mundane_and_naive's recent activity

  1. Comment on China concealed extent of virus outbreak, U.S. Intelligence says in ~health.coronavirus

    mundane_and_naive
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    The Chinese number did grow slower than other countries with serious outbreak, but they were also the one with the strictest quarantine measure. So unless someone from the inside come out with...

    The Chinese number did grow slower than other countries with serious outbreak, but they were also the one with the strictest quarantine measure. So unless someone from the inside come out with evidence of deliberate falsification, there's no way to tell after the fact whether the slow growth rate were due to that or just plain effective national response.

    6 votes
  2. Comment on Megathread: April Fools' Day 2020 on the internet in ~misc

    mundane_and_naive
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    Usually the fun is seeing factions form and wage war with each other, not much of that is happening this year it seems.

    Usually the fun is seeing factions form and wage war with each other, not much of that is happening this year it seems.

    3 votes
  3. Comment on 'Herd immunity': Why Britain is actually letting the coronavirus spread in ~health.coronavirus

    mundane_and_naive
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    Then we do it again, only next time, the situation would not be as severe since the majority of initial infected cases are already taken cared of, immunity already built, border control is already...

    Then what?

    Then we do it again, only next time, the situation would not be as severe since the majority of initial infected cases are already taken cared of, immunity already built, border control is already in place, the population are already used to the new pace of life, and the vaccine is one step closer to being realized before the entire population is exposed.

    I find this question particularly disingenuous because it frames controlling the spread as if a pointless exercises, that it's only delaying the inevitable (notice how in their red-green-blue illustration, the blue resurgence is drawn as big as the green, which we have no way of knowing for now. Part of the benefit of immediate restriction is also that the resurgence wouldn't have been as bad as it could have been had we not done so, i.e. the green line).

    Well it's not. Slowing down the spread means reducing the chance that the virus can jump to a new host. Any reduction in hospitalization and/or loss of life is a good thing. Preventing the virus from jumping to a new host too quickly also mean allowing the current host enough time to build up immunity and kill off the virus before it could spread, i.e. the "herd immunity" thing that they're banking their whole strategy on, which by the way, is a natural phenomenon and is always a thing whether the government implement quarantine or not. It's the bare minimum as to what could be counted on. Saying there's no need to worry about infection because herd immunity will protect you is like saying there's no need to worry about the lion attacking your village because once it's full it will go away. This is just using a scientific term to confuse the public.

    Officially, the government won't say that herd immunity is official strategy: "Herd immunity is not our goal or policy. It is a scientific concept," Health Secretary Matt Hancock said on Sunday.

    Because they know they're full of shit.

    Edit: I know it's not your opinion that the decision is right, hope you wouldn't take it personally, just want to take the opportunity to voice my frustration.

    18 votes
  4. Comment on First Hidden Skyscraper Sudoku in ~games

    mundane_and_naive
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    Has to be one of the most interesting sudoku variant I've ever seen. Often times solving sudoku can be quite formulaic, yet with this one additional rule, everything you thought you knew about how...

    Has to be one of the most interesting sudoku variant I've ever seen. Often times solving sudoku can be quite formulaic, yet with this one additional rule, everything you thought you knew about how to solve one is completely turned on its head. Half the fun is in understanding the new rule and its implications, in addition to solving the puzzle itself. Not everyday that sudoku can get you to think outside the box, feels like a good Jonathan Blow puzzle.

    2 votes
  5. Comment on Brands can now purchase an ad in the #2 slot of Reddit's "Trending" sections in the Popular page and Search dropdown in ~tech

    mundane_and_naive
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    Another point to add is that the Patreon model encourages high quality content, something that at least a portion of viewers are compelled enough to donate, rather than something that appeal to...

    Another point to add is that the Patreon model encourages high quality content, something that at least a portion of viewers are compelled enough to donate, rather than something that appeal to the majority that only feel lukewarm about it.

    6 votes
  6. Comment on Twitter starts testing its own version of Stories, called "Fleets," which disappear after 24 hours and can't receive likes, retweets, or replies in ~tech

    mundane_and_naive
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    Feels like over time every social media is becoming every other social media. Not sure if that's good or bad.

