mundane_and_naive's recent activity

  1. Comment on alyaza is unbanned in ~tildes.official

    mundane_and_naive Link Parent
    To quote Frank Herbert:

    This is a problem with so many moderation decisions. Almost all of it displays some level of subjectivity.

    To quote Frank Herbert:

    Good government never depends upon laws, but upon the personal qualities of those who govern. The machinery of government is always subordinate to the will of those who administer that machinery. The most important element of government, therefore, is the method of choosing leaders. - Law and Governance, The Spacing Guild Manual - Children of Dune

    11 votes
  2. Comment on TV Tuesdays Free Talk in ~tv

    mundane_and_naive Link Parent
    That's fair. The Leftovers feels a lot like a play, where characters' conflicts and inner struggles are expressed through eloquent dialogues, with bombastic events happening around only as...

    That's fair. The Leftovers feels a lot like a play, where characters' conflicts and inner struggles are expressed through eloquent dialogues, with bombastic events happening around only as backdrop. That is the opposite of what we normally think of as good storytelling in films or TV shows, which is all about 'show don't tell' and letting us witness the struggle that the characters go through while they're doing so, not just hearing about it. I can understand how that can be boring.

    ... the very, very first minute of the first episode [of Season 2], which has you back in prehistoric time and tries to make some abstract point about a mother, her baby, life and death and what not and seriously, that set the tone for the entire show for me: Something that's far too proud to be itself and thinks itself better than its viewers.

    When I first saw that scene, my thought was "Interesting, that's a very clever analogy for the Departure". That scene is the show's answer to its central mystery of what causes the Departure, which is supposed to be unanswerable, by effectively showing us how unanswerable that is via an analogy (the Departure is as inexplicable to us as an earthquake is to a caveman). I like the show for putting in the effort to sell its setting as believable to viewers and at no point did I feel like being looked down on. So I think we both picked up on what the show was trying to do, we just reacted differently.

    3 votes
  3. Comment on TV Tuesdays Free Talk in ~tv

    mundane_and_naive Link Parent
    Interesting. How do you find The Walking Dead exploring the human aspect better than The Leftovers?

    Interesting. How do you find The Walking Dead exploring the human aspect better than The Leftovers?

    2 votes
  4. Comment on TV Tuesdays Free Talk in ~tv

    mundane_and_naive Link Parent
    It runs like a proper drama, creative liberties were taken here and there for dramatization but kept to a minimal, like how Narcos does it but with no narration.

    It runs like a proper drama, creative liberties were taken here and there for dramatization but kept to a minimal, like how Narcos does it but with no narration.

    1 vote
  5. Comment on Game of Thrones Season 8 Episode 5 Discussion in ~tv

    mundane_and_naive Link Parent
    This makes me curious. Has there been any other case of a show failing not because of network meddling with creators' vision but the other way around?

    This makes me curious. Has there been any other case of a show failing not because of network meddling with creators' vision but the other way around?

    3 votes
  6. Comment on Movie Monday Free Talk in ~movies

    mundane_and_naive Link
    Watched Eighth Grade, it's essentially a coming-of-age story set in the current age of social media culture. It's a very heartwarming story that I believe anyone with social anxiety can definitely...

    Watched Eighth Grade, it's essentially a coming-of-age story set in the current age of social media culture. It's a very heartwarming story that I believe anyone with social anxiety can definitely relate to. What I especially like about the film though is how subdued yet emotionally intense the conflicts are. There are no big fights, no massive arguments with continuous back-and-forth, just a lot of pent-up frustration between parties. It's like a pressure cooker that gradually builds up tension until it finally exceed its limit but instead of exploding, the boiling water just bursts out and spills all over the place.

    4 votes
  7. Comment on Why Tildes is the only place I can actually enjoy discussing politics and other controversial topics now in ~tildes

    mundane_and_naive (edited ) Link Parent
    I like the idea of placebo label. Of course people will realize what's up after some time, it will still be able to weed out the dispassionate majority of trolls who don't put much thought into...

