mundane_and_naive's recent activity

  1. Comment on De-escalating social media conflict: admitting mistakes in ~tech

    mundane_and_naive
    Link Parent
    The effect may be different. Clicking a "I made a mistake" button and having a site-wide label shown feels more like an official declaration, possibly borderlining virtue signalling depending on...

    The effect may be different. Clicking a "I made a mistake" button and having a site-wide label shown feels more like an official declaration, possibly borderlining virtue signalling depending on how eye catching the label is, but mostly useful as way to tell people not to bother wasting time reading. Normal edits is more muted and hidden, suitable for minor corrections that doesn't significantly change the meaning of the content. But for major changes, an add-on edit at the end can take readers out of the flow after having being so invested only to realize at the end that most of it was pointless, either that or a jumbled mess or strikethough everywhere.

    The example in the article showed that in addition to a warning label, it also disable replies and I think this is key as it provides clear functionality. It's not just a way to signal to others a message, you click it if you want to stop receiving replies that you already know would be mostly pointless corrections. A while ago, there was also a Tildes thread discussing ways to de-escalate in discussions. One of the idea was to give people the ability to stop others from replying to their comments and the problem that was pointed out was that people would just use it to end an argument with them having the last words. Well with Twitter's arrangement, you don't exactly win an argument by attaching to yourself a label that basically means "I admit defeat" now do you, it's quite elegant.

    I believe Tildes can benefits from some variations of this and there's also a general approach here that we could explore about how to prevent trolls from abusing a functionality by attaching self-defeating connotations toward using it.

    3 votes
  2. Comment on What's wrong with WhatsApp? As social media has become more inhospitable, the appeal of private online groups has grown. But they hold their own dangers – to those both inside and out in ~tech

    mundane_and_naive
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    This article argues against blaming Whatsapp. Two points that I found notable: Violent incidents was just as high in India before Whatsapp was ever a factor. Back in 2007 in Kenya, there was...

    This article argues against blaming Whatsapp. Two points that I found notable:

    • Violent incidents was just as high in India before Whatsapp was ever a factor.

    • Back in 2007 in Kenya, there was phenomenon called "Black Propaganda SMS" where false rumors and violence were spread through uses of SMS.

    Seems to me this is not a new tech problem. If there exists a solution, it would have to be more foundational than curbing technology.

    3 votes
  3. Comment on Tenet - New trailer for the Christopher Nolan movie in ~movies

    mundane_and_naive
    Link Parent
    How do you feel about Dunkirk? That was one of his more grounded project.

    How do you feel about Dunkirk? That was one of his more grounded project.

    2 votes
  4. Comment on Never Trumpers' strange relationship with the Democratic Party in ~misc

    mundane_and_naive
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    which makes me wonder how did other countries move past the first-past-the-post system, or did they just never have it from the start?

    which makes me wonder how did other countries move past the first-past-the-post system, or did they just never have it from the start?

    2 votes
  5. Comment on Department of Homeland Security report: China hid virus’ severity to hoard supplies in ~health.coronavirus

    mundane_and_naive
    Link Parent
    Off topic: have we had any concrete explanation for this since, given that the official reason of an imminent attack was proven false and assuming that this was not a unilateral decision by Trump?

    Iran leader assasinations

    Off topic: have we had any concrete explanation for this since, given that the official reason of an imminent attack was proven false and assuming that this was not a unilateral decision by Trump?

    1 vote
  6. Comment on Science-fiction visionary Kim Stanley Robinson makes the case for quantitative easing our way out of planetary doom in ~enviro

    mundane_and_naive
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    Interesting, maybe this carbon coin could work in tandem with carbon tax like some kind of carrot and stick for the economy.

    Interesting, maybe this carbon coin could work in tandem with carbon tax like some kind of carrot and stick for the economy.

    2 votes
  7. Comment on How China sees the world - And how the world should see China in ~misc

    mundane_and_naive
    Link Parent
    Seems like aging population is an especially big concern for China. Sure I guess an authoritative government could maintain its control just fine if the country were to become poor again, but they...

