the ways a game does screenwriting differently to traditional...

    This channel usually analyzes film screenplays and here he applied the same treatment for the script of The Last of Us, highlighting the ways a game does screenwriting differently to traditional media.


    This got me thinking about the writing process for video games in general. TLoU and many other AAA titles are very close to films, so it makes sense to adopt the screenplay format. But there are also games that don't try to emulate the movie experience necessarily but whose stories are still clearly the focus since the beginning of development. Games like Life is Strange and Telltales' games with lots of dialogue options and branching paths; or games like those by Supergiant where narrations are responsive to a multitude of player's actions and progression while also conveying an overall linear narrative; or experimental games like Gone Home, Her Story, Return of the Obra Dinn... where story elements are disjointed and laid out in such a way that player can technically discover them in any order, but can never accidentally stumble upon key plot reveals... What tools do they use, how do they structure their plot on the page, how do they write in such a way that can account for gameplay options and restrictions while still allowing the writing process to flow naturally? On the more conceptual side, what are some of the literary techniques or story structures that are specific to interactive narratives?

    With the large number of story-focused games nowadays, I wonder if someone out there has put together some sort of comprehensive review of the different tools and techniques that creators have employed when it comes to writing story for games effectively.

    2 votes
  7. Comment on How Chinese Sci-Fi Conquered America: the translator Ken Liu has done more than anyone to bridge the gap between Chinese science fiction and American readers in ~books

    mundane_and_naive
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    It's interesting how an otherwise relatively straightforward and mundane job like translating foreign fictions can cause troubles for the translator who lives miles away in safety, and dangers for...

    In an odd inversion, some of the stories he has translated into English have not been officially published in China, at times because of their politically sensitive nature. “It’s a very tricky dance of trying to get the message that they’re trying to convey out, without painting the writers as dissidents,” Liu told me over coffee one day, as we sat in the kitchen of his home in Massachusetts. “A lot of Chinese writers are very skilled at writing something ambiguously, such that there are multiple meanings in the text. I have to ask them, how explicit do you want me to be in terms of making a certain point here, because in the original it’s very constrained, so how much do you want me to tease out the implications you’re making? And sometimes we have a discussion about exactly what that means and how they want it to be done.”

    ...“In reality, much of the most interesting science fiction is much more subversive,” he continued. “It is a kind of wry commentary on what is happening in society. And because so many things are changing in China so rapidly, science fiction feels like oftentimes the most realistic way to describe what’s happening.”

    ...“As a translator, it’s very easy to slip into the role where you feel like you’re explaining, or are in a superior position to the author to say what you think they meant to say, or to say what you think ought to be said. I think it’s very dangerous. When you’re translating somebody from a different culture, who is subject to a different political system and who is writing for a different audience than you are, you have to be very careful about not substituting your voice for the author’s voice and not taking away the author’s prerogative to tell the story she wants to tell.”

    It's interesting how an otherwise relatively straightforward and mundane job like translating foreign fictions can cause troubles for the translator who lives miles away in safety, and dangers for the author who probably would have been fine if not due to someone else's translation. Together with all the recent news about US corporations self-censoring themselves in order to please China, I feel this is going to be a common theme for many things in the near future.

    ...dystopian novella by Baoshu, titled, “What Has Passed Shall in Kinder Light Appear.” In the narrative, history runs backward, and China devolves from a superpower into an impoverished, unstable country, as the protagonist grows older and lives through pivotal events in reverse chronological order, witnessing the 2008 Beijing Olympics, then the Tiananmen protests, the Cultural Revolution, the years of famine and the Japanese occupation. The story’s narrator, “a rising star of science fiction,” at one point makes a metafictional observation about the risk he’s taking by writing about politically taboo subjects, noting that some critics claim “that my work was an example of capitalist liberalism and contained metaphors criticizing the Communist Party.”

    Maybe it's because I don't read a lot but this is the first time I hear an idea like this for a story. Should be an interesting read.

    2 votes
  8. Comment on How Scientists Got Climate Change So Wrong in ~enviro

    mundane_and_naive
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    Another user here once mentioned the Privacy Badger extension for getting pass paywall. It still works for me.

    Another user here once mentioned the Privacy Badger extension for getting pass paywall. It still works for me.

    3 votes
  9. Comment on Does Transparency in Moderation Really Matter?: User Behavior After Content Removal Explanations on Reddit in ~science

    mundane_and_naive
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    Why should they take into consideration the reasons for moderators not providing removal reasons? As per their abstract: So it doesn't matter why moderators choose to or not to provide a reason,...

    Why should they take into consideration the reasons for moderators not providing removal reasons? As per their abstract:

    Most importantly, we show that offering explanations for content moderation reduces the odds of future post removals.

    So it doesn't matter why moderators choose to or not to provide a reason, the end result is that if they do, they don't have to remove posts as much in the future.