    I like the idea of placebo label. Of course people will realize what's up after some time, it will still be able to weed out the dispassionate majority of trolls who don't put much thought into their actions. At least it's something worth experimenting with. Best case scenario, great quality of life improvement with little cost. Worst case scenario, nothing changes and removing the feature is just as effortless as adding it in the first place.

    1 vote
  8. Comment on In contrast to Facebook, Google seems to be leaning into the message that they have all your data, and emphasizing how that allows them to make your life easier in ~tech

    mundane_and_naive Link Parent
    This guy goes into the topic of breaking up tech corporation in quite details. The bottom line is: it's complicated.

    This guy goes into the topic of breaking up tech corporation in quite details. The bottom line is: it's complicated.

    4 votes
  9. Comment on What have you been watching/reading this week? (Anime/Manga) in ~anime

    mundane_and_naive Link
    Carole and Tuesday - So far the story is wholesome and the songs are lovely. What I'm most curious about is how the setting is going to be explored, if at all (the fact that it's set on Mars and...

    Carole and Tuesday - So far the story is wholesome and the songs are lovely. What I'm most curious about is how the setting is going to be explored, if at all (the fact that it's set on Mars and not Earth, and the idea that AI can generate better music than human). Hopefully it won't just be there as window-dressing for what's on the surface quite a standard story about chasing your dream as a musician. If not though, it's still quite a relaxing slice of life story, so far.

    1 vote
  10. Comment on A personal story about fake news in ~talk

    mundane_and_naive Link
    To combat fake news, do you think people should learn to always check the news sources, or there being means to make spotting fake news more convenient, or government cracking down on fake news...

    To combat fake news, do you think people should learn to always check the news sources, or there being means to make spotting fake news more convenient, or government cracking down on fake news outlets, or something else? I know the obvious answer is "all of the above" but in terms of priority, is there any one way that is more effective or practical than others?

    5 votes
  11. Comment on Recommend me a book that _________. in ~books

    mundane_and_naive Link
    Recommend me a sci-fi story that's not about space expansion and military technology.

    Recommend me a sci-fi story that's not about space expansion and military technology.

    4 votes
  12. Comment on A common misconception is that the risk of overfitting increases with the number of parameters in the model. In reality, a single parameter suffices to fit most datasets in ~science

    mundane_and_naive Link
    Layman here. If not the number of parameters, what are other ways to judge how prone to overfitting a function is, beside just testing it out on a new data set?

    Layman here. If not the number of parameters, what are other ways to judge how prone to overfitting a function is, beside just testing it out on a new data set?

  13. Comment on What are you reading these days? #18 in ~books

    mundane_and_naive (edited ) Link Parent
    About how it felt sketched out, I agree. It kind of gives you a bird-eye view of the events only and doesn't let you fully immerse in the plot. There's probably some significance behind the style...

    About how it felt sketched out, I agree. It kind of gives you a bird-eye view of the events only and doesn't let you fully immerse in the plot. There's probably some significance behind the style that I haven't picked up on though. The author used to be an engineer as well so that probably influences the way he writes somewhat.

    Someone commented on Reddit about how the books' theme being actually about surveillance, which I find quite interesting and that help me appreciate a lot of the details in retrospect. That might be part of why it's more popular back in China too since they can probably relate to the story more than us.

    2 votes
  14. Comment on Experimenting with a way of avoiding deeply nested comment threads in ~tildes.official

    mundane_and_naive (edited ) Link Parent
    Oh, then it probably was something that's always there but I only noticed just now. I was referring to the way the line runs continuously across multiple headers for the flattened comment chain,...

    Oh, then it probably was something that's always there but I only noticed just now. I was referring to the way the line runs continuously across multiple headers for the flattened comment chain, but leaves a small gap when a separate sibling comment appears. This could still work as a way to avoid confusion, if only it would be more obvious so that it's easier to notice when skimming comment chains.