    Seems like aging population is an especially big concern for China. Sure I guess an authoritative government could maintain its control just fine if the country were to become poor again, but they probably don't want to settle for such an outcome.

    4 votes
  8. Comment on The pandemic is giving people vivid, unusual dreams. Here’s why in ~health

    mundane_and_naive
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    So stress-induced dreams due to all the chaos around the pandemic, not directly caused by the virus itself. Good to know, though I hope this wouldn't grow into something like the Wind Turbine...

    So stress-induced dreams due to all the chaos around the pandemic, not directly caused by the virus itself. Good to know, though I hope this wouldn't grow into something like the Wind Turbine Syndrome.

    5 votes
  9. Comment on China concealed extent of virus outbreak, U.S. Intelligence says in ~health.coronavirus

    mundane_and_naive
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    The Chinese number did grow slower than other countries with serious outbreak, but they were also the one with the strictest quarantine measure. So unless someone from the inside come out with...

    The Chinese number did grow slower than other countries with serious outbreak, but they were also the one with the strictest quarantine measure. So unless someone from the inside come out with evidence of deliberate falsification, there's no way to tell after the fact whether the slow growth rate were due to that or just plain effective national response.

    6 votes
  10. Comment on Megathread: April Fools' Day 2020 on the internet in ~misc

    mundane_and_naive
    Link Parent
    Usually the fun is seeing factions form and wage war with each other, not much of that is happening this year it seems.

    Usually the fun is seeing factions form and wage war with each other, not much of that is happening this year it seems.

    3 votes
  11. Comment on 'Herd immunity': Why Britain is actually letting the coronavirus spread in ~health.coronavirus

    mundane_and_naive
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    Then we do it again, only next time, the situation would not be as severe since the majority of initial infected cases are already taken cared of, immunity already built, border control is already...

    Then what?

    Then we do it again, only next time, the situation would not be as severe since the majority of initial infected cases are already taken cared of, immunity already built, border control is already in place, the population are already used to the new pace of life, and the vaccine is one step closer to being realized before the entire population is exposed.

    I find this question particularly disingenuous because it frames controlling the spread as if a pointless exercises, that it's only delaying the inevitable (notice how in their red-green-blue illustration, the blue resurgence is drawn as big as the green, which we have no way of knowing for now. Part of the benefit of immediate restriction is also that the resurgence wouldn't have been as bad as it could have been had we not done so, i.e. the green line).

    Well it's not. Slowing down the spread means reducing the chance that the virus can jump to a new host. Any reduction in hospitalization and/or loss of life is a good thing. Preventing the virus from jumping to a new host too quickly also mean allowing the current host enough time to build up immunity and kill off the virus before it could spread, i.e. the "herd immunity" thing that they're banking their whole strategy on, which by the way, is a natural phenomenon and is always a thing whether the government implement quarantine or not. It's the bare minimum as to what could be counted on. Saying there's no need to worry about infection because herd immunity will protect you is like saying there's no need to worry about the lion attacking your village because once it's full it will go away. This is just using a scientific term to confuse the public.

    Officially, the government won't say that herd immunity is official strategy: "Herd immunity is not our goal or policy. It is a scientific concept," Health Secretary Matt Hancock said on Sunday.

    Because they know they're full of shit.

    Edit: I know it's not your opinion that the decision is right, hope you wouldn't take it personally, just want to take the opportunity to voice my frustration.

    18 votes
  12. Comment on First Hidden Skyscraper Sudoku in ~games

    mundane_and_naive
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    Has to be one of the most interesting sudoku variant I've ever seen. Often times solving sudoku can be quite formulaic, yet with this one additional rule, everything you thought you knew about how...

    Has to be one of the most interesting sudoku variant I've ever seen. Often times solving sudoku can be quite formulaic, yet with this one additional rule, everything you thought you knew about how to solve one is completely turned on its head. Half the fun is in understanding the new rule and its implications, in addition to solving the puzzle itself. Not everyday that sudoku can get you to think outside the box, feels like a good Jonathan Blow puzzle.