    Perhaps what you suggest here is that there might have been a systematic bias in this study, where moderators of more toxic subreddits are more likely to choose to not provide reasons, and toxic subreddits are more likely to have posts that require removal. But that would suggests an increase in the number of posts that mods need to remove in the group of mods that choose not to provide reasons, which is already lower than in the group of mods that do provide reasons, according to their findings. If anything, this makes the conclusion that paper reached even stronger, which is that providing reasons for removal reduces the likelihood that moderators need to remove posts again in the future.

    As far as practical application is concerned, if what you're worrying about is the well-being of moderators:

    [...] explanations provided by human moderators did not have a significant advantage
    over explanations provided by bots for reducing future post removals.

    Seems like we can just let automoderators handle the removal, no human have to deal with the backlash.

    1 vote
  10. Comment on Why a social credit system is so scary. in ~news

    mundane_and_naive
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    Hm, in that case, would it be apt to say money itself is already a type of social credit? Like, when we trade on the stock markets, we make decisions based on our expectation of the company's...

    Hm, in that case, would it be apt to say money itself is already a type of social credit? Like, when we trade on the stock markets, we make decisions based on our expectation of the company's growth, which is in turn based on the company's credibility. And when we purchase an item from a store, we trust the words of the shop owners for how much value the item has, with money and its numerical value being the middleman.

    5 votes
  11. Comment on Bojack Horseman - Season 6A - Discussion Thread in ~tv

    mundane_and_naive
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    Speculation My guess is that what went on in rehab will somewhat be foreshadowing of what's to come: people's lives spiraled out of control due to his mistakes, he tried everything he could to fix...
    Speculation

    My guess is that what went on in rehab will somewhat be foreshadowing of what's to come: people's lives spiraled out of control due to his mistakes, he tried everything he could to fix the situation but it's fucked either way. In the end, no one forgave him, and he all he could do is to walk away, sober.

    4 votes
  12. Comment on OpenAI Plays Hide and Seek…and Breaks The Game! in ~comp

    mundane_and_naive
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    There's a thing in game theory where they proved that in any mixed-strategy zero-sum non-cooperative games, which is like most competitive games that we normally play, there exists an optimal...

    There's a thing in game theory where they proved that in any mixed-strategy zero-sum non-cooperative games, which is like most competitive games that we normally play, there exists an optimal strategy where as long as you don't deviate from it, in the long run, you won't loose. I suspect that if we allow AI that are strong enough, eventually they will all gravitate toward this optimal strategy. At that point all matches would look the same (from the meta view) and the deciding factors basically come down to luck, whereas human players who don't (or can't) learn this strategy are just doomed to failed.

    1 vote
  13. Comment on Nearly two-thirds of Uber customers don’t tip their drivers in ~tech

    mundane_and_naive
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    You misunderstood their point. Your earlier comment seems to suggest that since there's no organized movement to abandon tipping, the majority won't do it, so there'd be no change. Their point is...

    You misunderstood their point. Your earlier comment seems to suggest that since there's no organized movement to abandon tipping, the majority won't do it, so there'd be no change. Their point is that there's already a majority who have done it (abandoning tipping) despite there being no organized movement.

    It's no longer a question of whether you should or should not tip. According to the article, majority of people are already not doing it. The question now should be what can the drivers do about it. Are you going to demand your employers to pay you more? Or are you going to shame the customers into paying you more?

    2 votes
  14. Comment on Fortnite's new season has brought the game back to its roots in ~games

    mundane_and_naive
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    As someone who never played Fortnite I'm surprised there are 'seasons' involved. Is that just a gimmicky name for updates or is there an actual ongoing story, and how does that work with the...

    As someone who never played Fortnite I'm surprised there are 'seasons' involved. Is that just a gimmicky name for updates or is there an actual ongoing story, and how does that work with the one-off battle gameplay?

    1 vote
  15. Comment on Do Nazis deserve electricity? in ~talk

    mundane_and_naive
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    Why is it better to preemptively ban them instead of banning them once they display their homophobic behaviors? Tildes philosophy is to "trust the users, but punish abuser". To reject the...

    Why is it better to preemptively ban them instead of banning them once they display their homophobic behaviors? Tildes philosophy is to "trust the users, but punish abuser". To reject the possibility that an individual can change at all, instead of having faith that a community as a whole can handle a small amount of annoyance at first, seem to go against that philosophy.

    I believe a small amount of toxicity, as long as it's kept under control, can actually be beneficial for the community, as that is an opportunity for us casual users to learn how to recognize bullshit and handle them effectively, instead of being completely oblivious and vulnerable. Like vaccines for our informational immune system, so to speak.

    11 votes
  16. Comment on TikTok is the latest window into China’s police state in ~tech

    mundane_and_naive
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    The article isn't about how China censors TikTok. It's about how despite censorship, videos of reality in Xinjiang can still slip through, and how people from outside circumvent censorship to...

    The article isn't about how China censors TikTok. It's about how despite censorship, videos of reality in Xinjiang can still slip through, and how people from outside circumvent censorship to extract those videos.

    2 votes