    Feels like over time every social media is becoming every other social media. Not sure if that's good or bad.

    7 votes
  7. Comment on I don’t want to be the strong female lead in ~movies

    mundane_and_naive
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    The author brought up an interesting point. Historically, even when we tried to move away from weak female characters, our attempts at strong female characters basically amounted to just strong...

    The author brought up an interesting point. Historically, even when we tried to move away from weak female characters, our attempts at strong female characters basically amounted to just strong masculine characters in female bodies. There's a lack of representation of femininity itself as strength. I recommend this video series analyzing Mad Max: Fury Road and showing how this film accomplished just that.

    Anybody knows any more books or films that also explore this theme?

    5 votes
  8. Comment on The Good Place - S04E13-14 "Whenever You're Ready" FINAL in ~tv

    mundane_and_naive
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    I also think their idea for the afterlife is the most merciful there is, so I suppose the only problem left is the execution. As it stands, whether the system works or not relies heavily on the...

    I also think their idea for the afterlife is the most merciful there is, so I suppose the only problem left is the execution.

    As it stands, whether the system works or not relies heavily on the design of the final test. If in the old system, it's so hard to be a good person that most people got negative points, what's to say in this new system, it wouldn't also be the case that most people fail and never be able to pass no matter how many times they're reborn?

    Their answer is a hint system that manifests as little voices in their heads. However, if being good is just too hard, it could so happen that most people would get reborn so many times that they got hints for practically every decisions in their lives, effectively removing their agency. This could theoretically happen, as the show establishes earlier that life becomes more and more complicated over time, which lead to making good decisions also becoming harder over time.

    So eventually, the Good Place would face a dilemma. Either accepting the reality that every human would require nothing short of a complete cheat sheet to pass, or lowering the benchmark for entering the Good Place. Both seem like steps downward for the moral quality in the afterlife.

    3 votes
  9. Comment on Bojack Horseman - Season 6B - Discussion Thread in ~tv

    mundane_and_naive
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    It's funny that the two shows' endings happened back to back as I think they work pretty well as companion pieces. Then Good Place finale used the afterlife to show us what it's like if you get to...

    It's funny that the two shows' endings happened back to back as I think they work pretty well as companion pieces. Then Good Place finale used the afterlife to show us what it's like if you get to live your lives to the fullest and then be able to die on your own terms. Bojack also got to go to a metaphorical afterlife of sort, but here everyone were overwhelmed with sorrows and regrets, and their final moments weren't at all peaceful but extremely horrifying. But instead of stopping right there, Bojack didn't die and instead the show ends with him kept on living.

    But while the two endings approached deaths from opposite angles, they both advocated for the same lesson, that if you've been a bad person, you have to do it again, only try to be better next time. Bojack Horseman is what The Good Place would have been like if done from Brent's perspective.

    Also mildly interesting that the imagery for death that The Good Place chose was a wave returning to the sea and in Bojack Horseman, death is represented as swarming black tar, i.e. "evil waves", so to speak.

    Both shows explored complex moral dilemmas under the guise of silly humor and both reached pretty much the same conclusion. I swear, these writers could become best friends if they aren't already.

    4 votes
  10. Comment on I propose a new group--Occult in ~tildes

    mundane_and_naive
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    Seems neat, maybe you can have a post or two in ~misc. If it catches on you can then make a case for a group.

    Seems neat, maybe you can have a post or two in ~misc. If it catches on you can then make a case for a group.

    8 votes
  11. Comment on Nine sci-fi subgenres to help you understand the future in ~books

    mundane_and_naive
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    Yep :) I checked if there's any new sci-fi lately after reading that and found this. Been looking for new stuff to read too so this one came in handy. Overall the list seems diverse and topical...

    Yep :) I checked if there's any new sci-fi lately after reading that and found this. Been looking for new stuff to read too so this one came in handy.

    Overall the list seems diverse and topical enough, though I don't read a lot so I'm not sure how comprehensive or representative it really is.