    2 votes
  15. Comment on Experimenting with a way of avoiding deeply nested comment threads in ~tildes.official

    mundane_and_naive Link
    I notice the little change in visual indicator and propose this slight modification to make the distinction a bit more noticeable. Does it work?

    I notice the little change in visual indicator and propose this slight modification to make the distinction a bit more noticeable. Does it work?

    2 votes
  16. Comment on What are you reading these days? #18 in ~books

    mundane_and_naive (edited ) Link Parent
    Interesting, I find the second book to be the best one all thanks to the dark forest theory. The others are good too, somehow the author managed to throw in one insane idea after another and it...

    Interesting, I find the second book to be the best one all thanks to the dark forest theory. The others are good too, somehow the author managed to throw in one insane idea after another and it keep me hooked throughout. The dark forest theory, however, isn't just scientific mumbo-jumbo but also has solid logical foundation and I like that a lot. May I ask what do you like and dislike between the books?

    Also side note, I see people typically criticize the books for lack of strong characters and that they mostly just serve as talking-head which I also... mostly agree with. That said though, the books somehow always manage to end on a very poignant note that got me to actually feel for the characters (and humanity as a whole too, given its theme). So this sci-fi story isn't just science talk and there are some real emotions underneath.

    2 votes
  17. Comment on AIs should have the same ethical protections as animals in ~tech

    mundane_and_naive (edited ) Link Parent
    The difference between a human and a machine in your hypothetical scenario, to me, is a difference between a top-down and a bottom-up approach, and that would imply different courses of action...

    The difference between a human and a machine in your hypothetical scenario, to me, is a difference between a top-down and a bottom-up approach, and that would imply different courses of action toward the same ethical concern.

    On one hand, we have a human, with all its human needs and wants, from basic survival and preservation of bodily functions to pursuing happiness and self-actualization. To achieve full economical efficiency, you opt to strip this human off the majority of its pre-existing human functions, bar only those relevant to the tasks we require it to perform.

    On the other hand, we have a machine, or rather the idea for a machine since it hasn't been built yet. We need it to perform a certain task, so we design then build it to have functions that are relevant to performing that task. To make this more interesting, this machine could look as if it were a scarily good replication of the human architecture too. In actuality though, it would not, need not and should not be, since we're being economical and adding a bunch of human-like features without benefit to its performance wouldn't be economical.

    Now people raise ethical concern that no functional agents should suffer. How do we apply that to the human? Just don't strip them of their pre-existing human capacity. How do we apply that to the machine? Just don't build them with the capacity to suffer. Being able to feel suffering seems to go against productivity anyway, so this wouldn't be an issue from the start.

    Edit: Side note, even though we human have ethical concerns about animal suffering, we don't apply those to plants or inanimate objects. So there's precedence for the idea that if an entity doesn't have the capacity to suffer, there's no ethical concern for its suffering.

    1 vote
  18. Comment on Virus | Trailer in ~movies

    mundane_and_naive Link
    This looks decent and not at all like my impression of what a stereotypical Bollywood movie would look like. May I ask what's the general quality of thrillers produced in India and how this one...

    This looks decent and not at all like my impression of what a stereotypical Bollywood movie would look like. May I ask what's the general quality of thrillers produced in India and how this one might compare?

    1 vote
  19. Comment on Comcast is in talks to sell its 30% stake in Hulu to Disney in ~tv

    mundane_and_naive Link Parent
    It's an interesting dilemma. We want everything consolidated in one place, but we also don't want whoever in control of that place to screw over us consumers either. Should we choose convenience...

    It's an interesting dilemma. We want everything consolidated in one place, but we also don't want whoever in control of that place to screw over us consumers either. Should we choose convenience over leverage?

    6 votes
  20. Comment on The hyperbolic "battle" between Steven Spielberg and Netflix fizzles out, as the Academy announces no change to Oscars eligibility rules in ~movies

    mundane_and_naive Link Parent
    Maybe all the streaming services should just make their own award shows and let the public decide which award shows are more valuable.

    Maybe all the streaming services should just make their own award shows and let the public decide which award shows are more valuable.

    1 vote