    2 votes
  13. Comment on Brands can now purchase an ad in the #2 slot of Reddit's "Trending" sections in the Popular page and Search dropdown in ~tech

    mundane_and_naive
    Link Parent
    Another point to add is that the Patreon model encourages high quality content, something that at least a portion of viewers are compelled enough to donate, rather than something that appeal to...

    Another point to add is that the Patreon model encourages high quality content, something that at least a portion of viewers are compelled enough to donate, rather than something that appeal to the majority that only feel lukewarm about it.

    6 votes
  14. Comment on Twitter starts testing its own version of Stories, called "Fleets," which disappear after 24 hours and can't receive likes, retweets, or replies in ~tech

    mundane_and_naive
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    Feels like over time every social media is becoming every other social media. Not sure if that's good or bad.

    Feels like over time every social media is becoming every other social media. Not sure if that's good or bad.

    7 votes
  15. Comment on I don’t want to be the strong female lead in ~movies

    mundane_and_naive
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    The author brought up an interesting point. Historically, even when we tried to move away from weak female characters, our attempts at strong female characters basically amounted to just strong...

    The author brought up an interesting point. Historically, even when we tried to move away from weak female characters, our attempts at strong female characters basically amounted to just strong masculine characters in female bodies. There's a lack of representation of femininity itself as strength. I recommend this video series analyzing Mad Max: Fury Road and showing how this film accomplished just that.

    Anybody knows any more books or films that also explore this theme?

    5 votes
  16. Comment on The Good Place - S04E13-14 "Whenever You're Ready" FINAL in ~tv

    mundane_and_naive
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    I also think their idea for the afterlife is the most merciful there is, so I suppose the only problem left is the execution. As it stands, whether the system works or not relies heavily on the...

    I also think their idea for the afterlife is the most merciful there is, so I suppose the only problem left is the execution.

    As it stands, whether the system works or not relies heavily on the design of the final test. If in the old system, it's so hard to be a good person that most people got negative points, what's to say in this new system, it wouldn't also be the case that most people fail and never be able to pass no matter how many times they're reborn?

    Their answer is a hint system that manifests as little voices in their heads. However, if being good is just too hard, it could so happen that most people would get reborn so many times that they got hints for practically every decisions in their lives, effectively removing their agency. This could theoretically happen, as the show establishes earlier that life becomes more and more complicated over time, which lead to making good decisions also becoming harder over time.

    So eventually, the Good Place would face a dilemma. Either accepting the reality that every human would require nothing short of a complete cheat sheet to pass, or lowering the benchmark for entering the Good Place. Both seem like steps downward for the moral quality in the afterlife.

    3 votes
  17. Comment on Bojack Horseman - Season 6B - Discussion Thread in ~tv

    mundane_and_naive
    (edited )
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    It's funny that the two shows' endings happened back to back as I think they work pretty well as companion pieces. Then Good Place finale used the afterlife to show us what it's like if you get to...

    It's funny that the two shows' endings happened back to back as I think they work pretty well as companion pieces. Then Good Place finale used the afterlife to show us what it's like if you get to live your lives to the fullest and then be able to die on your own terms. Bojack also got to go to a metaphorical afterlife of sort, but here everyone were overwhelmed with sorrows and regrets, and their final moments weren't at all peaceful but extremely horrifying. But instead of stopping right there, Bojack didn't die and instead the show ends with him kept on living.

    But while the two endings approached deaths from opposite angles, they both advocated for the same lesson, that if you've been a bad person, you have to do it again, only try to be better next time. Bojack Horseman is what The Good Place would have been like if done from Brent's perspective.

    Also mildly interesting that the imagery for death that The Good Place chose was a wave returning to the sea and in Bojack Horseman, death is represented as swarming black tar, i.e. "evil waves", so to speak.

    Both shows explored complex moral dilemmas under the guise of silly humor and both reached pretty much the same conclusion. I swear, these writers could become best friends if they aren't already.

    4 votes
  18. Comment on I propose a new group--Occult in ~tildes

    mundane_and_naive
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    Seems neat, maybe you can have a post or two in ~misc. If it catches on you can then make a case for a group.

    Seems neat, maybe you can have a post or two in ~misc. If it catches on you can then make a case for a group.

    8 votes