    1 vote
  12. Comment on Scroll: a subscription service partnered with major websites that removes ads and many trackers, and pays sites based on your usage in ~tech

    mundane_and_naive
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    Sites that participate in this model don't have to rely solely on ads anymore, so they may have an incentive to build a more substantially different content catalog for those subscribe to Scroll,...

    Sites that participate in this model don't have to rely solely on ads anymore, so they may have an incentive to build a more substantially different content catalog for those subscribe to Scroll, not just a mere paywall. Viewing full contents may no longer be as simple as installing a blocker in that case. If enough sites do this, pirating content may become troublesome enough that people would then prefer to pay.

    What I'm curious now is if this got big, how would it affect targeted ads services like those offered by Google or many social media. It's no secret that most people read headlines and discussions instead of the actual articles. Sites like Reddit may have incentive to join this model if ads revenue went down, but original content sites may oppose this move as link aggregators syphons views. How would services like Scroll resolve this? Meanwhile, Google would also have a catch 22 with adblockers. On one hand, advertisers may be unhappy that their ads are not being shown to enough people, even more so now. On the other hand, banning adblockers may push even more people to join these subscription services, also making advertisers unhappy.

    3 votes
  13. Comment on A watershed moment for protein structure prediction in ~science

    mundane_and_naive
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    What are some promising applications of protein folding prediction? I guess since I don't know anything about the field, I want to feel "hyped" for a bit. Like, if we "solve" protein folding, can...

    What are some promising applications of protein folding prediction? I guess since I don't know anything about the field, I want to feel "hyped" for a bit. Like, if we "solve" protein folding, can we expect customized cancer treatments on-demand or tackling a few unsolved problems in biology or something.

  14. Comment on What are your unpopular movie opinions? in ~movies

    mundane_and_naive
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    Reminds me of the hate against CG in anime, that it's cheap, lazy, and ugly. For the most part of the medium's history that seems true. Until recently there's this one anime (Land of the...

    Reminds me of the hate against CG in anime, that it's cheap, lazy, and ugly. For the most part of the medium's history that seems true. Until recently there's this one anime (Land of the Lustruous) that not only use CG exclusively but to great stylistic effect. Now people are warming up to the idea.

    Maybe what we need is one good film with excellent use of HFR and people would be fine with it over time.

    3 votes
  15. Comment on Vektroid - Yr Heart in ~music

    mundane_and_naive
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    I think this youtube comment best describes the song, "like falling in love and flying on a rocket ship at the same time". If anyone got any more of those techno-romantic type music, please let me...

    I think this youtube comment best describes the song, "like falling in love and flying on a rocket ship at the same time".

    If anyone got any more of those techno-romantic type music, please let me know!

    1 vote
  16. Comment on Not every movie must be a melodrama in ~movies

    mundane_and_naive
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    In general, I would agree with you that melodrama is not necessary in sci-fi, or movies in general. However, I have to disagree with your choice of examples here. In Arrival, her marriage with the...

    In general, I would agree with you that melodrama is not necessary in sci-fi, or movies in general. However, I have to disagree with your choice of examples here.

    In Arrival, her marriage with the physicist and the subsequent relationship between her and her daughter is the point. The sci-fi plot introduces us to the concept of non-linear time perception and the family drama is it being applied in a familiar human scenario, putting the theory to the test so to speak. If you can see the future and know what tragedy is waiting ahead, would you still make the decisions that will inevitably lead to said future? The movie argues that you still would. The family drama is necessary to illustrate the serious implication of an otherwise dry and arbitrary concept.

    As for Interstellar, its message is that love transcend space and time. So to illustrate this idea, the movie put the main character in situations where he continuously get separated from humanity and any people he knows, both across vast distance and astronomical stretch of time. Yet in the end, he chooses to make a decision based on the love for his daughter, not knowing if it will amount to anything; and his daughter chooses to follow her hunch that her father communicates with her, despite all logic. You may disagree with the message that the film tries to say, but as far as the message is concerned, the family relationship is what drives the point home and so very much necessary.

    Personally, I'm fine with human dramas in my sci-fi, as long as they're in service of the sci-fi concepts being explored.

    6 votes